Is Lindy progressing? Need another set of eyes...

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by SkyeTiger, Feb 8, 2018.

  1. SkyeTiger

    SkyeTiger Senior Member

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    *sorry mods if this is in the wrong place!*

    So Lindy is coming 13 and I started noticing her dropping weight and muscle/top line. :( She has always been a chunky monkey and beef muscle. haha I completely changed what she is getting and I think I’m seeing a difference and was curious if everyone else did? She was on Nutrena Safechoice Original and now is on 3 lbs of Triple Crown Senior, 4 “squirts” of DAC oil, and one scoop of Dac DDA a day.
    This pic is where we started :(

    78479FE2-085C-4C15-A998-A5D171A16872.jpeg

    A week later

    B5C70F3B-2AC9-4F5D-83B8-AA5EFC41F86A.jpeg

    3 weeks later (today)

    06F0FA6D-5BB0-4485-BF9A-3CB04D9A16AC.jpeg

    I feel like her top line, withers, and hips have started to fill in. Her ribs will be last I guess!
     
  2. barrel_racer64

    barrel_racer64 Senior Member

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    Its a little difficult to tell (for me at least) since the pictures are all different angles, but it does look like her withers and hip are at least filling in some.
     
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  3. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Yep, coming right along.
     
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  4. DocsLglyBlonde

    DocsLglyBlonde Senior Member

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    I would up the TCS to the recommended 5lb minimum if she has free choice hay. I don't think there's a need for the other things either then. She definitely looks better though, and I love TCS (Nutrena not so much)!

    I would be a little concerned about ulcers, with the weight loss (was there a good reason for it?), poor topline, and sunken hip (a biggie I've noticed when mine are ulcery). If my memory is right, in the past she's had soundness issues, so if she was on stall rest, NSAIDs, etc ulcers would be a concern for me, especially if she has other symptoms beyond what we can see here.
     
  5. SkyeTiger

    SkyeTiger Senior Member

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    We worried about Ulcers too. She started losing weight like this within 2-3 weeks of me moving her to this barn. :( The Dac DDA helps a lot with ulcers.
     
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  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I don't think she looks significantly better, but I also think no horse can possibly look any better after a week or two or three anyway(unless they were starved before).

    Suggestion. Weigh your horse once a week with a weight tape. Don't try to determine if she's losing weight by looking at her or at photos from time to time. Weigh her once a week. Write it down in a notebook or spread sheet. Sorry, but I just don't think it works at all well to do anything but weigh the horse once a week. Weight tapes aren't perfect to the pound, but they're good enough for determining how much feed the animal should get by body weight, and if you apply the tape the same way each time, you get a very accurate picture of changes in weight.

    Another suggestion - weigh your horse's hay and determine if she's out on grass and for how many hours a day. When you consider her feed, always include any forage (hay, pasture, any grazing, beet pulp, alfalfa cubes or meal, etc), that she gets. Weighing those and calculating how much those contribute to her diet is important.

    Most horses get 90% of their calories from their forage. Say the horse gets 20 lbs of forage. And 3 lbs of Triple Crown senior(1500 cal a pound, 4500 cal for 3 lbs). The forage - let's say a grass type forage, so we can do math with a forage that doesn't even provide a lot of calories per pound, say 800 calories a pound. 20 lbs is 16,000 calories. That means a total of 20,500 calories, and the hay is providing 80% of her calories. Even with a really low calorie forage.

    With a 'decent' quality forage, the horse gets 90% or more of his calories - and nutrition - from forage.

    Most of the time, people over-estimate the number of calories the bagged feed provides, and under-estimate the calories from the forage. This leads to bagged feed sales going up, but it probably doesn't improve our horse's nutrition.

    And I dare say, that when many horses start losing weight, very often it's because of a reduction in the amount of forage they get. When I've boarded, I've found that feed instructions are often forgotten or ignored, and many forage changes occur with changes of staff, shortages or changes to the quality of the forage.

    And when I've been buying my own hay, I find even when it comes from the same farmer and field, every cutting isn't the same. Sometimes I can compensate for forage quality changes from one cutting to the next by adding a little alfalfa forage or beet pulp, but in other cases, I might just buy different hay.

    If the forage quality dropped off, I'd be tempted to supplement it with a forage product, like buying a compressed bale of alfalfa, alfalfa meal or other product, that I fed myself, instead of feeding oil and supplements and changing the bagged feed.

    If you feed less than the minimum recommended amount of a feed, the horse will not get enough vitamins, minerals, protein, calories, etc, especially of feeds that are 'geared' toward being a part of a diet of a specific forage type.

    It's not a good idea to feed less than the minimum of a given feed and then add on supplements to try to compensate. It's just not a good idea. It's so easy to wind up with nutritional 'holes' in the diet.

    Also, just a general elderly and peevish question, why do many people who start these threads so often not mention the hay or pasture the horse is getting? Or the work the horse is getting (or very little detail about the animal's work).
     
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  7. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Looks pretty good, but it's not been "that long". Good luck, pretty lady.
     
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  8. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    Only problem I can see is that DAC Oil has corn in it and I got you to switch because the corn might have possibly caused the weight loss. With corn oil Foxy would get fatty deposits. Equine Omega Complete even gave him a crest on his neck. Otherwise I do see an improvement. Might be better though to take photos of her from the same angle each week. I did that with Foxy once I got him off of corn.
     
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  9. DocsLglyBlonde

    DocsLglyBlonde Senior Member

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    I personally would drop both additives (I don't see a big benefit to either), bump up the TCS (again, assuming she's getting as much forage as she'll eat currently), and treat for ulcers with omeprazole. You can also add in some alfalfa to help buffer excess stomach acid, and you can always add a gastric support supplement after treatment to help prevent future issues. I've been thrilled with Smartpak's Leg Up Stomach pellets as a supporting supplement - they are very reasonably priced and I have notice a big difference with my mare on them. She also had ulcers after foundering (stall rest, NSAIDs, diet change, etc) which went undiagnosed for much longer than they should have, and she is very prone to them now despite doing everything else "right."
     
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  10. SkyeTiger

    SkyeTiger Senior Member

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    How do u know when she has them? What were her symptoms?
     

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