Ideas/ Experiences with Horse bucking at trot.

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by LoveHollywood19, Jun 4, 2018.

  1. LoveHollywood19

    LoveHollywood19 Senior Member

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    Hello,

    I'm working with someone's horse at the moment that has a tendency to 'bunny hop' at the trot and am trying to figure out If it"s behavioral or pain related. The Vet and farrier are involved on a consistent basis and so far have found nothing. The horse also gets chiropractor work done regularly and the saddle has been checked and fitted. He has thrown some rather large bucks with other riders, but it has only been small little bunny hops with me. I've worked with horses that bucked over the years and I prefer to look at all angles before I attempt to ride through them.

    The horse previously was used as a hubby/trail horse and occasionally as stud, then was gelded late. He came with an ill fitting saddle, but that has since been fixed. That was quite a while ago, now. When he first came, he was quite pushy, but after about a year of groundwork he is MUCH better and respectful of everyones personal space. I just started riding him consistently this year and others were riding him on trail rides the year before. He's had a little arena work, but mostly at the walk because he is still very green. Last year, he did buck someone off on a trail ride, but I wasn't there so I'm not sure exactly what happened. I heard they got back on, but I also thought I heard that they didn't get back on immediately and walked him back in the trail to find a spot to get back on. I'm thinking he may have clicked buck=get rider off. He is generally a calm horse, but every so often he does seem to test his rider.

    He is excellent at the walk and just learning how to relax over the back and into the bit, but as soon as you attempt to trot he tries to buck. He spent most of his life inverted like a giraffe and has alot of belly, so for now, my aim is just to get him consistent on the bit at the walk, relaxed over the back, and add a few trot steps in at a time. Sometimes he will pick up the trot himself and he never bucks in that instance. He does however bunny hop when asked to trot. While lunging, he does not buck at the trot, but will at the canter. The owner has said he can get a little rowdy on the lungeline, but he has only ever tried that once with me and now he has been quite good. Currently he is on bute for a week to see if there are any changes. He still bucks at the canter on the lungeline.

    I've been thinking that this may possibly be due to weak stifles since he is out of shape and it could also be a learned behavior. Has anyone had a horse like this and figured out why they were bucking? I just find it strange because he isn't a reactive horse, doesn't seem frustrated, and doesn't seem uncomfortable.
     
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  2. gaitedboomer

    gaitedboomer Senior Member

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    My Arab would lightly buck up, when I tried to get him in a canter, due to an injured vertebra that came with him when I rescued him.

    Try him bareback and see if he still bucks up. If he does, it's either pain (in which case find a better chiropractor) or a learned habit.

    If he does NOT, I don't care how well they say the saddle fits, it doesn't fit. Some horses are like "Rhe Princess and the pea" fairy tale and are very sensitive to saddle fit. Other horses seem to be able to have anything thrown on them and they are fine:)
     
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  3. WesternRider22

    WesternRider22 Full Member

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    When he crow-hops what do you do?

    If you feel your horse even thinking about crow-hopping do a one-rein stop to prevent it. Once you’ve got him stopped, get off and go right to work moving his feet from the ground by lunging at the canter, yielding the hindquarters etc.
    Soon the horse will realize it would have been easier to just trot than have to canter on the lunge line.

    The crow-hopping comes from a lack of respect. Often the culprit is a fat, lazy horse that doesn’t want to go forward. When you ask this horse to trot, and he crow-hops it’s his way of telling you to get lost.
     
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  4. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Post some videos please. We'd need eyes on to give any really accurate info. I'd post walk, trot video leading them away and towards us, then on a lunge line at wtc and then riding to be as accurate as we can.
     
  5. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Not necessarily on it being lack of respect or laziness. It could be many things.
     
  6. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    New behavior for him?
     
  7. MuckMuck

    MuckMuck Senior Member

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    In many cases the problem lies in the balance of the horse between their front and back end.

    The legs get sort of get stuck balancing and carrying the riders load and the horse can not free up.

    In the wild a horse just pops up and "unites" their front and rear as they move and as they gain skill with their load.

    I would not be too quick to condemn the horses hop and would instead look at the overall coordination of the animal first.
     
  8. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    I have to completely disagree with this. All this teaches the horse is if he bucks, you get off. He's not going to make the connection between him bucking and the work because there's too much in between - getting off, setting up to lunge, etc.

    Little crow-hops, I generally just push through. As mucky said, it's often a question of balance.
     
  9. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Post a Video of him doing it, at as close of a distance as possible to you.

    No tellin what is going on without seeing the horse and rider in action.
     
  10. WesternRider22

    WesternRider22 Full Member

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    I guess you are right... But I really like Clinton Andersons method and that is what he says to do.
    I will delete my post. I will not deny I may have been wrong about the whole getting off thing.....
    When My gelding would always buck I usually did not get off but kept him going and sped him up.
     
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