"Husband" Horses

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by JinxedDream, Jul 16, 2017.

  1. JinxedDream

    JinxedDream Senior Member

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    I'm beyond thrilled. My SO just agreed to let me go horse shopping for a second horse... for him. But I am a bit stuck on how to do this. Why? I always buy project horses. Horses with some kind of problem that I am capable of fixing but are otherwise suitable for my own needs. This means usually these are green horses or spoiled bratty horses that have been sitting in someone's back pasture for a few years. Clearly can not do this with my BF. That would be silly and stupid.

    My SO's requirement list:
    - He'd like a paint or something that doesn't look like an "Amish cart horse" - I honestly don't care about the colour, he might but if it came down to price on colour, he'd buy the plain bay.
    - He's 6'2" with a lean body type and long legs, going to need something stockier
    - He wants to work cattle and sheep with said horse - mainly the horse can't have a meltdown when it meets either
    - He hasn't really ridden much because my horse isn't exactly safe

    Whatever we buy, I have to like it too because I'm willing to bet he'll ride maybe once a week on weekends and the rest of the time, its my responsibility. Plus side, my gelding won't be an only horse.

    What should I look for? I'm thinking ex-kids horse, QH gelding, 15hh and 10-12 years old. Before he said he wanted to ride the horse, I was looking at STBs but I don't think that is a good idea if he wants to ride. He can not ride my gelding who is quiet, and good with livestock but he's very athletic and anxious easily and my BF will not have the confidence or muscle memory to ride him.
     
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  2. StarPattern

    StarPattern Senior Member

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    Why couldn't he ride a STB? They make some very stocky Standardbreds and most standies have a great, solid mind. They may not have seen cattle or sheep on the track, but they've seen everything else and they tend to take most things in stride. The majority are also extremely affectionate, forgiving and easy going. They forgive a lot of rider mistakes and they don't appear to hold grudges. They're just so sane. The only thing is you'd have to train them to trot and pace, unless you got a real dud off the track that retired because it kept breaking stride.

    (I'm biased and love Standardbreds, if you couldn't tell)
     
  3. JinxedDream

    JinxedDream Senior Member

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    I still want one but I have no experience with them so that's why I'm hesitant. I tried to find one when I was looking for my TB but there wasn't much out there that was still sound and sane. I found the broken crazy STBs.
     
  4. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Keep at it. Standardbreds are some mighty fine choices to start at in your looking process. They're worked with, fit the bill as far as suitable for his size and have good temperaments. Where I'm at they're not prolific as we're not near any harness tracks. Good luck. It'd be where I'd be looking personally, price is excellent for what you get also which is a huge plus.
     
  5. StarPattern

    StarPattern Senior Member

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    I like to look for the slightly older Standardbred broodmare types. They've had enough time off that they're far from crazy and they're generally cared for so well that they're sound as can be. I pulled my STB out of a broodmare band when she lost her last foal and they didn't want to re-breed her. She was 16 years old or so. Aside from some allergies to dust, she is 100% sound. She's opinionated, but not mean... but she demands respect. For example, she does not respond well to being pushed and I've learned to ask her. If I'm polite, she will give her all. If I get frustrated and I'm a little too liberal with leg pressure, the ears come back and she gives me a quick lesson in patience. Once she's satisfied with how well I learned my lesson, ears come back forward and away we go. I'm sure geldings are more easygoing, but I've always preferred mares and how completely honest and fair they are. If they don't appreciate how you work with them, they will tell you loudly and then you'll learn a better way to cooperate.

    And the price can't be beat. I paid $300 including shipping for a 7 year off track Standie for a project, and paid $600 for Vanna. They were both bred to the nines. The owners just wanted them to have a good home after their careers ended.
     
  6. Bakkir

    Bakkir Senior Member

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    I would look for a well broke ranch horse. One that knows it's job and is unflappable when being worked.

    Colour is always last on the list. Hence, I now own another grey horse.
     
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  7. apndi

    apndi Senior Member

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    What you can find really depends on what's in your area. I don't know much about STBs but QHs and paints are usually good choices. If you're looking for something stocky then I don't think you should cross draft crosses off your list. Gaited horses (I have most experience with walkers) tend to have very good, easy-going temperaments, and walkers are usually quite tall but there are some QH sized ones out there. But, I don't think you should look at breed as much--look at easy going temperaments, that's more important than breed in general.
     
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  8. JinxedDream

    JinxedDream Senior Member

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    I'm fairly certain those don't exist near here. I have a 3 hour driving limit on what I can shop for.

    Gaited horses are hard to find in Ontario but not off my list. I guess I will just have to look and see. The budget is a bit limited so I'm hoping to wait for a bit to save up more cash to increase what I can buy.
     
  9. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    Yup, that is what Gibbs was, the kids had grown, not many visitors, so he was kind of sitting, too laid back to be a real good working horse, but the best husband, or timid large woman wanting a quiet life, horse ever.

    I would look at a stocky QH type if they are available, can get some great ones.
     
  10. Bakkir

    Bakkir Senior Member

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    Keep saving while you look.

    There are ranches in Manitoba that sell to Ontario regularly. That's where I would start looking. Call around and ask what is available for a novice rider.

    I don't know if you are near Carson's horse auction, but they have a sale on Sept 9th. Says there will be well broke lesson horses there from a ranch. Horse Auctions | David Carson Farms & Auction Services Ltd.
     

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