How to kill a horse

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by Aricia, Jun 9, 2012.

  1. Aricia

    Aricia Senior Member+

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    The past couple weeks I have discovered a new way to kill a horse. Take a weanling, give it the best feed and care possible, let it grow up and eventually (maybe) start it under saddle... In the meantime, make sure the horse has an ultra safe turnout spot no bigger than a round pen. Make sure there are no outside distractions to scare the poor thing.

    Allow time to pass. NEVER change it's schedule or turnout buddy.

    Insert life changing event and decide to get rid of the horse who has never been off property, never trailered, never felt ANY change in it's life.

    Expect horse to be just fine in new, different surroundings.

    Horse is now dangerously afraid of anything different, shakes and shivers with fear, runs through fences to get away from horses in ANOTHER field.... stresses weight off like it is being liposuctioned.

    For the love of whatever you deem holy, EDUCATE your horses and expose them to new, different and scary things! You cannot predict life and it's not fair to the horse to be bubble wrapped it's whole life. A horse will be euthanized because of a lack of acceptance to new and different things. It disgusts me and is150% remedied.

    Ugh. I hate people sometimes.
     
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  2. Ambrose

    Ambrose Senior Member+

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    Very true - a horse almost never has only one owner throughout its life so we can't raise them to live in a bubble. This happen to a horse you know, I'm guessing? :(
     
  3. tata77

    tata77 Senior Member+

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    To whoever does that to a horse, I'm going to play baseball with them where they are the ball and the bat is a bus. >_>
     
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  4. KW Farms

    KW Farms Senior Member+

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    Why does it have to be euthanized? It would take a lot of time and a good trainer, but it can be trained...unless there's some sort of mental disability with it? You can take a horse with no human contact whatsoever and turn it into a well trained, rideable animal...this horse sounds no different. It's a shame it's owner is choosing to put it down rather then putting some time into it.
     
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  5. Ambrose

    Ambrose Senior Member+

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    There might be more to it - we don't know, so I'd like to hear the story of what happened. It might have been so stressed that it colicked badly or tore itself up in a fence, for instance.
     
  6. slc

    slc Senior Member+

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    Agree with KW in that I don't see any real reason to have the horse euthenized, in fact it sounds overly dramatic to me.

    I've seen several horses that were extremely isolated for many years, and had extremely limited experience with anything. They all came around. Some became school horses, others, kid's horses, and some, eventers or dressage horses.

    Perhaps someone is in too much of a hurry to pinhook this horse and get some money out of him?

    Or someone has got to be incredibly inflexible in how they handle horses, and won't allow the horse time to settle in or desensitize.

    Sounds like a pointless taking of a life and sounds more like soomeone doesn't like having horses kept a certain way rather than a problem whose only solution is euthenasia.

    As far as true isolation, I've seen a wide variety of people, from Amish neighbors to professional trainers to teenage girls to myself, fix such horses. I know of one of our internationally medaled GP dressage riders picked up a horse like this - it had hardly been touched. After a few months of training, it was absolutely fine.

    In fact when I was barely 16 I was working with a horse that had been very badly handled, isolated as well as abused when it was brought 'back to the world'. Yeah it was pretty jumpy. But with a couple month's work the horse was fine.

    If a horse is extremely anxious due to isolation, it can be given a long acting sedative while it gets more accustomed to things, though in none of the cases I've seen, was any medication needed. It might be if the horse is in danger of banging itself into something. Being calmer tends to become a habit. Halfway decent handling and a little extra time will take care of the problems.

    And sorry, no, we're full. But as I emphasized repeatedly, this is not something that is difficult, nor is it a problem that requires more than minimal experience and a modicum of patience. It just takes a little while, and just about anyone who is willing to commit themselves to doing so, can fix such a horse. It's just a matter of dropping the dogmatism and doing what works.
     
  7. Arem

    Arem Senior Member+

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    I would not so quickly criticize this horse being euthanized with a description like is quoted above. What horse runs through fences to get away from other horses? Not at all normal. Fixable? Maybe, maybe not, but what further damage has the horse done to himself because of his fear? What damage might he do the human who might try to help him?

    This is not like a mustang taken from the wild. A mustang has exposure to other horses, the environment, and "scary" things (to a point, at least). They have not been sheltered like this horse has.

    If, when I have more experience, I came across a horse like this, I might try to help as much as I could (depending on my experience level and actually seeing the horse), but not everyone is equipped to handle that. It could take a very long time, and it's possible the horse may not even be reachable.

    It's such a shame.:(
     
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  8. trails2rails

    trails2rails Senior Member+

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    I've dealt with horses like that - and it's far kinder to the horse to euthanize than to terrorize it daily in "training" sessions. Mustangs/wild unhandled 4yo's who grew up in a herd already know how to properly interact with a leader/skilled human handler/other horses.

    In this type of case, the horse can be so in the "flight" mode that they are self destructive. One mare I'm thinking of, jumped over a 5' fence as though it was a 4'6" fence, broke a leg but was so terrified that she was in a pen now with other horses that she then went through the next fence, got out on the highway, and then we finally caught up to her in a cattle guard. It would have been much kinder if that rescue had her PTS the day she arrived rather than try to "gentle" and "tame" her. She was already gentle and tame, great around people. Scared of life. We tried putting her back in the same type of environment she was in before, but her brain was fried. There was no settling her, she was at that point "broken."

    I'm not sure if this is the same type of deal as the OP - but I can believe quite easily that sometimes it is far kinder to the horse to have it PTS than trained.
     
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  9. Rockyhorse

    Rockyhorse Senior Member+

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    You need a license to cut someone's hair but you can breed horse's to live a "puppy mill" life all you want. Yeah, that makes sense.
     
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  10. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member+

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    Not knowing what happened I'm guessing the horse ran through the fence and had to be euthanized. Ace is your friend in these instances. I would have aced him off and on for a few weeks until he stopped shaking. Replicating his old home for the first little while and then slowly exposing him to more and more new experiences would have gotten him used to real life a bit more slowly and he may have been able to adjust.
     
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