How often do you show? How do you afford it?

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by monte26, Mar 16, 2019 at 9:00 PM.

  1. monte26

    monte26 Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2019
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    2
    I’m wondering for amateurs/juniors , how often do you show?
    I did my very first show today in the jumpers and had so much fun. I had some mess ups, but I feel like if I don’t show for months those rusty spots will just get even worse. However, I’m 17 and so I don’t have much money to throw around since college is soon. If you guys show often how do you afford it? The shows around me cost so much because of the shipping (combined I think this show today is putting me back $600 about). I’m not complaining, I LOVE showing so much and I put a lot of work into horses out of the ring, so it’s a way to display that hard work. Thanks for any answers and advice you have!
     
  2. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    16,746
    Likes Received:
    12,420
    Welcome Monte, nice to meet you. It's been years, but it was just a part of the process. I also didn't have the higher costs there are now.

    You hit the high points and work with your trainers advice as to where to go, what to do if you're working on breed points. It is imperative to have a trainer you trust though, that's probably a lot of the battle. If you don't trust their advice or instinct, back away and ask here or other unbiased professionals.

    It is not cheap. If you're campaigning a stallion or mare in breed shows, it's very important. For all other things, it's still important, but with different motivations. Watch out for grifty trainers, they're rampant. Ask around here, there are PM's without besmirching anyone publicly, but easier on the pocketbook.
     
  3. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

    Joined:
    May 4, 2011
    Messages:
    1,226
    Likes Received:
    996
    What is a grifty trainer?

    I am getting back into showing with my OTTB. He is young and we are new to eventing so we will be sticking with schooling shows for quite a while which are cheaper. We also have our own farm and trailer so we don't pay for hauling or board. Schooling show runs about $140 per show and there are 5 a year.
     
    Alsosusieq2 likes this.
  4. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    16,746
    Likes Received:
    12,420
    A grifty trainer is one that promotes other things that are on "their" agenda, be it whatever it is, anything, but it's usually money in training fees etc over your natural abilities. In other words, you best trainers.. you will think are your worst enemies at times because they're brutally honest. Reality. They're not at lower or even mid level though. They'll tell you straight up what's what.

    Beware of any that try and push saddles, horses or any garbage. Get a second opinion. It's usually the rider 80% of the time.

    The grift is perpetuating the students in a cycle, not "really" helping them.

    Ask here. We've people doing competitive cross country, dressage, etc. You're not at a loss when up against bs.. and bs is thick in the horse industry.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2019 at 12:05 AM
  5. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

    Joined:
    May 4, 2011
    Messages:
    1,226
    Likes Received:
    996
    Sounds like some trainers I went through as a kid that would never let me go past 2'6 because I didn't have my own horse. I'm 28 years old and have been riding for 20 years perpetually stuck at 2'6. I wouldn't say I'm stuck with Henry quite yet as we're still doing 2 foot.
     
  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    25,110
    Likes Received:
    15,483
    Here are some suggestions
    1. Focus on lessons and clinics instead of showing.
    2. Treat shows as a learning experience rather than 'points chasing.'
    3. Make goals that don't require much showing to meet. For example, in dressage, there were specific scores our trainer said we had to hit in specific movements before we could move up. The goal was to move up one level a year, so we had to hit a specific score in the more 'riderly' movements. Similarly, you could have a goal for your hunter jumper education.
    4. Go to shows that are nearby. They may not be as good a match for your level of riding and the judging might not be as good, but initially, much of showing is just getting used to the routine and learning to deal with show nerves.
    5. Go to fewer shows a year. Some mix of nearby shows and perhaps only one a year that is really strategic, picking one show that will help you improve your skills by getting you in front of really good judges and letting you watch more advanced competitors warm up and show.
    6. Go to some of the bigger shows without your horse and just watch, just sit and watch the better riders and pick up some useful ideas. You might even go as a groom and get paid, but you would probably not have as much time to just sit and watch.
    7. Enter fewer classes at the shows, keeping your expenses down.
    8. Consider a working student position in the summer, so you can get in some time around a more advanced competitor and learn from that, ride some green horses and get a stronger seat, so when you do show, you meet your goals more easily in fewer shows.
    9. Trailer with another student and share the shipping expenses, instead of having your trainer or a commercial outfit haul your horse for $2 a mile.
    10. Work at shows you ride at. You could braid manes or clean tack at night and make some money to recoup some of your expenses.
    11. Sleep in the horse trailer or bring along a tent instead of staying at a hotel.
    12. If shopping at show vendors's booths is a problem, leave your checks and credit card at home.
    13. Pack your meals at home and don't go out to restaurants during the show or in the evenings.
    Each one of these has advantages and disadvantages, so not all are going to work for everyone.

    When I was showing I had specific goals and could only afford 1-2 shows a year. So I worked out how to meet my goals and do it with fewer shows.
     
    mkoktavy and bobo and horses like this.
  7. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

    Joined:
    May 4, 2011
    Messages:
    1,226
    Likes Received:
    996
  8. Pony123

    Pony123 Full Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2014
    Messages:
    1,032
    Likes Received:
    1,213
    I show maybe 3-4 times a year, all schooling or local shows. I don't really show for points or anything, but it's nice to see how you are doing in relation to other riders around and I love the overall experience of the show day. It runs around 200$ per show with shipping/ entry fees. I don't have my own horse anymore so I ride my trainers horses.
     
  9. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2007
    Messages:
    3,637
    Likes Received:
    5,202
    I personally don’t show anymore. But, I serve as groom to my daughters when they show. Love it. No stress for me, lol.

    Cant make it every show, but I do go to at least 4 or 5, including one over the 4th of July that is a week. We take the travel trailer and it ends up sort of a family reunion.
     
    Rhythm 'n Blues and Alsosusieq2 like this.
  10. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2007
    Messages:
    20,308
    Likes Received:
    17,870
    I don't show every year. I mean, I would if I was also so lucky as to have a mount ready to enter....

    When I show, I commit to a minimum of 3 shows. That allows me to qualify for year end awards. My feelings are that, if you're going to do something, do it well enough to have a chance to qualify, or at least get the marks needed for your medals (or whatever you're pushing to achieve in regards to personal growth). (y)

    I own my own trailer, but have to borrow a truck. It's been a few years since I was able to be in the ring, but each show costs me about $250 - that included my gas and entry fees, but did not include all my yearly membership requirements, or the costs to get my trailer on the road each year. The plan is to show again this year (fingers crossed White Wonder is ready for this!). I will start at the local venue (still recognized Silver level competition) and if things go well, I may hit up a Gold level show at the big big show-scene later on in the year. That big show will be a big-money show! I'll need a hotel for myself, stall for pony, and it's a multi-day show plus entries will be much higher. Oh and of course gas will be more given it's much further away.

    I will say this though - if I don't have the funds to show, I would NOT be showing. Which means if I can't commit to the costs of my 3 show minimum, any additional available funds would be better off used to further our education & partnership. So I'd be doing clinics, and fun days instead. That's just my own personal beliefs & how I make the decision. I also refuse to pay to show the same horse at the same level 2 years in a row. To me that is a waste of money, though I know people who show the same level year after year after year & only see a 5% increase in scores over a 5-6 year time frame. If that was happening to me, I would need to seriously take a step back and go WHAT is wrong with my training regime?!?
     

Share This Page