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How Much Lunging

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by horse_mom, Feb 17, 2017.

  1. horse_mom

    horse_mom Senior Member

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    I have a coming three year old filly that I am trying to keep consistent with, or as consistent as I can with getting rain and then mud for four or five days out of the week :confused: I have started her ground driving, just about 10-15 minutes at a time of walking, turning and stopping. I hand walk her all over the ranch, through the river bed, down the road to see scary animals and such. When the ground dries up a bit I pony her out with my other horse and we can trot a little bit. I try not to lunge her a lot because I don't want to stress her joints but quite often that is all that I can do due to conditions besides turning her out in the arena to run around like an idiot. I'm going to have her started under saddle lightly towards summer but I would like to have her ground work 100% before she goes. What else can I do with her to get her listening and learning but not ruin her?

    She's also very herd bound and attached to me so if I turn her out and walk away to do something else she whinnies and runs around until I come back, and screams for the horses that are maybe 15ft away:rolleyes: Anything to help her with this?

    And because she is a cute moose:
     

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  2. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Not really but she sure is cute.;)
     
  3. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

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    Time tied up alone, and leave her in overnight by herself on occasion.
     
  4. CodyChrome

    CodyChrome Full Member

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    Learning to stand quiet and alone, is a big part of my training program. Thus, after you work her, I would tie her in a safe place, alone. As that horse learns to accept that tying, being separated, it does wonders far as confidence and in preventing a horse form being herd sour
    I know of many training barns, where that time spent tied, is a routine part of the program. While many people skip a horse learning to accept being tied solid, just ground trying a horse, tying him only while they are there, all those methods are important additional skills, but not a substitute for tying solid
    I ground tie my horses also, grooming, saddling, setting u a trail course, ect, but they also tie solid.
    If your filly has lots of turn out, I would not worry about too much formal exercise, and you are right not to lunge a young horse too much
    Some trainers also rather have a young horse that has been little handled, versus one perhaps taught some habits they have to un do-not saying you are doing that
    If your filly leads with respect,knowing how to lunge, tie, is good with feet, knows basics like yielding her hips,then I would not worry too much about ground work, as your program for that can be way different then that of the trainers
     
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  5. horse_mom

    horse_mom Senior Member

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    Does she have to be completely unable to view the other horses? I'm trying to think of a place I can tie her where she can't see anyone. She does tie well.

    I'm lucky that my trainer and I have the same training mentality and he has taught me a lot! He's only starting her for me as a favor due to my back already being broken once and I am not wanting to get on a 3 year old as big as her, its a long fall!

    Thank you for your tips!
     
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  6. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Take her around the back of the barn or someplace where she's alone, tie her with a hay bag. Go sit down. Tie her for 15 min and don't let her off until she's quiet. If she's fussing, leave her there until she rests a hind leg and gives a nice sigh and relaxes. Then go take her off the tie. Do this every day. Before long, you can tie her and she will not stress. As she gets better at it, you walk a little out of the picture and stay out of the picture until she's quiet.

    Ground driving is WAY better than lunging. Too hard on the joints. Young horses condition up well in spring, so I wouldn't stress about keeping her fit over winter, just interact with her and advance her ground work and in hand handling along with manners and patience. That's enough.
     
  7. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    We would separate the horses to feed them. They quickly got the idea - separation = food. Not sad, glad.

    How much longeing?

    None. Especially since she looks like a draft cross.
     
  8. CJ

    CJ Senior Member

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    Not a fan of tying, and please dont leave her unattended if you do. Loose in a stall works as well imo, without the 1 yank or freakout from disaster fear.
    Is she screaming at horses while youre trying to work her? Shes not focused on what shes doing with you then; tug & reprimand, and readdress what you expect her to do.
    A horse that will come running up to you is not herdbound imo, but interested in your attention and what you might do with her. Herdbound or work sour would be hard to catch.
    When you walk, are you working on her rein cues and ground manners, stops and turns and manners? You can do a Lot with ground work, before or without ever getting on the back, including tacking up and getting them used to bridle & bit, plus control cues. Long before I got on my friends grown mare for 1st time, she Knew what rein cues for stop and turns were all about.
    A round pen can be good for liberty work, without all the stress of being on an line and lunged. They dont have the restriction of diameter and tendency to lean loose in a pen that they do on a line. And cues and cooperation have to be good, because without a line on its your voice and their attitude, maybe some body language that determines whether round pen work is an effective exercise, or just a horse going Completely NASCAR in there.
     
  9. horse_mom

    horse_mom Senior Member

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    I can leave her tied and walk around the other side of the round pen to my trailer, and she is fine besides being noisy until I am back. She screams if I am not with her/doing something with her.
    When I ground drive her I have a simple snaffle on her but I have my reins attached to a side pull so she is used to carrying a bit but is getting directed by her nose still. She knows "walk", "whoa", "stand", "back" and turns left and right and will walk over poles/ weave through cones, whatever isn't boring. Generally when I am done with driving I will attach reins to the bit and flex her with the side pull at a stand and then slowly start asking with the side pull and snaffle and now we respond to left/right and a little whoa with a snaffle but I rarely use it at this point. She's used to a surcingle or a driving harness (if I'm willing to carry it to the tack area).
     
  10. horse_mom

    horse_mom Senior Member

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    Perch/Andalusion
     

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