How many tons of hay in a tractor trailer?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by JBandRio, Sep 9, 2007.

  1. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member+

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    On average, how much can those guys haul? I'm not talking about number of bales, as weight/bale can vary, but there has to be a limit as to the tonnage they can carry.
     






  2. PeggySue

    PeggySue Senior Member+

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    Found this on a flatbed trailer site

    lightweight flatbed trailer capable of hauling various payloads such as to about 80,000 lbs
     
  3. ryu2832

    ryu2832 Senior Member+

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    My source says 50,000lbs (25 tons).
     
  4. 2horsestoride

    2horsestoride Senior Member+

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    When I priced bringing in a tractor trailer load from Canada last year, the company I was talking with hauled 25 ton per load.
     
  5. kellidahorsegirl

    kellidahorsegirl Senior Member+

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    Round Bales you could get about 22.5 tons (45,000 lbs) ... think grass hay
    Small square bales you could get about 30 tons (60,000 lbs)... grass hay.

    Plus there would be factoring of the legal limits too. The hubby says you're only allowed 50,000 lbs for a cattle pot,,,but thats much different than a hay trailer HAHA
     
  6. Haas Horse Farm

    Haas Horse Farm Senior Member+

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    NO trailer can legally haul more than 80,000 pounds without an overweight permit. That includes the weight of the truck, trailer and load. There are some tri-axle low boy trailers that have to haul more because of the weight of the equipment they carry... i.e. very large tractors or earth movers.

    As far as hay I doubt that you could get a permit to haul more than 80,000 pounds. What are you trying to figure out? Often the height of the stack is more important than the weight. In other words I think you will get limited by height before you are limited by weight.

    Also have to know where it is going as often small two lane roads will have weight limits on bridges...
     
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  7. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member+

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    Thanks, that at least gives me a ballpark figure. I'm desperate desperate for hay and am getting some tomorrow from a friend whom I found out has contracted for several truckloads from up North. I'm just getting my act together to see if it would be feasible for another friend and I to see if we can get our own truckload.
     
  8. 2horsestoride

    2horsestoride Senior Member+

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    Did you look into the delivery cost? That's what killed it for me last year. The hay itself was actually a good price but the delivery cost more than the hay; more than doubling the price. Gas it a bit lower now then when I was shopping, so may not be as big a factor.
     
  9. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member+

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    The stuff my friend is getting right now is $7/square bale (probably in the 40-50lb range), and her next load is $9/bale. Way higher than I've paid in last years since I've been getting 500lb round bales for $20, but desperate times and all... :( There is ZERO hay here :(:(:(
     
  10. PHANTOMCOWGIRL

    PHANTOMCOWGIRL Senior Member

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    alfalfa hay mix here is 12 a bale 50 lb bale
     






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