how do you manage your senior horse?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by trailcreekranch, Mar 29, 2017.

  1. gaitedboomer

    gaitedboomer Senior Member

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    Southern Middle Tennessee, about an hour north of the Alabama border.

    We are an Ag county but Population is still pushing the coyotes to hunt anything weak.

    The farmer whose cow was calving with the two coyotes standing at a distance and waiting, was the person who told me the story or I might not have believed it.

    We even have a lot of Armadillos and they are not common to this area. I've seen several dead on the busier roads and saw one along my chain link fence a few months back.
     
  2. doublelranch

    doublelranch Senior Member

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    Around here they just look like they are waiting on a calf. They are actually waiting to get a tasty placenta or two. We got a donkey to take care of the critters:D
     
  3. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    I wouldn't think they'd actually go after a calf. I think they misunderstood what they were about. In sixty years I've never seen them go after larger game. It was unfortunate that this thought was spread around as people killed off a lot of coyotes because of it. That's not them. Now, if a calf has died, they'd probably eat on a carcass. They're not that kind of predator. I actually like them a lot. It'd be almost like thinking foxes were attacking calves. Coyotes are small, they're not about to mess with cattle.
     
  4. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Exactly. They're not about to tangle with a calf and a momma. They're small and not really aggressive. Now chickens, that's more their style, but they kind of stay away from domestic animals anyway as humans are usually around. Foxes are more likely to stealth in on chickens. I've never seen a coyote in sixty years do a misstep. I'd be more concerned for rabies if I saw a coyote near people openly, they're shy.
     
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  5. gaitedboomer

    gaitedboomer Senior Member

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    Coyotes do a get a lot of bad TV press for walking off with someone's Pomeranian up in "The Rural" of fancy Brentwood.

    The farmers, at least the ones on my road, shoot them almost on sight.

    The only way I would shoot one would be if it was acting distempered; it's the two-legged critters skulking around after dark who need to worry, lollol

    Our entire property is fenced with a locked driveway gate. If someone's at the house or barn they had to work hard, with criminal intent, to do that and that means I take aim, lol
     
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  6. touchofdandy

    touchofdandy Senior Member

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    My geldings almost 20 and 8ish both get senior feed, blanketed in the winter when needed, pasture/grass mix hay. Teeth taken care of etc. I don't do anything special except give senior feed to the 8 year old and that is due to his permanent nerve damage to the side of his face. Senior feed is easy for him to eat with a bit of water added to it and keeps him in good shape otherwise he would be really skinny. Sounds like you are doing great with your horses. :)
     
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  7. Binca

    Binca Senior Member

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    My oldest is 23. He currently lives in a paddock by himself (although with a horse he knows well on either side). The paddock almost has grass year round, although I suspect a less rainy summer than the one we just had would dry it out a lot more. But he also gets a lot of hay to top that up. He doesn't get round bales because he can't eat them fast enough to stop them going moldy. I tried last month but with all the rain we had he just wasn't getting through it and a lot of it was wasted. So now every day I fill large chaff bags with hay from my mare's round bale and feed that to him instead.

    He doesn't get much hard feed because his weight is actually really good. I add a powdered vitamin/mineral supplement to a small amount of chaff and rice bran pellets. He is doing really well on it.

    I'm just about to start riding him again more too. I haven't had the time due to placement, so apart from my mother in law plodding around on him once a week he has been out of work and has lost more muscle than normal for him - I guess that comes with getting older though.

    I always keep a close eye on him. He did panic my mother in law the other day. She called me almost in tears because she had gone up to ride him, found him lying down, put his halter on, and he refused to get up. He got up while she was telling me this. I asked if he was in the sun. Yes she said. And he was happily eating a carrot she was holding. He was fine. Just didn't want to get up from his nap in the sun - it isn't the first time he has tried that on someone!
     
  8. trailcreekranch

    trailcreekranch Full Member

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    Thank you everyone! Such great information! We also have real healthy coyote packs, but so far not problems. I think it is because we live in such a wilderness area that they have plenty of wild game to hunt for that would be easier than fighting with our cows or horses! We thought about getting a donkey for protection but I worry the thing would also kill my dogs! I've heard they will!

    I haven't been a member here too long, but I just have to say that everyone is so helpful! It is so appreciated!
     
  9. doublelranch

    doublelranch Senior Member

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    They don't care if it's your neighbor's dog or yours. If they get ahold of it, yup, it could be too late. Anything smaller than the donkey is fair game for a butt whooping. You can accustom the donk to your animals, and train your dogs to stay clear. One of my dogs play fights with my donk through the fence, and they both enjoy it. The donk will only half-heartedly go after my dogs if they go in his pasture. He bluffs pretty well. The neighbor's dogs? They run screaming with tail tucked. The donk is not playing with them at all, but I haven't lost a single chicken or turkey since I've had him.
    PART_1383630201445_CAM01589-1-1.jpg
     
  10. equinitis

    equinitis Senior Member

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    Coyotes are not typically a problem for livestock bigger than a chicken but will take advantage if a larger animal is not able to get up. They are big cowards for the mostly. They will kill young animals if their mother doesn't stick up for them, including sheep, goats, cattle and equines. A protective mother at lease as large as a coyote is pretty successful at running them off.
    Donks and mules can and do accept dogs and other animals. My own donks and mules don't bother my dogs at all although they have killed two of my barn cats. They regularly kill coyotes also. I think the young ones, coyotes, don't understand how dangerous the equines are until it is too late sometimes. Mules and donks can be hard on calves and sheep, guardian donks are bred to be guardian donks and using an animal not bred and raised with that purpose in mind can be a carp shoot. Sometimes they guard and sometimes the kill what they are supposed to be guarding. They are VERY territorial, that's what makes the good guardians.
     

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