How do you make iodine wash?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Tori*AKA*WooHoo, Sep 17, 2007.

  1. Tori*AKA*WooHoo

    Tori*AKA*WooHoo Senior Member

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    My farrier said to put iodine wash on my horses leg to treat fungus that is starting. my mom and i realized that we didn't know how to make it and we can't find anything online. does anyone know how to make it? (how much iodine to how many parts water. we need it to be the perfect amount so it is no to strong and not diluted) thanks
     






  2. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member+

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    What is this "fungus" and how did the farrier diagnose it?

    Is the horse's leg white? Are there scabs, or greasy sections, or what? How you might treat one isn't necessarily how you'd treat the other.

    But if you insist ;) I would use water and betadine (NOT IODINE!!!) to make a very weat tea looking solution and squirt that on and rub then rinse. Or, in a bucket of sudsy water, add a squirt of betadine.
     
  3. Tori*AKA*WooHoo

    Tori*AKA*WooHoo Senior Member

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    Yes she has white legs. The farrier noticed it and she has scabs. He said to use the wash. When I said iodine I was referring to the generic brand of betadine.[SIZE=-1]Povidone Iodine Solution-generic betadine.[/SIZE] I've just never had to make a wash before and I just wanted to make sure it wasn't to diluted with water.:D
     
  4. sorrell

    sorrell Senior Member+

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    If it is betadine, you can put it on straight, with a sponge and then wet the sponge, rub it in, let it sit for a few minutes and wash it out. The big thing is to keep the area dry as it is the moisture that encourages the fungus to grow.
    In a pinch, I have rubbed in betadine and let it sit until the next day and then brushed it out.
     
  5. Tori*AKA*WooHoo

    Tori*AKA*WooHoo Senior Member

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    Just thought of one more question. How often should I do this wash and for how long?:D
     
  6. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member+

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    Since you are really dealing with scratches/mud fever/dew poisoning, do a search on those and you'll find some good advice :)
     
  7. Morri

    Morri Senior Member+

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    Scratches, dew poisoning vs ringworm from the Merck Manual
    Merck Veterinary Manual
    Scratches
    (Greasy heel, Dermatitis verrucosa)[​IMG]
    Scratches is a chronic, seborrheic dermatitis characterized by hypertrophy and exudation on the caudal surface of the pastern and fetlock. It often is associated with poor stable hygiene, but no specific cause is known. Heavy horses are particularly susceptible, and the hindlimbs are affected more commonly. Standardbreds frequently are affected in the spring when tracks are wet. The common use of limestone on racetracks has been associated with scratches.Scratches may go unnoticed if hidden by the “feather” at the back of the pastern. The skin is itchy, sensitive, and swollen during the acute stages; later, it becomes thickened and most of the hair is lost. Only the shorter hairs remain, and these stand erect. The surface of the skin is soft, and the grayish exudate has a fetid odor. The condition can become chronic, with vegetative granulomas. Lameness may or may not be present; it can be severe and associated with generalized cellulitis of the limb. As the condition progresses, there is thickening and hardening of the skin of the affected regions, with rapid hypertrophy of subcutaneous fibrous tissue.Persistent and aggressive treatment is usually successful. This consists of removing the hair, regular washing and cleansing with warm water and soap to remove all soft exudate, drying, and applying an astringent dressing. If granulomas appear, they should be cauterized. Cellulitis requires systemic antibiotic therapy and tetanus prophylaxis.

    Merck Veterinary Manual
    Trichophyton equinum and T mentagrophytes are the primary causes of ringworm in horses, although Microsporum gypseum , M canis , and T verrucosum have also been isolated. Clinical signs consist of one or more patches of alopecia and erythema, scaling, and crusting, which are present to varying degrees. Early lesions may resemble papular urticaria but progress with crusting and hair loss within a few days. Diagnosis is confirmed by culture. Differential diagnoses include dermatophilosis, pemphigus foliaceus, and bacterial folliculitis. Transmission is by direct contact or by grooming implements and tack. Most lesions are seen in the saddle and girth areas (‘‘girth itch’’).Treatment is generally topical because systemic therapy is expensive and of unproven efficacy. Whole-body rinses as described above for cattle may be recommended, and individual lesions treated with clotrimazole or miconazole preparations. Grooming implements and tack should be disinfected, and affected horses should be isolated.
     
    Jess! and Xiphias like this.
  8. HUS_WP_lovr

    HUS_WP_lovr Senior Member+

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    Scratches is bacterial, right and her farrier said it was fungus. I am confused.
     
  9. Xiphias

    Xiphias Senior Member+

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    I used to have a iodine based soap, called Weladol, that was great for fungus, and bacterial stuff, we used it for ringworm...Cathy
     
  10. Jess!

    Jess! Senior Member+

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    If Scratches are bacterial than the betadine will help :) When Anna lost her tail two vets diagnosed it as fungal, but only when we started treating it as bacterial did it clear up with the betadine.
     






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