How do you keep your hoses and troughs from freezing??

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by montyxk, Oct 24, 2010.

  1. montyxk

    montyxk Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2010
    Messages:
    538
    Likes Received:
    6
    Ok the first snow is supposed to hit here in UT tomorrow and I am dreading the next few months of dealing with frozen hoses and frozen water troughs. My barn is about 200 ft from my water and power since we didn't get the underground lines run this year (next spring for SURE!). Too far to haul water in buckets to my 3 horses all winter, and no power out there to run a trough heater. So I need some advice on how to keep my hose and troughs from freezing up. Bring on your best tips and tricks!
     






  2. EasternCowgirl

    EasternCowgirl Full Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2010
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    15
    Yow! Sorry to hear that!! We still have another month or so. Stay warm!!

    Is there any possibility of running a long extension out for the trough, in order to heat it? Other than that, insulation, running water, and an ice pick is all I can think of from keeping it completely frozen.

    As long as you drain your hose after you use it, you ~should~ be fine (knock on wood!).
     
  3. mamaalwaysrides

    mamaalwaysrides Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2006
    Messages:
    3,962
    Likes Received:
    314
    last year, I put a fish tank heater in my tank and it kept the tank from freezing, of course I live in central cali, and it only freezes on top of the water, but it did the trick and kept the horses drinking their water, you do have to make sure they cannot get to the electric wire though, I covered the wire with pvc pipe, and it worked great, SORRY DIDN'T READ THE PART ABOUT NO ELECTRICITY, SORRY NO IDEAS HERE
     
  4. FaeriesFaith

    FaeriesFaith Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2008
    Messages:
    666
    Likes Received:
    493
    We run a long long long extension cord out to the trough for the heater and the hoses are drained, rolled and brought inside until we need them to fill the troughs, then they're dragged outside, hooked up long enough to fill the tanks and then brought back in again. If I could though I'd just leave them rolled in a cupboard in the barn with a space heater like we do at work (the kind that if you tip em over or they reach a certain tempature they auto shut off)
     
  5. WilsonF

    WilsonF Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2009
    Messages:
    3,821
    Likes Received:
    1,011

    Ditto to all of this.
     
  6. prettyqtrs

    prettyqtrs Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2004
    Messages:
    5,868
    Likes Received:
    347
    There are heaters in the stock tanks, and extension cords are run from the heaters to the electric outlets. Hoses 'live' outside, the night before tanks needs to be filled the hoses get brought into the house to thaw out. Its a pain in the hide, but it works. :)
     
  7. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2005
    Messages:
    65,634
    Likes Received:
    29,947
    Hoses get hooked up to fill tubs, then unhooked and drained when done. Not just "water is off, hose is unhooked" drained, but starting at one end, raising it and walking the whole length to drain it all. I leave them laying as straight as possible, in as much sun as possible.

    I would be leary of running 200' of extension cord. 50-75', sure, heavy duty (always always heavy duty). 200', not so sure.

    There are many plans out there for building a plywood box around the tub, leaving space which you can fill with insulation or, some people fill it with manure which releases heat as it decomposes. You also cover most of the top of the tub, as that slows evaporation which slows cooling.
     
  8. Mnhorsemom

    Mnhorsemom Full Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Messages:
    179
    Likes Received:
    30
    I have the 150 gallon Rubbermaid trough and keep the heater that goes in the drain hole going for the winter. Could you run a cord for a heater? You would have to make sure it's a HEAVY DUTY grounded cord. As far as the hose when I am done with mine I start at one end hold it up high and go hand over hand and let it drain. You just have to make sure you go slow and get it drained good. I have also seen heated hoses at our Fleet Farm store but they would be pretty spendy for 200 feet.
     
  9. belle4

    belle4 Senior Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2003
    Messages:
    11,069
    Likes Received:
    4,769
    You are going to have to heat your tank. The water will freeze solid and then you will have a mess. I'd run a heavy duty extension cord for the electric and drain the hose and store it in the house.
     
  10. Sunrisepony

    Sunrisepony Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2010
    Messages:
    2,311
    Likes Received:
    374
    Insulate your hoses and pipes with some foam pipe insulation. As for your water tank, you can either leave it running just enough that it is alwasy over flowing (the motion will keep it from freezing, which is why rivers never freeze. they are always moving). Or if you do chose to run an power cord. Make sure you go to your local Lowes or Home Depot, and get an EXTERRIOR Commercial rated 200' cord. They are usually yellow. You also want to make sure you don't lay it anywhere near or on any type of grass or vegitation. Cement is best or pure dirt.
     






Share This Page