How bad is Clover?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by bay_blnd jmpr07, Sep 16, 2009.

  1. bay_blnd jmpr07

    bay_blnd jmpr07 Senior Member+

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    Mars has access to clover 24/7.

    He slobbers A LOT. When he starts to chew (like the submissive chewing (he does this all the time when he first come over and pet him)) massive amounts of slobber just poor out.

    Pretty much any mouth movement not eating related causes him too slobber.

    He has access to water at all times.

    Can too much slobber be a bad thing?
     






  2. Native Winds

    Native Winds Senior Member+

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    Clover it self is not a problem. Clover is a legume and a very good one at that. Red clover (few types) is often fed as a legume to horses and has a right place in legume feeding esp as a blend with other grasses. It can contain just as much nutrition as top alfalfa. I have fed Red clover many times in the past and its still fed today. There are various types of clovers that are either pasture varieties and some which are called or considered "weed" type.

    Now Alsike clover (white clover buds usualy alot smaller and more bunched up in areas of the feild and is considered as weed type) is natorious for carrying a fungus ( Rhizoctonia leguminicola fungus ) that causes horses to slober (aka slobber disease) or salivate excessively. The "toxin" (realy a mycotoxin) or "irritant" causes the sub lingual or salivary glands to go into over drive thus the slobber. Red Clover can carry this fungus also and its usualy seen in humid areas of the country esp when rain has been abundant like it has been here.. ( mostly on the eastern side of the country) But your alsike clover is aBIG carrier and harborer of this fungus. Its not good to allow heavy grazing on such clovers and should be limited. Its less of a problem after the first frost. Some times you will see black spots on the leaves of such infected clovers.

    YOu have white clover and yellow clover that arent realy noted for containing the fungus that causes the salivation and are called "fungal resistant". But if the clovers are mixed it is not guaranteed not to affect those such clovers. Scientist have now come up with a red clover version that is also fungal resistant. Red clover is much longer than alsike, of course with red buds, broader leaves and longer stems. It is a nitrogen fixer as most legumes are and are often grown with other hay or pasture crops to aid in nitrogen content in the soils. (ie soy, alfalfa, lespedeza, birdfoot trefoil and other are also nitrogen fixers.) You will see red clover and white clover on the medians of freshly laid soil on road ways. Alfalfa can also carry the fungus.

    Now there is Sweet clover toxicity and its caused by spoiled moldy clover and even birds foot trefoil. Its found in silage, round bales esp if kept outside, wet square bales and etc. It causes anti clotting and vit. K deficientcy.



    Take a gander at this site for more indepth information.
    http://www.midsouthhorsereview.com/articles/2005/08/10/news/news06.txt
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2009
  3. BettyBootsy

    BettyBootsy Banned

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    We have had Red Clover heavily mixed in our pastures for the last yr. My problem wasn't the slobbers as much as it was making them too fat. I've kind of noticed that they slobber more coming towards fall then any other time of the yr. Maybe thats just me but I've noticed that with mine. I'm kind of glad I moved a month ago. Mine have now sheded a few needed lbs. It's awesome to put some weight on one tho. :)
     
  4. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member+

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    Clover slobbers will go away when the conditions aren't conducive for the fungus to grow on the clover ;)

    As long as he's drinking enough, the only danger is to you ;)
     
  5. bay_blnd jmpr07

    bay_blnd jmpr07 Senior Member+

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    That's what I always heard.

    We had a feed rep come into work last night (she was going to help give a wild bird seminar with a bird guy) and we started carrying this brand last fall. We started talking horse and looking at her company's feeds and we were trying to educate our store's resident dog expert.

    We talked about saliva and I mentioned clover and then laughed about my horse literally drooling. And she goes "Yes, and that's not good." :confused:

    I had never heard drooling to be dangerous, especially when water is readily available at all times.
     

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