Horse that is very hot on the trails.

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by Corgiequestrian, Jan 4, 2019.

  1. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2012
    Messages:
    7,191
    Likes Received:
    9,064
    Have you noticed a change in her behaviour when she is in heat? Maybe it is hormonal? Might be worth a thorough vet check up.
     
  2. Faster Horses

    Faster Horses Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2011
    Messages:
    5,612
    Likes Received:
    13,917
    How far is it to the barn that has lessons? If there's a good trail there, can you hand walk her over?
     
  3. slc

    slc Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    25,096
    Likes Received:
    15,472
    I think it helps if the person responds with what they can or can't do. Then others can make other suggestions. A person doesn't automatically mean to be unpleasant just because they can't do something a poster suggests.
     
    Blue-Roan, NaeNae and foxtrot like this.
  4. NaeNae

    NaeNae Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2009
    Messages:
    2,570
    Likes Received:
    2,763
    I've read the entire thread and am replying because I went through lit.er.al.y the exact same thing with my mare. In a very similar situation.

    She was 7/8 QH cross, I was 16? Around there. My first horse, and I did have a decent amount of "experience" but with calm, older, more broke horses. I had her at a barn where I could road ride on quiet roads, about 30 minutes to a small creek/park. I tried to road ride with her but got this exact behavior. The stopping, balking, refusal to go anywhere but backwards (we dangerously flew back into 3 foot deep ditches because she was so resistant to going anywhere but back to the barn), semi rears, all of it and more.

    I did some hand walks out but not as many as I could have. I could have hand grazed her every 10 feet down the road. Made it relaxing. But I wanted to get on a ride, I was a child who dreamed of adventuring on my horse with the wind in our hair. And I got frustrated and she got frustrated and all it did was end in tears on my part and stress on her. She didn't trust me enough to feel safe going out on the road alone. It's as simple as that.

    The only thing that fixed this was riding with other horses. One, ten, it didn't matter. The moment she had a friend, she felt the safety in numbers, and every time she hit that "too far from home" moment, she would hesitate, but with my encouragement and the support of having a small herd, she continued on. She is a horse that I can take anywhere now on the road. She is the calm older horse for others that were like her.

    Your mare will not get there with what you are doing.

    I understand the social anxiety. One thousand percent. I still battle it ten years later. But reaching out to others and pushing past that fear was the only way that my mare got past her insecurities. And since then we've done clinics, lessons, rides, camping, ect and our trust is way deeper but it didn't happen from solo road rides. You need to ride with other horses/people. Plain and simple.

    She's fresh from sitting, and settling in, and doesn't have trust in you yet. Not enough. It's not an insult or a slight against you, you two simply don't have that trust built yet.

    Continue to reach out and try to ride with others. I am telling you this is pretty much the only way she will get over this.

    Alternatively, I think NO riding out, and ONLY hand walks, should be done. Walk her out, just 5 minutes away, graze, walk home. Do it for longer periods and different routes but don't ride her. She doesn't have that confidence from you currently under saddle. So try to build it on the ground.

    Equinitis' suggestions also sound good, but I still think you should stop riding. Take the pressure off.
     
    ginster, Winchester and ~tiffy~ like this.
  5. foxtrot

    foxtrot Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2013
    Messages:
    2,693
    Likes Received:
    9,391
    Yes, exactly this.

    If, for example (and before anyone gets excited, this is a fake scenario) I post that I can't catch one of my horses, and all the replies say to round pen him, and I say I don't have a round pen... is that rude of me?
    Should I lie and say I'll round pen him when I don't have one?
    Or should I politely explain that I don't have a round pen and can't afford to build one at the moment, so is there anything else I can try?

    I agree it sounds like there's not much the OP can do til she can ride in company, but the mindset that it's a personal affront to posters if their suggestions can't be taken, so the poster should lie if they can't instantly obey all advice, is just nuts.
     
    NBChoice and NaeNae like this.
  6. GotaDunQH

    GotaDunQH Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2008
    Messages:
    17,845
    Likes Received:
    20,551
    I responded at the beginning of this post, but will respond again. This is supposed to be fun...right? We get into horses because it's fun, a true partnership is rewarding, it's therapy and so on. So I never could and still can't...understand why people stick with horses that simply aren't a good match, or have issues every time they ride, more horse than they can handle, aren't in the right situation to try and turn the situation around, and beat their head against the wall for answers to all their bad rides or problem horses. Life it too short and there are SO MANY good horses out there, that spending time with the WRONG horse takes precious time away from having the RIGHT horse. I just don't get it. Sell the horse and find something else....period. OR remain frustrated, stick with a horse that isn't suitable for the sake of ego, and figure it out yourself.
     
    kodemiester, Binca, NBChoice and 4 others like this.
  7. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Messages:
    38,426
    Likes Received:
    73,157
    Because, she probably has not put sufficient effort into riding with others. See the boldened above.

    Whe every suggestion, as I already explained, is shot down, the responder gets frustrated and starts to think that the person just can't really be bothered, UNLESS, it's some super easy fix.

    If you come to me, I give you a handful of suggestions and “no, can't do that“ is all youcan say, you just are not trying, IMHO.
     
    bobo and horses and NaeNae like this.
  8. Mcdreamer

    Mcdreamer Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2011
    Messages:
    1,736
    Likes Received:
    2,837
    Asking a horse to ride out alone far away from friends or their safety network is asking them for a whoooollleee lot of trust. It's the most unnatural thing for a horse to do. "Imma let this funny smelling bi-ped crawl up on to my back and then I'm going to walk away from my herd and my comfort zone for god knows how long for god knows why."

    If you want to keep this mare, going back to the basics and establishing a relationship with her is what will fix the problem. If you aren't the one feeding her every day, I would arrange my schedule so I could be the one feeding her. Spend time with her. Find her favorite itchy spot. Work on very basic ground manners together. Go for walks. Sounds ridiculous. But I didn't ride Henry for the first two years I knew him. All we ever did was just hang out and go for walks. He's the horse I can get on and go 12 miles down the road with a calm horse who is just fine being with me. It takes time but it's worth it!
     
    Winchester likes this.
  9. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Messages:
    38,426
    Likes Received:
    73,157
    When you buy a horse from a professional trainer, one bred and raised by pros, you have a horse that is far more likely to trust an unknown human than one that was NOT professionally trained.

    This is why I buy horses that were bred and have, at minimum, their two year old training installed by people looking to campaign their horses. You can get on, ride off, no issues with herd sourness or anything else. They 've been trailered, brought to shows, tied and learned patience, and do their job.

    Look for horses like this to buy. Even if it hasn't been ridden for years, they do not forget their training and will not have the issues that horses who are and have been only worked a few days a week have.

    This is why Stbs are so good: their job is learned by them being worked six days a week. Don't buy home trained, non-pro horses. They don't cost any more than badly trained horses cost.
     
  10. Mcdreamer

    Mcdreamer Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2011
    Messages:
    1,736
    Likes Received:
    2,837
    My guy, Oliver is that. Bred and trained by professionals. Show horse most his life. Hauled to shows everywhere. He can go out on trails alone no issue and has a solid training foundation. I also think this foundations instills within them a self of confidence so that no matter who is on their back or at the end of the lead rope, they have enough confidence to still do the job.

    Henry on the other hand was one of those god-awful gaited trail riding horse dealers. All they did was put a saddle on and ask him to go. He's a very unsure horse who has absolutely no confidence in himself. Being able to "restart" him these past few months have been a blast. He's your typical rocky in that he learns quickly and with a good attitude. The more he comes along the more I get to see that uncertainty shift into confidence.

    Having worked with rescue horses, it's why I always say that the best and most life-preserving thing you can do for a horse is train them well and kindly so that no matter who comes into that horse's life, they do their job.
     
    ginster and manesntails like this.

Share This Page