Horse that is very hot on the trails.

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by Corgiequestrian, Jan 4, 2019.

  1. Corgiequestrian

    Corgiequestrian Full Member

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    I have ridden plenty of horses that get a bit hot and jiggy when ridden out on the trail alone, but my new mare is a bit beyond what im used to and comfortable with. She is a 10 year old quarter horse. We can ride out to a certain point and then she decides she does not want to go anymore. She will plant the breaks, and then start backing up. I make her do circles both directions, this sometimes leads to rearing but we can get past this point. After that point she gets increasingly hot, eventually spinning around, walking sideways, backing up, trying to trot and jig, sometimes bucks. It feels like she is about to explode underneath me. I try to get her working and thinking about something else but by this point she will not circle or bend just tries to turn and bolt. I get off and lunge her both directions, but then sometimes i cannot get back on her because she is so worked up. She is wide eyed and scared of everything around her. I bought her 6 months ago, and she was sold to me as a solid trail horse. I longest i have been able to trail ride is maybe 45 minutes. Today we made it 10. Its winter now she isnt being ridden as often. Riding with others isnt an option for me i can only ride alone.
    i fell so hard for this horse, she is such a beautiful mover wonderful personality at home, i would really hate to sell her. What can i do to work through this ?
     
  2. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

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    She has your number and likely doesn't trust you to keep her safe out on the trail. I'd stay calm, tap her with a training crop when she doesn't listen to your leg. Don't get off and lunge and be scary, just calmly urge her forward. Back her up backwards down the trail if she doesn't want to go forward. Either way, she has to go the direction you are asking for. Reward every step.

    Work on bonding at home to solidify her trust in you.
     
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  3. Corgiequestrian

    Corgiequestrian Full Member

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    Im very calm with her, very light with my hands. The backing turns into rearing, and any kind of kick or tap turns into bucking so i just keep quietly urging her forward but usually have to circle to break her from standing still or backing. only get off when it gets to the point i dont feel safe staying on her, because i can feel she is about to explode. Its winter right now so i dont need her slipping at a full gallop and falling with me. The trails also cross over roads and she could run out in front of a car. What else can i do at home with her to make her trust me more?
     
  4. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

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    Do you ever work in hand? Ground work exercises? Obstacles in hand. Anything you can do in hand will help. Perhaps take an inhand trail walk with her.

    I'm not a big parelli person at all but their "Seven Games" helped my horse and I in a big way when it came to trust.
     
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  5. Corgiequestrian

    Corgiequestrian Full Member

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    I do lots of ground work getting her to back, teaching her to move her hips and shoulders, flexing, lunging, and did walk her down the trail on foot sometimes before the snow came. I also spend lots of time grooming her and scratching her. I dont have an arena or any way to set up obstacles atm but Ill check that out for the future though thanks.
     
  6. equinitis

    equinitis Senior Member

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    When you think she is starting to think about going back, turn her towards home and do lots of lateral work. Add in some backing, roll backs, etc. Work her pretty good, look for some hard breathing (not about to pass out breathing, just harder than a walk breathing). Then turn her away from home, walk her just a few steps, stop and let her get her breath back. As long as she stands quietly, let her stand until her breathing is normal.

    Continue on your ride until she indicates she would like to turn around again, turn her around and work her again. Do as much as you can with her facing home, just like before. Then turn her down the trail a few steps and let her rest again.
    Lather, rinse, repeat ideally getting further down the trail each time. Don't work her to death, the idea is to get a little farther each time and to let her know it is easier for her to do what you are asking than to resist.

    Your timing needs to be spot on. You need to turn her towards home and start working her BEFORE she gets totally resistant and starts dangerous behavior. Look for the elevated head, backed ears, slower gait/shorter strides then turn and work her before she tries to turn herself around.

    Don't make it a fight. If she becomes too difficult, go towards home until she will cooperate again. Go a little further then turn her back up the trail and start over.

    When you get her back to the barn, tie her and let her stand for a while. Don't just groom her and put her away. Some will say to work her hard right in front of the barn and that is OK too but just not making it pleasant to return to the barn is usually sufficient. Obviously, if you cannot get her far enough away form the barn to try what I suggested, you may need to work her hard near the barn then ride her away, face her away and let her rest.

    She is barn sour and if you do not get a handle on it, she may become quite dangerous.
     
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  7. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    How often does she get ridden?

    What does she get to eat(hay, grain, pasture, anything).
     
  8. Corgiequestrian

    Corgiequestrian Full Member

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    Shes a very easy keeper. Just grass hay and a small scoop of beet pulp so i can mix her vitamin supplement in it.

    At the most 3-4 days a week but sometimes may go a couple weeks without getting off the property due to the weather or trail conditions.
     
  9. Faster Horses

    Faster Horses Senior Member

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    Instead of working her up and making her move more, make her stop. She doesn't want to go forward? Fine, standing is cool too. Lots of standing and relaxing and boring....


    Soon she will decide that going forward is a much better option than just standing.

    It also bears repeating to check any tack as well. Does her saddle fit well? How about her bit? Is it a setup she is used to?

    If she was a solid trail horse not so long ago, and now isn't--the factor that made her change is you. What else is different from her former life to now?
     
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  10. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    She only goes so far because she feels unsafe. She doesn't know you well enough to trust you to keep her safe.

    Ride with others.
     
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