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Horse That Breaks Away on Lunge Line: HELP!

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by TurnNBurn321, Mar 22, 2013.

  1. MysticRealm

    MysticRealm Senior Member

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    Have you tried running the lunge line through the bit and back to the lunge surcingle (on the inside) so that if the horse goes to pull/run against the bit it pulls the horse's head to it's side? This would prevent the horse from bracing in order to break away.
    Like this (ignore the side rein, though using a longer side rein on the outside might be needed if horse just wants to turn tothe inside)
    [​IMG]
     
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  2. TurnNBurn321

    TurnNBurn321 Full Member

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    Actually, thats a good idea :rolleyes:
     
  3. TurnNBurn321

    TurnNBurn321 Full Member

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  4. TurnNBurn321

    TurnNBurn321 Full Member

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  5. MysticRealm

    MysticRealm Senior Member

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    Stepping on the lead, and having the head pulled to the side generally result in 2 different reactions. As long as you can flex her to the side by pulling on the rein, it really shouldn't be any different than the set up I described. It just doesn't allow the horse to brace which is what over powers the handler.
     
  6. TurnNBurn321

    TurnNBurn321 Full Member

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    Yes, and I understand that is generally the reaction. But Yacht is different, she reacts the same for both examples. When I ask her to flex, she does. But when she does it on her own, she freaks out.
     
  7. MysticRealm

    MysticRealm Senior Member

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    You would be the one flexing her to the side... you're the one holding the line. And if you do need to stop it cause she's ******** out all you do is let go of the line, she's used to running off while lunging anyways so it would be no different.
     
  8. coloredcowhorse

    coloredcowhorse Senior Member

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    Then you aren't using it correctly.....it is relatively easy to stop even a big horse with a chain on the nose or a lip chain IF you know how to use it....doesn't have to cause huge discomfort for them (some is fine....there IS a consequence for turning and bolting and it should be strong enough that the horse elects not to do it again).

    This horse has your number and if you are truly lunging her at only a walk you should have ample time to correct her......they don't just spin and bolt...they give notice that they are thinking about it...if you are not reading that then yes, you will be behind the action and have a more difficult time getting a correction done but not because the horse is that quick but because you aren't getting the cues she's giving that she is going to do this. You probably need someone to show you how to do this. So far you've gotten a number of suggestions all of which can and do work on this kind of problem if used correctly....and so far you have poopoo'd almost every single one. Unfortunately she's learning that she can ignore you and things will progress downhill as this continues. One or two good corrections will usually solve this issue but I doubt you are going to be able or are not willing to do what needs doing.
     
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  9. Feist

    Feist Senior Member

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    Sorry if this has already been clarified, I gave up reading after 5 pages xD

    So, first of all... Three different trainers at once. I'm just wondering, how well does that work out (unrelated to the lunging issue, just in general)? I'm honestly curious because while I totally understand that getting info from several sources gives you more options and knowledge, I'm worried that you would be pulled in different directions and wind up lost. Do they coordinate with each other at all? Have you considered working with one trainer primarily and just going to the others for advice if needed?

    Back to lunging. I am quite frankly appalled that a "trainer" would lunge a horse and wind up injured, then continue to make their STUDENT work with the horse in the exact way that got themselves hurt. Appalled. If THEY can't manage it, then they should NOT be expecting you to either. If none of your trainers or the owner are willing to work with you on a serious and dangerous problem, then they have no right to force you to work on it at all.

    I don't know enough about the situation to judge, but based on what you've said I'd be taking a good hard look at your setup and wondering if it's time to find a new trainer that will help you and keep you safe.
     
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  10. sublimequine

    sublimequine Senior Member

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    This horse has problems way beyond just lunging. You really need a professional to step in here, that is not overhorsed by these problems. Sounds like all of your current trainers don't have the skills to deal with this horse. Find a trainer that is skilled enough to address it.

    If you continue on as you are now, there's a huge chance you or the horse (or both) are going to get hurt. A horse running like it's tail is on fire dragging a very long lunge line is a recipe for disaster.
     
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