Horse DOESNT want to be outside

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by BipolarHonor, Nov 7, 2018.

  1. BipolarHonor

    BipolarHonor Senior Member

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    I've tried all sorts of combos. I've done the bug groups I've done alone I've done with just the one mare that he follows around the field. He doesnt like it so until I can get my own place and give him like slc said he is going back to the turnout while I'm at the barn. My older mare gets the same way to an extent she prefers outside but donesnt matter what you do when she decides it's time to come in then it's time to come in and she will walk a ditch into the ground pacing the fence waiting.
     
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  2. GotaDunQH

    GotaDunQH Senior Member

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    I really like giving the horse an option with an in/out...if it's possible. If I owned my own place, you betcha I would have stalls with a back door that opened up to a paddock.
     
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  3. GotaDunQH

    GotaDunQH Senior Member

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    In my over half a century of owning horses, I don't think I've ever seen an "odd man out" based on the math of whether and even number or odd number of horses were turned out together. The ONLY exception of "odd man out" was with an extremely alpha mare who NO ONE hung out with because she liked it that way and let ALL the other horses know. At the barn there were 3 hooligans turned out together in one of the big fields at the back of the race track. They all hung out together, but would also go off by themselves....no odd man out. It's not based on math....is based on personality and preferences.

    And yes, I've seen plenty of horses that simply do not care to spend a lot of time outside. At my previous trainer's barn, he'd turn horses out in the AM, and there would always be a couple of them that would start pacing the fenceline non-stop. Pretty easy to tell they didn't want to be out there and it had nothing to do with having a buddy.

    Today, I stopped by the barn and saw Sidney at about 2:30. Sure enough, I walk down the aisle and he's in his stall...back door open, and his lip is hanging to his knees because he's chillin' and nappin'.
     
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  4. tlwidener

    tlwidener Senior Member

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    Willow would prefer to be inside. She's a diva.

    I'm mean though. I make her go out. It's cheaper for her to be out. It's healthier for her feet and muscles.

    She doesn't pace though .She get pushy at the gate that goes into the pen with the attached stall. She'll also plant her feet and not want to leave the stall.

    I just don't care though. I can't afford to have princesses.
     
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  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    It's really nice, but there are issues. For example, it's really difficult to come up with a door arrangement that will withstand a horse being cast, never catch a foot under it, and to have footing around the doorway that doesn't get deep and muddy. If a horse is a little watchful he may be more nervous with the door open, especially while he eats. And it also lets in the weather. Here, the horses track in a lot of snow unless I want to snow-blow their paddocks.

    I also wanted to keep the horses from damaging the barn, so there is a fence to keep them away from the building. And a very short 'chute' from the door to the fence. I constantly worry about them getting a leg caught in the 'chute' part of the fence, but I maintain the doorway footing very carefully and they haven't gotten hurt on the 'chute.'

    I periodically put down limestone screenings in the doorways, after shoveling out any bedding that has been carried out into the doorway.

    I keep the doors shut for an hour after I give grain, too, as they could wind up tearing around in the paddocks right after having their grain otherwise.
     
  6. TBLove

    TBLove Full Member

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    My horse that just passed on, he preferred half day turnout. BUT Mornings only. Afternoons were a huge no go. He would stand at the gate or pace the fence line at the walk if you did afternoon turnout - he refused to do full day, or afternoons. Mornings ONLY, once it was 12:30-1:00 you bet he was at the gate wanting in. He also did not go out in rain as he hated it. He had no problems if he wasn't turned out at all either, perfectly content in his stall. He liked to be in his paddock Alone (he had a history of being beat up by others, so preferred no friends as other horses made him extremely nervous) , but he had horses in paddocks next to his field so he felt like a horsey. He was a champion hunter though, and his record and ability to come home champ every show let him live the life he wanted to! He had a pampered life, and got what he liked, its a shame he passed away so young though.

    My new guy, he goes out all day in a group and is a happy camper. He still is a baby though much easier to manage!!
     
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  7. foxtrot

    foxtrot Senior Member

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    Both of these posts resonate with me... I have 3. I had 2, and then one died unexpectedly, leaving me with an utterly frantic lone horse on my hands and no choice but to immediately find a friend no matter what. I never want to be in that situation again, so I bought a third, so that if (knock on wood) something ever befalls one I'm not left with a screaming lone horse again. But I don't want 4... so I guess that makes me a bad horse person.

    I've put a lot of thought into this from studying my own herd while wondering if I should get a 4th just to have pairs. Two of mine don't really like each other, the one always shoos the other away. However, the third horse hangs out with both equally. He grooms them both, moseys around with both, and both choose to stick close to him. So, it seems like nobody's suffering.

    Anyway, I'm sort of of the if it's not broke don't fix it mindset. Is there a reason your horse has to be outdoors more OP?
     
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  8. OldGreyMare

    OldGreyMare Senior Member

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    Doesn't make you a bad horse owner Foxtrot...makes you a wise horsewoman who KNOWS her horses, you don't lump them all into one big group because of what was once done and not learn and read a horse, each horse, for what they bring and who they are. Kudo's to you.

    Nice to see others who understand their horses and don't lump them into one group....no pun intended. :)
     
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  9. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    Yes, in so many things...find out what works for your horses and you.
     
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  10. BipolarHonor

    BipolarHonor Senior Member

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    aside from stocking up when kept inside (he messed up his back ankles at the track from traveling funny they kept rubbing and got sores (has to wear boots when worked) and now he swells and never made it to a race) and just plain wanting him out to move around and be a horse there is no huge reason for him to be outside for hours on end. i'm thinking he just got stuck in his daily routine at the track and is comfortable with it and just doesn't want to change. I was his groom at the track when he finally made his way to my boss's barn. he had a routine. stall done as soon as I got there, one of the first out to train, cooled out in the barn never went on the walker, back in his stall with his water and hay, groomed him as soon as I got the chance, morning grain around 1130 and then that was it he just slept and hung out until the assigned employee went back in between 4 and 5 for evening feeding. im thinking that's just what he is happy with and he doesn't take change very well.
     
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