Hind Leg Lameness

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Horselove4ever9, Dec 12, 2015.

  1. Horselove4ever9

    Horselove4ever9 Senior Member

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    I'm waiting to hear back from a friend, but I thought I would get on here and ask you HGS peeps what you think might be the problem. So backstory:

    Friend's horses were running around the paddock playing and having a good time. No one slipped or fell or stumbled, but after it was over she noticed one of her horses was lame on his right hind leg. She figured maybe he pulled something somehow and iced the leg. Later on in the evening she checked on him again and he was still lame but with absolutely zero swelling or heat anywhere in the leg.

    Fast forward to today (one day later) and everything is still the same. Lameness hasn't increased or decreased. Zero swelling, zero heat. No flinching when you poke and prod his hoof or leg. He'll pick it up and let you flex it back and forward to an extent, but it's hard to tell if the resistance is due to the injury or just his usual arthritis in the hock.

    She's called the vet out and is just waiting on that, so in the mean time I told her I would ask on here and see what anyone else thinks. I'm thinking the injury may be up in the hip like maybe he just took a wrong step and sprained it or something since there's no swelling and heat in the lower leg.
     
  2. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

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    It could be anything. Without a video to even tell where the lameness is coming from (low, high, hock, stifle, hip, etc) it's really hard for anyone to make any kind of educated guess.
     
  3. Horselove4ever9

    Horselove4ever9 Senior Member

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    Thanks R&B! I'll see if I can get her to send me a video. I didn't think to take one when I went down and saw her earlier.

    In the mean time the best I could describe it as is he really doesn't seem to want to stretch it too far forward and put very little weight on it. When he's resting and just standing too he doesn't keep that leg cocked, he kinda puts it under himself and rests the hoof flat on the ground, but with only slight weight put on it if that makes any sense. Backing and turning either way seem to exaggerate the lameness too. But I'll definitely try to get a video.
     
  4. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    Could be a hoof bruise, pincture...check sole and frog carefully. Hard to say by info given...Lots of options but usually things will start to swell if it's legs and lots of times you will see swelling w feet...usually.
     
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  5. VermilionStrife

    VermilionStrife Senior Member

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    Could be a hoof issue. My horse just blew three abscesses in a row in his hind left after never having an abscess before. Presented without swelling or heat, just slightly off. Within two days he had swelling up to his hock and very lame. Up until he was very lame on it, he was putting weight on his foot, but favoring it at the trot. He's now back to sound and almost healed up from abscess #3 after a month and a half. Lol

    Without a video though we can't really help you.
     
  6. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    If the horse is arthritic in the hock it could be he just over did and now the hock is hurting him. He doesn't have to have swelling in an arthritic joint for it to hurt. I'd have to see a video to see how he's walking to tell if he's stiff in the hock or not.

    It could also be an abscess going to pop soon. There are many cases of horses having deep abscesses that show no pain from a hoof tester and no swelling.
     
  7. Horselove4ever9

    Horselove4ever9 Senior Member

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    I figured I would update this now that the vet has been out and she updated me.
    Unfortunately it was not as simple as a arthritis flaring up or an abscess brewing.
    20 minutes before the vet came out he collapsed, the vet suspects that it was from muscle fatigue because he is non weight bearing on the hind leg and thus compensating and tiring himself out. He doesn't suspect there are any breaks/fractures in the lower leg or the hip. He doesn't think it's a muscle tear because it wouldn't be getting worse unless there was a blood clot that he kept ripping open every time he took a step which would have caused a hematoma(sp?) and there was no sign of that either.

    So it was left to two different options. He was very sore around the hunters bump on his back. It couldn't have been caused by riding since it's been months since he was last ridden. It is either a pinched nerve in his back that is shooting down his leg (characterized by the muscle spasms he was having in that leg) which would cause pain and could also cause him to be unable to completely feel that leg (or something along those lines). This is best case scenario.

    Worst case scenario he somehow fractured his back and that's what is causing everything. The vet told them straight up that that almost always ends badly.

    There was no way to do x-rays on the property because it's in a large area. So he is on bute to see if it helps with the pain and inflammatory of a pinched nerve. If it does we're looking at a good scenario. If it doesn't seem to help at all there aren't many options left. They could load him up and take him to get x-rays, but obviously loading and trailering a horse who is 3 legged lame and has a possible fracture in its back is a horrible idea. So the idea is to wait a couple days and see how he does on the bute and then go from there.

    The whole situation is absolutely devastating and prayers and jingles are welcome. The horse is an absolute sweetheart and one of those one in a lifetime type of horses. He doesn't have a mean bone in his body and she is so heartbroken. She was horrified to hear it could be fractured, especially since he never tripped, took a wrong step, fell, or even turned a corner too sharp to cause something like that. Based on that we are all hoping that he pinched a nerve.
     
  8. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

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    Something's not right. A "spaziming muscle" isn't something you can see jumping around as has been implicated above. Add to that any equine vet worth their salt would have a portable X-ray machine & be able to take X-rays on site. And Bute wouldn't be the only thing that good vet would prescribe.....there are way more options considering how truly sore you're saying this horse is.

    I would be looking for be second opinion given what's been described here......

    I wish your friend & the horse the best of luck. Fingers crossed.
     
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  9. kaitlynJ

    kaitlynJ Senior Member

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    Agree with R&B...even with it being a larger area, a portable xray machine can at least help determine just how serious things are. I am so sorry this happened :( but would bet your bottom if the horse is collapsing my vet would be xraying, ultrasounding etc to try to figure out an answer as quickly as possible. I hope your friend can find answers and a resolution quickly.
     
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  10. Horselove4ever9

    Horselove4ever9 Senior Member

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    A spasming muscle might not have been the best way to describe it and I truly wish I had been there to hear what the vet had said in person because I'm sure there are things getting lost in translation and pieces missing too. But I do know that the vet she used has some of the highest praises for vets in our area. There are only a select few horse vets and one retired and the other one you're lucky if you can get her out without her canceling but still charging you. He has a portable x-ray but because the area needing xrays was his back and/or hip he said his was too small to work for that type of thing. I'm assuming the same was probably true for an ultrasound too. Bute wasn't the only option. They had the other option of a different pain killer one that would have been stronger and worked better (can't for the life of me remember the name thought) but with using that pain killer there was also a higher risk of founder. And since the horse is so massive and putting more weight on his front legs the vet didn't want to run the risk of having him founder in addition to everything else.
     

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