Help with trainer problems

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by sarah_eq_1990, Feb 22, 2018.

  1. sarah_eq_1990

    sarah_eq_1990 Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2018
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    22
    Hi everyone, I ride hunter/jumper and have been at the same barn for the past two years. Before that I lived in a different state but rode inconsistently for about 10 years. I have a solid w/t/c foundation and currently jump smaller jumps and short courses as well as ride some green horses for experience. I can ride through a buck or spook or a horse that needs some work. I'm nothing fancy nor an expert but I also wouldn't say total beginner. I recently decided it is time for me to get my own horse, as I patiently waited till I was through college and the worst two years of graduate school and can now financially afford the monthly upkeep!. When I told me trainer she was initially very excited. Until she asked my budget. I want to stay at or under $4000. I do not need or want a fancy horse. Something that can take me to schooling shows and possibly local open shows and have fun with and that is it! Let's face it, graduate students and full time scientists don't have time for crazy showing schedule and I accept that! However, my trainer does not think that my budget will get me anything suitable and now says I am not ready for a horse. Is my budget that bad for a first horse? I don't need a polished warmblood or Irish sport horse..... I did recently find out that another lady at the barn who just got her first horse (much more in-experienced then me because she just recently started riding) paid 9000 for a TBxdraft cross from a field. She is a super sweet mare, but does not have a lot of miles. Doesn't have a good work ethic, can't bend yet or collect at all, cannot pick up the correct lead or canter yet. Basically just needs some work. That BLEW my mind. I have rode this horse many times and I would have NEVER paid that much. I guess my issue is, do you guys think I could find a decent horse for me, and do you think they are now mad that I cant afford a fancy show horse to make their barn look good? That is what someone else suggested. Am I being totally unreasonable with my budget? Any opinions and suggestions welcome. THanks for reading my rant!
     
    mkoktavy likes this.
  2. Rachel1786

    Rachel1786 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2012
    Messages:
    1,934
    Likes Received:
    760
    I think 4k is a pretty decent budget, but then again, I've never paid more then $800 for any of my horses. It may take some time to find something suitable, but if you aren't looking for a finished show horse, I don't think its unreasonable at all. I don't know anything about hunter/jumpers, so maybe I'm wrong tho lol.

    There is also location to consider, what can be bought for 4k in my area, may go for double or triple in another area.
    Your best bet is going to be to search the horse classifieds (dreamhorse.com for example) and get an idea of what's out there in your area.
     
    ibsammy likes this.
  3. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2014
    Messages:
    7,055
    Likes Received:
    21,510
    A lot depends on your location but I think $4000 is very reasonable for what you're looking for. I think it's a pity that rather than work with you within your budget, your trainer has basically shut you out. I would be looking for a new trainer honestly.
     
  4. StraightandTrue

    StraightandTrue Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2010
    Messages:
    983
    Likes Received:
    656
    Did you explain to your trainer what kind of horse you're looking for? I don't think $4000 is terrible if all you want is to get out there but not necessarily be competitive. Having said that, are you 100% sure that buying a horse is the best option? There are some lovely horses out there whose owners don't have time to ride them because of other commitments. You may be able to lease or part lease a really quality horse so you don't have to worry about the purchase price. With a part lease it also reduces your overhead expenses, which frees up money for lessons and competition fees. I only suggest this because if you're not after a fancy horse and you only want to do local shows, then I'm sure there are quality lease horses out there who tick those boxes.

    If you do have your heart set on buying a horse, I would only caution that cheaper to buy doesn't always equal cheaper to maintain. A thorough vet check is a must, and if possible trial the horse beforehand to make sure it's right for you. There are some hidden gems out there if you're patient enough to wait. Word of mouth and shameless internet stalking are the best ways to snag a bargain before it hits the open market. Volunteer at the local comps, make note of the riders whose horses you liked, then add them on FB. Find out what the horse's breeding is then see if you can find any relatives for sale, or track down the breeder and see if they have any relatives. Add the breeder on FB too. Join some local FB groups that advertise horses for lease or sale. If you see a horse you like, go through the owner's FB photos to see if they match what the owner is claiming. The number of times I've seen people advertise "quiet" horses, and then found photos of said horse rearing / bucking on their FB page... it makes you never want to trust anyone again! People often forget what they put on social media, so if you do your homework you can avoid wasting your time on something that isn't suitable.

    Best of luck!
     
  5. sarah_eq_1990

    sarah_eq_1990 Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2018
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    22
    Thank you! Leasing is definitely an option too, I am actually talking to someone about a lease-to-own situation that might work out for me. I understand that a cheaper horse doesn't mean cheaper board or vet...etc...I just don't think I need a 10k horse. SO MANY people I know have never even spent more than 2000k on a horse and end up with decent show horses. I have been stalking dream horse for about two months and there seem to be plenty of decent horses but my trainer doesn't even want me to suggest horses and wants to do it all herself. I sent her one link to a good sounding and horse and she ignored my e-mail. I think it is time for a new trainer! Thank you for all the tips on finding a good horse on a budget!
     
  6. Preppy_Ponies

    Preppy_Ponies Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2007
    Messages:
    4,365
    Likes Received:
    885
    It really depends on where you are. In my area your budget would get you something that has questionable soundness, limited/no training or some other issues. I would bring up to your trainer that you might be interested in leasing as well. She might have something in the barn or know of a good fit that is looking for a lease situation.
     
  7. slc

    slc Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    22,650
    Likes Received:
    13,630
    Yes, for what you want, $4000 is not very much. I've been looking recently. Horses are very expensive. $4000 doesn't buy much these days. Yes, Thoroughbred draft crosses are much more expensive than they used to be.

    It depends a little on where you are. There are parts of the US and Canada where you can get a fairly decent young green hunter prospect for $4k or perhaps even a little less, but it's going to be rough - a lot more like your friend's horse with 'no work ethic' and 'no collection' and 'doesn't turn.' Muddy and in a field. Very little training, maybe a jerk to handle, bad for the farrier, something, and hopefully not anything that's dangerous. And you're going to put a lot of work into the horse.

    And yes, some barns or trainers always put a lot of pressure on students to buy expensive horses.

    Sometimes that's the level the trainer really is at, and sometimes it's the level the trainer would like to be at, LOL.

    But I would not assume that the trainer is really mad or done with you, they have a way of staying in your life, LOL. Many trainers will push and bully, and if you just stubbornly persist in what you want to do they will try and get money out of you some other way, for example, get you to ride a sale horse so the trainer doesn't have to, things like that.

    Dealing with a trainer, sorry to say, is quite often kind of a power game where they figure out ways to make money off you and you reluctantly go along with it, LOL, so you don't wind up without a trainer(or they make you think you will if you don't play along). They push, you don't want to do what they're pushing you to do, they try something else. As long as you're making them some money, you're ok.

    Say you buy a $4000 horse and then you sell him for $15,000 a year or year and a half later. Then you may only make her $400-600 right now, but when you sell the horse(she'll be pushing you to sell the horse for more within a year....), she'll get $2000 commission. You haven't talked commission? Doesn't mean a thing. She'll get a commission from the seller of the $4000 horse and from the buyer of the $15,000 horse, and a commission from the seller of the next more expensive horse you buy, say 15% on a $10,000 horse, that's $1500. So she makes a total of almost $5000 off you. That might keep her happy. Especially if she thinks there's a $25,000 horse in the pipe after the $10,000 horse. And that people seeing your horses will direct some customers toward her barn.

    It's a game, kiddo, you may as well learn that now. Most trainers make money by hustling all the time, and they aren't working on behalf of anyone but themselves.

    Put up with what you can tolerate and try to keep your goals and your budget in mind. Many people take lessons from the trainer but do exactly what they want and all the pressure goes in one ear and out the other. If they get pushed out of the barn they just shrug and leave and go work with someone else.

    A lot of people go to haul-in lessons from time to time precisely to get away from all the pushing and pressure. If you're in the trainer's barn and they run the barn and the lesson program and you're boarding there, you have more of a relationship, you're going to get pushed to do things that are more in the trainer's interest than yours, with 99.999% of trainers.

     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2018
  8. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    13,052
    Likes Received:
    9,382
    Good for you. Yes, I'd personally look at lease options and keep socking money away. I think four thousand is a reasonable starting point, especially if you aren't looking for a competitive show horse.

    I'd consider another trainer myself. I don't like the attitude. Maybe she'd just got her hopes up on making a good commission off you. Don't buy from a trainer BTW. Not unless you've deep pockets and have plenty to spend on upkeep. You can get a decent deal, but usually they're more interested in turning a horse and making money off you. Never, ever consider your relationship special and that she's looking out for your best interest. It doesn't work that way 99.9% of the time. Buyer beware.
     
  9. ~tiffy~

    ~tiffy~ Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,002
    Likes Received:
    840
    Look on some ottb sites. 4K will get you a very nice prospect. Just don’t forget the PPE!
     
  10. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Messages:
    5,382
    Likes Received:
    2,261
    4K would get you a pretty good mount or at least one with a lot of potential in my area. It all depends on the area. A horse is worth what someone will pay for it. Look in areas that H/J isn't as popular as something else. Like the south. we're all about our cow horses. English horses are less expensive here than other places, generally speaking..
     

Share This Page