Help with my new filly!

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by Pepper&Justan, Dec 30, 2018.

  1. Pepper&Justan

    Pepper&Justan Registered

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    :help:Hello, I just rescued a new regitered paint filly that is super skittish. I will be cleaning stalls and she stays as far away as she can. I stuck my fork out to get shavings semi close to her leg and she kicked at the rake. Any tips, I don't want her hurting anyone or herself. She almost doesn't seem happy which breaks my heart. I turned on music to see if that would calm her and it helps but she still wont come close. Thanks!:bow:
     
  2. Mcdreamer

    Mcdreamer Senior Member

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    How long ago is "just?" Your horse will need some time to adjust to a new place. Especially if she has a troubled past. Do you have someone who has experience with young horses to help you out?
     
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  3. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

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    Mcdreamer is right, how long have you had her? When you say Filly, how old?

    Sounds like you are inexperienced and probably way over your head with a skittish / wild filly.
     
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  4. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Put her in a small corral then go watch some videos on how to catch horses.

    Right now, being in a stall, she has NO WAY to get far enough away to feel safe. A horse needs to move away until it learns you are not dangerous. In the stall you are asking to get her hurt and keep her fearful.
     
  5. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    1) How much turn out is she getting? Young horses need LOTS of turnout.
    2) How long have you had her? If you just got her and she's skittish, you probably should take her out of the stall before you start swinging pitch forks around and making a bunch of noise in her "house"
    3) That is not skittish, that is being defensive and protecting herself, a herd animal instinct. You can't train out a herd instinct, you can teach her when it is appropriate to protect herself and when it is not necessary.

    You need a trainer that knows how to read horses. She only speaks "horse", you need to speak her language in order to train her.
     
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  6. NBChoice

    NBChoice Senior Member

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    Your account says you are 13 years old. Do you have someone knowledgeable and older to help you with this filly?
     
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  7. Pepper&Justan

    Pepper&Justan Registered

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    @NBChoice yes, I have several instructors down the road and not to far away.:)
    @palogal & @manesntails I will put her in a bigger corral tomorrow and see if that helps, Thank you soooo much!:bow:
     
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  8. Pony123

    Pony123 Full Member

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    One of the things my mom did after we got our 5mo old colt who was pretty much unhandled and his only experience with people was to the vet and being trailered, was let him out into a big round pen and just sit and ignore him. My brother and I would read in there for hours, or walk slowly around the pen, but we wouldn't look at him or approach him. It took a while, but eventually he got curious and came up to us. I remember being ten, and being the first one he came to and pressed his nose into my hand, cool feeling! Anyway, we did that ALOT. Once he was used to us being around, we would feed him. Every time he got grain, he would eat through his halter, in the grain bucket. When we got it on him we would leave it on for a while and then take it off and make a big deal about it, so he would have good experiences with it. I recommend working closely with a trainer. A lot can happen with a young unhandled rescue and it could be dangerous. Make sure you have someone else at the barn with you in case you need help or something happens. Be smart and don't be afraid to ask for help.
     
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  9. Pepper&Justan

    Pepper&Justan Registered

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  10. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    When you do get her coming to you DO NOT halter her. First you have to get her used to being touched, shoulder at the wither, then rubbed all over, over time, with a rope halter.

    This takes a while, you go step by step. First the wither, then shoulder, rub a little and the INSTANT she shows signs of wanting to move off, alerting to the new area you are touching, BEFORE she moves, go quickly back to where she accepts it.

    Don't look right at her face with two eyes, EVER, that's an instinctual message that you are stalking her. Use your peripheral vision.

    Later, you rub the face with the rope halter, pull it up just on the nose, take it right off. On and off, on and off. Your objective is to get her comfortable with something touching her body and later her face “one section of her body, then head at a time.“

    This makes it much easier for her to accept, and NEVER fight and pull back when she feels pressure on her head.
     
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