Head bobbing??

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by bowfarm, Apr 17, 2006.

  1. bowfarm

    bowfarm Full Member

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    I've been reading some of the posts and notice that someone writes about head bobbing. It appears this is done when the horse is lame. Could someone explain why this occurs??

    Also does it only occur when under saddle or when the horse is just walking around the pasture??

    I've noticed a natural head bob when horses walk, is this part of head bobbing?

    I'm afraid I don't know to what extreme these posters are talking about for it to be considered head bobbing due to lameness issues. Is there a particular degree of bobbing that is cosidered a lame head bob?

    What do you call it when the horses head bobs slightly while in normal walking?

    Thanks, just trying to get educated and had these question after reading some posts.
     






  2. MissBandit

    MissBandit Senior Member+

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    Horses naturally bob their heads while they are walking. A pronounced bob in the walk, and if seen in the trot, indicates pain in the leg/hoof which is causing the head bob. (Familiar with Bob now? lol)
     
  3. BornToRide

    BornToRide Senior Member+

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    one my horses does it when he is bored lol
     
  4. MissBandit

    MissBandit Senior Member+

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    Have you ever seen a lame horse move? It depends on the level of pain, degree of injury, WHERE the injury is located as well as that individual horse's pain tolerance. It will be more pronounced than their normal gait.

    If the injury is in the forefront, the head will bob down when the injured foot is striking the ground. If the injury is in the rear, the head will bob up when the injured hoof strikes the ground.
     
  5. bowfarm

    bowfarm Full Member

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    :) Thank you MissBandit that pretty well explains it. I have never seen lame horse move. My family has been pretty lucky to not have any lameness issues. So it appears the head will bob sharply up or down. good info on the forefront and rear lameness coinciding with the up and down bob. I guess it would be akin to humans walking barefoot on gravel. Our shoulders get all scrunched up while we hot foot it. :eek: LOL
    Thanks again. :)
     
  6. rageandglory

    rageandglory Senior Member+

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    Agree with MissBandit....when a horse is not lame, he should walk with a rhythmic up/down swing (bob) of his head, evenly, and at every stride. simply put: a lame horse, if the issue is in front, will drop his head quickly and low, proportionate to the degree of pain and only when he steps on sore leg/foot. hind soreness, horse will pick up his head on weight bearing with the sore leg/hoof.

    there are several other lameness ways of going but these are most broadly seen, with the widest range of injury possibilities. certain conditions, such as laminitis, and navicular, have their own signs and symptoms that stand them out to a familiar eye from the general. for instance: a foundering horse is likely sore up front, and VERY unwilling to pick his feet up, and will appear to be quite stiff, and most reluctant to move at all, release of pressure being incredibly painful. the navicular horse does not want to put his foot down, and tends to walk "over his toes ", trying to find a painfree support point. these difficulties/conditions are frequently found in both front feet at the same time tho not exclusive from the hind. each horse, of course, will present his own signs and effects, so these are general guidelines.
     
  7. osage

    osage Senior Member+

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    glad you posted this bowfarm as I was sort of wondering the same thing...lol
     






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