Having doubts. . .

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by Dona Worry, Dec 2, 2017.

  1. WildLittleWren

    WildLittleWren Full Member

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    You sound like you have a good head on your shoulders and I wish more horse people thought like you did, to be the best owner they can be and to keep their horses happy and healthy, for better or worse
     
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  2. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    I'd not worry about it and just have a relaxed agenda with her. You can always bring her home if she's having problems.
     
    ginster likes this.
  3. StraightandTrue

    StraightandTrue Senior Member

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    I don't understand why some people are getting so worked up. In an ideal world, sure, the OP would have a beginner safe horse to learn on instead of a greenie. But from what I've read she has a lot of support around her, intends to ride the horse under supervision, and continue taking lessons to further improve her riding. By my account she is making very sensible decisions for her and the horse.

    Some of you really need to calm down and stop tearing shreds off the OP. I don't believe that being a beginner limits you to dawdling around on a semi-retired schoolmaster, especially if you're an adult with the right support around you. In any case, she will need regular lessons regardless of her horse's level of training in order to improve her riding. Provided the horse is straightforward enough to ride and the OP is committed to having regular lessons, the trainer should be able to keep her and the horse on track.

    Regarding bringing an older horse back into work, it really depends on the horse. Some horses are done by 15yrs old, others are happy being ridden into their late twenties. If anything, the fact that the mare hasn't been worked into the ground will be in your favour as she will have less wear-and-tear on her joints and tendons. You never know unless you try. If the horse doesn't cope, well, you've thrown away a bit of money. But if she does cope then you've scored yourself another riding horse. I would only suggest keeping close tabs on the mare and being actively involved in the process so you can pull the pin if things start to go south.
     
  4. equineeventer33

    equineeventer33 Senior Member

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    You never know what the trainer may bring out of her, she may end up being a wonderful riding horse and remembering her old training (if she had any). Two years ago we rescued this 18 hand skin and bones thoroughbred. My sister (a vet) thinks he's in his mid-late teens. He spent most of the first year just gaining weight, being a horse, learning to trust me on the ground. The only thing we were told about him was that he was a "show horse". After he got to a good weight, I started trying to ride him. I say try because he would refuse to move when I got on. He would rubber neck, he would just stand and completely ignore me, if I did get him moving he would crow hop or try to take me back to the barn, completely ignored my legs and reins, etc. He would refuse to move when being led on the ground. He seemed like a completely rank, untrained horse. But I kept trying, because he was so sweet and I had fallen in love with him on the ground. One day I rode him while my sister was riding her horse. He started following her horse around the ring and I realized, once he got moving, he had a very nice trot. Then I took him on a trail, and he just seemed so happy. It only took a handful more rides for him to realize being ridden isn't so bad. I started finding out that he knew leg yields, he had a wonderful extended trot, he had a flawless flying lead change, and he knew how to jump. He was, at some point in his life, a very nice horse. Someone just made him extremely sour and he learned to hate being ridden. Now, I'd trust him with a beginner in a heart beat. He is a completely different horse. It just took a little trust and a few positive experience rides for him to remember his past.
     
  5. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

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    Don't take it to heart @Dona Worry. You seem to have some common sense and have a good plan. Don't mind the "internet trainers." They talk just to hear themselves and most of them probably don't even have a horse, or if they do, they can't do half of what they preach.

    Take me for example: I am experienced, I've trained a good number of colts and horses, I've worked for high end professional trainers. I am not an idiot, I am educated and I am a good rider, but the internet trainers still find lots to hang me for, too. It doesn't bother me b/c at the end of the day I have a nice horse that I created.

    Good luck! :)
     
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  6. wpgrider

    wpgrider Senior Member

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    I don't get it - as long as the trainer is aware of her history, not going to push her considering her age, and you've been clear you don't NEED or expect the same results as you would sending a young one out for training - the worst thing that happens is Dona wastes her money.
     
  7. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    Yes, and while I have high HOPES I don't have high EXPECTATIONS.
    I hope she'll love it, settle down and be my kid horse when I have kids.
    But I am not expecting that, and certainly not without a lot of work and dedication on my part. I have been a farmer long enough to know that miracles generally only happen after lots of hard work and sore muscles, if at all.
     
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  8. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    SHE GOES JAN 1st.

    I'M NOT MENTALLY READY but I'll get there.
    It's a nice place, and she is THE BEST horse. They'll love her, and spoil her, and she'll be fine.
     
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  9. WildLittleWren

    WildLittleWren Full Member

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    You will be just fine! Do keep us updated and I will cross my fingers that she is all you hope she will be
     
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