Having doubts. . .

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by Dona Worry, Dec 2, 2017.

  1. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    1,920
    Likes Received:
    3,325
    I think you may be reflercting your own fears, challenges, and negativity onto another person..... A positive can do attitidue can overcome a lack of natural talent.....and for all we know Donna is full of untapped natural talent. Donna has manged to so far raise Quest, teach him to lead, trailer, blanket, get him gelded, and fed without growth issues.... I think as long as she wants to make forward progess and puts efforts into that goal than she will. She is ot trying to do thi on her own she is getting the help of a trainer.

    My trainers barn is full of horses owned by adult women that did not have a chance to ride as young people, many of them are now empty nesters that can finally aford and have time to ride. They generaly have their young dream horse in training that they come out and take a lesson on once or twice a week and go to shows and they really enjoy it...and the horses are doing just fine.
     
    CheyAut, Larkspade, mkoktavy and 3 others like this.
  2. slc

    slc Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    20,545
    Likes Received:
    12,400
    You don't really know that.

    I don't think anyone does. Because if Dona were not endowed with 'natural talent' that would suggest that other people are and...that's nuts.

    I don't think 'natural talent' ever enters into the riding equation. It's a fantasy. Riding simply isn't a 'natural activity'. Primitive man rode horses for thousands of years? No, in fact he did not. He chased them, he ate them, he had them pull things, but he did not ride them until historically recently. Humans have no 'riding instincts' or 'riding talent'. They're not made for riding in any way (if they were, women would have detatchable bosoms and men would have their....uh...somewhere else than right in firing range of the horse's withers).

    It's entirely taught(either self taught or instructor taught or both, but it's taught), and entirely unnatural.

    Every time I hear someone declared to have a 'natural talent' for riding, I see someone who is slung on the horse like a sack of potatoes and the only thing he or she has going for him or herself is being too dimwitted to be afraid, LOL.

    That IS an asset, however, and the person who isn't terrified DOES learn faster. It also helps to have what I've often called, 'Zen Mind, Stupid Mind.' Meaning that the fewer things you think about at a time, and the more you pay attention to what you're doing, the faster you learn riding.

    But in my experience, any time one lovingly informs someone that person has 'natural talent', having the person THINK that is the quickest road to 'natural disaster' there is.

    In fact, my suggestion is that if you really despise someone, tell her she has 'natural talent.' It's just as guaranteed to ruin someone as giving them money for nothing.

    Years ago a cyclist told me that the most sure way to make someone crash their racing bicycle on a corner was to saunter up to them, smile and say, 'I love how you ride corners.' And this is utterly true for riding as well. The less one thinks and the better one follows orders, the faster one learns.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2017
    Binca likes this.
  3. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2016
    Messages:
    5,645
    Likes Received:
    11,043
    Nope, only REAL HORSEMEN can ride.
     
  4. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2012
    Messages:
    4,435
    Likes Received:
    7,977

    As with the horses, ground handling does not necessarily translate to riding. It's a totally different type of skill. If somebody doesn't have a lot of body coordination when the teenage days are over, what the person can achieve as a rider is limited.

    People starting to ride as adults are mostly limited by what they have or have not done in terms of sports and other physical activities as kids. The most amazing case I have seen was an ex ballet dancer who started to ride when in her late 20ies and her professional dancing career was over. She had amazing coordination and took to it like a bird to flying. She could simply physically do what the instructor told her to do because she had that previous athletic and coordinative training. (just stopping sticking her toes out was a problem for her)

    Then there are the adults who are somewhere in the middle and turn into good riders with a lot of practice, and then there are those who have a ton of fun on a beginner friendly horse that doesn't challenge them, but never really get the body coordination to be reasonably good at it, no matter how much they practice.
     
  5. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2012
    Messages:
    4,435
    Likes Received:
    7,977

    Nope, there are plenty of a---holes in the sport who are technically good to excellent riders but exploit horses as a piece of sports equipment. Definitely the opposite of real horsemen.
     
  6. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2009
    Messages:
    17,279
    Likes Received:
    43,441
    Well then, I’m screwed, too, because I got on my rusty training-like-swiss-cheese bucks-at-the-canter mare as a green as grass beginner and off we went.

    Now seven years later, she’s fancy broke and incredible to ride. (Well, naughty right now from having the summer off, but the training is still there) We could have gotten there faster by other means. I could have just taken lessons instead of buying a horse. I could have waited for a perfect schoolmaster (and been bored out of my mind. Not a schoolmaster kind of person. I like a challenge) But I did not. And what do you know. It worked out.

    Do I recommend it? No. But I bloody well did it, and it turned out fine. I wouldn’t change a thing.

    You at least take lessons and have a trainer so you could very well pass me up in time if you keep at it.

    So, anyway, my point is that you’re in good company at least. :rofl:
     
    Larkspade, ginster, Sam C. and 2 others like this.
  7. AmyK

    AmyK Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,263
    Likes Received:
    1,291
    I skimmed this. I see it from both sides, regarding Calypso at least.

    I'm one of those people who had a year or so of weekly lessons and bought a green horse. Guess how it went. I had to sink thousands of dollars of training into a mare I could probably sell for a thousand bucks or less. Made a much better rider out of me, but it was a matter of stubbornness and determination, and just dumb, dumb luck that I wasn't seriously hurt on one of the many occasions I was bucked off.

    My mare was also 5 when I bought her, so at ages 6 and 7 when she was having her many, many come-to-Jesus moments with the trainer, and later, when I learned, with me, it wasn't all that unfair to her, other than the fact that I had basically taught her to ball, refuse, and buck people off. But physically, at least, it wasn't overly taxing.

    She's 15 now, and much, much better behaved, but she's not a beginner horse. Never will be, and will never be sold. She is just too unpredictable and he spin-bolt-buck combo is just too likely to hurt someone.

    If you send Calypso off, and thts what she is at 17... forget it. If you send her off, and she remembers some earlier training... well, that's awesome, but you have to be prepared that Calypso's "good" might be like my Licorice's "good," which is that a strong rider (or in my case, just a rider that knows her tricks) can handle her but she might be dangerous for you to ride. Or maybe not. I don't think there's any harm in trying and having her evaluated to see.

    Just be sure to keep in mind too the trainer needs to bring her back slowly... I have a 17 year old that I show and has never been lame and I make sure to keep in work... an older horse that stays in work is different than an older horse that has been out of work. I just started mine on a preventative joint supplement... 17 is the age where I start to think "getting older."

    The question wasn't about the colt. Keep taking lessons and cross that bridge later. He doesn't have baggage.
     
    ginster, Sam C., Dona Worry and 2 others like this.
  8. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Messages:
    33,987
    Likes Received:
    65,903
    @slc, she said it HERSELF in post #14 in this very thread. She doesn't want to ride enough to buy a beginner horse to ride. So, I know she has little riding ambition and her other threads, after over 100 lessons, she can't balance at the trot and she is scared. She admits it herself.

    Natural talent doesn't mean you are A~mazing with horses. It means you have an ability to keep yourself in balance and instinctively do in your body what you want the horse to do. Nothing to do with going to the Olympics.
     
  9. Bakkir

    Bakkir Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Messages:
    3,964
    Likes Received:
    4,868
    I have no doubt Dona can learn to ride well. It just takes time and practice.

    I too started with weekly lessons. I had a year of good schooling before I bought my first mare. In that time I went from a beginner to Champ (H/J) at the local show. Dolly was a saint with me, despite a trainer that almost ruined her. I rode her for 3 years with a few months of extra lessons inbetween. No problems. Never had a scary moment with her. She was a 5yr old unbroke broodmare.

    Normally green on green equals black and blue. But not always.

    I hope that Quest will turn out to be good for Dona. It is possible to learn together.

    Calypso is a different story. She may never be a safe horse to ride. At this point she has been taught to resist and allowed to get away with it. Hopefully consistent handling and work with help her be a happier safer animal.
     
    Dona Worry likes this.
  10. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Messages:
    9,559
    Likes Received:
    13,987
    Found the quote I was looking for. 24176794_10215077694604574_4496429333066777482_n.jpg
     
    CheyAut, DelP, mkoktavy and 5 others like this.

Share This Page