Having doubts. . .

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by Dona Worry, Dec 2, 2017.

  1. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    So I am on the waiting list to send Calypso to the trainer, she is getting her coggins etc this month, things are moving onwards and upwards!

    And I am no longer sure I am doing the right thing.

    She's 17. Has had a rough life. Maybe it IS better to just let her be a pasture puff and then if something happens to me, shoot and bury her on the farm. Maybe that is the fair and kind thing to do. Sending her away will stress her out. Relearning how to be a riding horse will stress her out. Hasn't she earned a quiet, stress-free life? Hasn't she earned a retirement?

    On the other hand. . .'
    She has so, so much to give. So much patience, so much kindness. She loves kids, has never ever taken advantage of my inexperience, or gotten frustrated with me. She is just a Good Horse, all the way around. She would make the perfect horse to pack my (eventual) kids around, and I know she would treat them well. She loves life, loves to be spoiled. I can't bear the thought of her being is a position where if something happened her ONLY option was to be pts as a healthy, vibrant horse.
    So while I still feel that getting her going under saddle IS in her best interest, it just doesn't FEEL like it is her best interests, and I am struggling with that. Above all, I want her to be happy. This will stress her out.
    *sigh*
    Any words of wisdom? Am I actually doing the right thing, or am I being selfish?
     
  2. cschattner

    cschattner Senior Member

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    Sending a horse off to training is never easy. You can only do what you feel is right and hope for the best outcome.

    If your ok with letting a horse be a pasture puff then go for it.
    Personally 17 is a little up there for a complete all around breaking to ride. If it's just a refresher then I would say go for it. With a refresher as long as a good foundation was laid it should be a simple deal. Get her used to a person again, using those muscles and tada.

    Complete training would be too much for me, especially on a horse so close to 20. It's your decision to go for it or not.
     
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  3. Rachel1786

    Rachel1786 Senior Member

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    I would see how she handles the whole process. Is there any chance she was a riding horse sometime in her life? She came from auction correct? So maybe this will be more of a refresher for her and she will love going back into work, or if its a totally new thing for her, maybe she will love having a job and learning. If she is miserable during the training you can always bring her back home and declare her as a permanent pasted pet, at least then you can say you tried. My OTTB is 20 and while she has always been a riding horse, she developed some severe behavioral problems when I did a free lease of sorts(basically let this woman ride her because I didn't have the time and she caused all sorts of issues) so in spring, I'm planning on sending her to a trainer for a month in hopes of finally being able to enjoy riding my horse again. As long as they are physically able to, I don't think they are ever too old to learn, my gelding was guessed to be 28 when I got him when I was 12 and I rode him all the time until I got pregnant at 21(so he was about 37) now he's about 48 and still bossing around his younger much bigger pasture mates lol
     
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  4. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    Nothing says that you have to keep her in training no matter what. If her mind truly is so blown that she can’t be a riding hors, you can always bring her back home.

    Whether she ends up being a riding horse or not, it is in her best interest to spend some time in a more normal, healthy environment with more experienced person to see what is or isn’t there.

    She’s your baby and sending her off is understandably stressful, but it will be good for both of you in the long run. She may be stressed about it at first, but even if she is, it will be good for both of you long term.

    This way, you’ll know how far gone her mind is or isn’t. Most likely, she can adjust and be a normal happy horse. But on the chance that she cannot, you know 100% either way if you send her off to see what’s what.
     
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  5. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    I agree with @Arem.
    You can always take her home if it is too much for her.
    But it will be good for both of you to spend some time apart. Plus-she will meet other horses there and you will be able to see if she really prefers to be overall alone or if she just hasn't found the right buddy yet.
    My vote is to at least try it.
     
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  6. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    I am 100% sure she was ridden before-- there is scarring on her tongue right where a bit would go, and she certainly knows what a saddle is for. I am not convinced that experience is in my favor. . . I have put the trainer that was coming around in hold because things were starting to disintegrate. He was getting frustrated with her, and trying hard to disguise it from everyone, including himself. She simply was not reacting in ways he was prepared for, and I think he found that alarming. She is a lot better with me, but I absolutely 100% DO NOT WANT a horse that only I can do things with-- it is the total opposite of what I am trying to achieve here.
    I really really like my lesson barn, and I think if I could keep her from stressing she would LOVE it there... big pasture with only mares! People who believe in rubbing the itchy spots and giving mints as a reward for a job well done! Sweet little girls who love to giggle and give extra cookies! What is not to love?!
    I'll keep my doubts to myself, and keep telling her how fun it will be, how much she's going to love it, and how great it will be to make both horesey and human friends.
     
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  7. Bakkir

    Bakkir Senior Member

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    17 is up there. I would send her and see how it goes. She will let you know if she is unhappy.
     
  8. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

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    It's like sending your first born to her first year at college. It'll work out, keep in touch with trainer and try not to worry, but be vigilant.

    Be brave, Jedi Knight.
     
  9. Whoa

    Whoa Senior Member

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    If the cost is not an issue, send her. If the money is an issue I would bank it and spend it on the colt. Get him started right and have a nice gelding for you to ride when he's ready.

    Coming of course, from someone who thinks 17 is old.:whistle:
     
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  10. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    You never want to hear what I have to say.

    She isn't going to ever be a beginner horse. If she wasn't one at the age she was when you got her, she isn't going to change with training.

    Keep her, let her be a pasture mate to a beginner horse you buy for yourself.
     
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