Halter Competition Training/Questions

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by QuarterHorseMomma, Sep 6, 2018.

  1. QuarterHorseMomma

    QuarterHorseMomma Senior Member

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    I wasn't quite sure where to post this. It has to deal with training and showing.

    At what age do you start showing in halter classes?

    At what age do you start training for halter classes?

    Do you board your horse or have it at home?

    Does this make a difference in the age you started showing?

    Also do you show your horse/weanling even if you know they won't place for the socialization/desensitization?


    Asking as my filly was born in May. However she just officially became mine two days ago. My plans is to start in halter and eventually hopefully get into Low Level Western Pleasure and Trail Competitions. However this will be my first time showing/training a horse for halter competitions. Im obviously going to consult a professional but wanted to see what others think.

    Any tips/trick are appreciated.
     

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  2. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    Congrats! You know we Need more pics, right?
     
  3. GotaDunQH

    GotaDunQH Senior Member

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    Showing halter is a great way to introduce a baby to the horse show atmosphere.

    For training, your baby needs to walk and trot next to you with no resistance, stand square and stand quietly for periods of time. This is something you can train on a daily basis.

    I'm unsure of what you mean about not placing for socialization? Halter is based on movement at the trot, and conformation.
     
  4. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

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    Did you mean just getting the baby out and used to the showing atmosphere? Otherwise, I don’t understand that question, either.
     
  5. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    I teach young horses to "set up" and do showmanship patters to make things interesting. I don't show halter for personal objections to the way some people raise halter horses and I won't even go there. I start it about as soon as the foal is halter broke for about 5 minutes at a time whenever I think about it, usually after riding another one. It also reiterates halter breaking, general handling, patience, body control etc. I think the training itself has a lot to offer a young horse, I just have issues with the actual halter horse breeders.
     
  6. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    I think she means, would you enter the horse to show it even if you knew the horse wouldn't place, just for the purpose of socializing it.
     
  7. horseingreyflannelsuit

    horseingreyflannelsuit Senior Member

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    For clarification purposes, I would like to know if the opster is interested in doing both . . . halter class and/ or showmanship in hand. There is a difference between the two and what training is needed. Need to realize that in halter classes the horse itself is being judged on conformation alone. Showmanship in hand however is just the opposite, the handler is being judged on how well the handler can set up their horse and cue horse without ever touching or pulling on lead line, halter or horse physically.

    Showmanship in hand is a lot to ask from a weanling and/ or yearling, but if you have a horse that has leg/hoof faults, or other conformation faults that isn't going to be a huge issue later on, its the way to go in getting it used to the show ring because the horse's conformation is not being judged at all. Only the handler. A well groomed and clean horse and handler is an absolute plus. In halter classes, you can get away with touching the horse physically to get it set up / square it up; but it is imperative that your horse be very straight legged. No toeing in or out, etc. . .

    In either class, your horse will need to be able to stand quietly in the position you put it in for up to about 40 minutes or so depending on how big the class is. The more horses in the class, the longer you and your horse must stand quietly.

    For showmanship in hand, you will need to teach your horse how to pivot correctly as well as how to walk, trot/jog, stop and start next to you without dragging you, or you dragging it. You may be asked to trot/jog your horse from a stop/stand position depending on the judge's request. Your horse must stand next to you or travel with you, without crowding you, pulling on lead , chewing on the lead or you. A mouthy horse is an absolute no no. Don't let your horse lean on you or rub its head on you. While a young horse hollering for a stall mate or replying to another horse that is screaming somewhere is understandable, it is undesirable as is a horse that is fidgeting and dancing around.

    As to the question of age, I've seen weanings in halter classes. For what its worth, it won't hurt a weaning to spend lots of time being handled and led all over the show grounds because the more sights and sounds and environment you expose it to, the better your horse will be able to handle different situations without coming unglued later on. Even if you don't enter a class, lots of exposure is a good thing.

    Most halter classes I'm sure are 30 to 40 minutes long. Training sessions should be short and sweet except where patience in standing still without fussing for 40 minutes is required. I would not ask a youngster under a year old to remain standing square for more than this unless the classes in your area for this age group last longer than this because their attention span is pretty short. I would not ask a youngster to do long sessions of pivoting, stopping/starting exercises as these can be quite taxing on a youngsters mind and you do not want your horse to start resenting training sessions. Short sessions of 15 minutes goes a long way.
     
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  8. QuarterHorseMomma

    QuarterHorseMomma Senior Member

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    Yes i hope after this storm is over to get more pictures for everyone!
     
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  9. QuarterHorseMomma

    QuarterHorseMomma Senior Member

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    Yes I mean entering even though your horse probably wouldn't win but entering for the exposure. Im thinking just halter as showmanship is a bit much for me to expect out of her with the amount of training she would be getting.
     

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