Ground manners - what are you strict about?

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by Blue-Roan, Aug 7, 2017.

  1. Zephyer1995

    Zephyer1995 Senior Member

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    Feeding manners is a huge one for me. I've had a few horses that were food aggressive and one was while I was pregnant (he had been starved when I picked him up). He had a habit of striking at anyone who went in his stall once he had grain. Since I have to go back in the stall to fill buckets and hang hay bags, he had to learn that aggression wasn't going to do anything but get him pushed away from his feed.

    This yearling filly got babied a little due to almost dying from a severe colic episode. She's gotten more than a few good whacks for getting pushy over food. Do NOT be cramming your head in the bucket before I'm done putting the food in. Do NOT be cramming your head in a bucket that I'm carrying elsewhere.

    Feet manners are important as well as not fighting or starting trouble with other horses while either horse is being handled. I hate nothing more than a horse that'll run by and kick at a horse in leading.
     
  2. CabterCrazy

    CabterCrazy Senior Member

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    Because they consider it love bites, and think it is so cute the horse is paying attention to them when they dont have treats for them
     
  3. StarPattern

    StarPattern Senior Member

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    Don't step on me, don't crowd me, don't try to rob my pockets and keep a respectful distance. Don't act like an idiot on the lead rope, stand nicely while tied and don't swing your body around while I'm trying to tack you up. Don't turn into a giraffe when it's time to bridle or deworm you. Don't bite, don't kick, don't rear.

    Basically, I want a horse that knows better than to act like an idiot. They know what they're supposed to do on the lead rope and it's up to them to remember their manners. But if they don't, I'd ask them to please not look so surprised when I demand manners.
     
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  4. CJ

    CJ Senior Member

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    No Teeth, No Feet, and Lead Nicely.
    I hate a puller or charger on the line. Pawing drives me crazy, and I want to be able to pass by or cut through a stall without the risk or threat of being hock-shot or double barrelled.
    BOs mini got a reputation for being "mouthy" when he was Young and teething. He didnt bite exactly but would open up and "bang with teef." A favorite story is BO taking him out for a lil grass time on a lead and cooing over him as they went, "Oh arent you cute, lets gets some grass, come on lil fella, blah blah .. OW! SOa %$#^*& !" Banged with teef. He outgrew it, mostly, but is not above a lil cheapshot. "Youll get flicked!" and a finger springloaded behind a thumb that stings an offending muzzle is something he comprehends, sort of respects, but doesnt fear.
     
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  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Most slaps are seen by the horse as an invitation to amp it up and play rougher.
     
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  6. .Delete.

    .Delete. Senior Member

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    Or "He's a stud, studs are more mouthy"
     
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  7. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I've had a rather peculiar 'discipline' problem with several horses I've owned.

    This is that they will touch me very lightly with their nose when they want something. In fact, if I'm not really concentrating, I don't notice it. This never escalates to biting and never becomes anything dangerous or pushy.

    They do this when they want and expect something. For example, if I'm delayed in turning the horses out, the horse would touch me very lightly, repeatedly, on the shoulder or back of the head, while I'm cleaning the stall. If the horse wants its water bucket filled he'll do the same.

    They don't do this about things that occur at a strict time on a fixed schedule (like getting fed). This is only for things that don't always occur at the same time each day. The turnout time, when I refill buckets, these tend to vary somewhat more than the exact time they're fed.

    For many years I've assumed this should be punished and would always escalate to more dangerous behavior. I'm beginning to have my doubts that this is true.

    It started in an odd way. My old horse Ben was crazy about a mare at the boarding barn. He was turned out with her until it was insisted upon by the owner that he was mounting her and making her back sore and he had to not be turned out any more with her.

    She was still in the stall next to him but not being turned out with him when the following happened.

    Another horse, Bob, whose stall was rather far from Ben's (across the arena), got out of his stall and came directly over to the mare's stall, unlatched her door, got in the stall with her, herded her OUT of the stall and into his stall. When I arrived the mare was trying to escape Bob's not-so-tender ministrations, and my horse was still in his stall going nuts.

    I had to brandish a whip at Bob to get him away from the mare, but I was able to catch her and put her back in her stall. I secured her and Bob's doors and went into my own horse's stall(he was still spinning around like mad).

    The MOMENT I got into Ben's stall, he began touching me very lightly, repeatedly, very quickly, on each shoulder, top of my head, waist and knees, over and over. Then he seemed to take a deep breath, sigh and relax.

    So from this I developed the idea that this sort of touching is an effort to communicate more complicated things.
     
  8. StarPattern

    StarPattern Senior Member

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    I have a cinchy horse. She's much better than when I first got her, but she still threatens to reach around on occasion. She stops very quickly when my elbow goes up. In the 5 or so years I've had her, she's never made contact with me... but the fact she threatens is more than enough. So she gets an elbow to the face whenever she turns her head if I'm at her cinch. That's another thing I can't abide by... cinchy horses. I get it, the process can be uncomfortable... but it doesn't mean they're allowed to nip. I do my best to make it a comfortable experience for them as I'm trying to retrain their habits, but god forbid they bite me. No no no.
     
  9. .Delete.

    .Delete. Senior Member

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    With horses as a whole, I don't even accept ear pinning. If I have ruled out ulcers/pain then there is NO reason for them to give attitude. Idc if they don't like the girth, their stall being cleaned, or whatever reason they decide to pin their ears AT me. That's a huge no to me but it leads to exactly what you describe, threats.

    I don't accept any sort of threat from a horse. EXCEPT if the horse is in pain (ulcers, wounded, etc) however even then those behaviors can lead to creating bad habits.
     
  10. StarPattern

    StarPattern Senior Member

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    I'm the same. My old Standardbred can be a grumpy mare and it's common for her to lay her ears back at something. A dog, the mailbox, possibly a tree blowing the wrong way. I don't care if she does it on her own time, but when she's attached to me in some capacity, the ears stay neutral. Everyone at the barn always laughs when we're on a ride and they hear me say, "Mare! Ears forward. Look happy!"

    And the ears pop forward.
     

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