GollyDolly - New Here Foaling Thread

Discussion in 'Horse Breeding' started by dollymama, May 30, 2016.

  1. dollymama

    dollymama Full Member

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    Wow so it has been a bit since I last updated.

    Last Tuesday, I hauled Molly and Dolly for the first time to my vet. Molly did a great job on her little trip to the vet at 90 days old. My friend and I got Molly loaded at the farm and vet without too much hassle. We still have to help heave her into the trailer, but Ms Molly did attempt to try a little on her own while leaving the vet.

    My vet was running late from another appointment so we got to hang out at his farm. I think she LOVED seeing all of the people and "talking" with horses. She whinnied more than I have ever heard her. She got a chance to play in a pasture and spent a lot of time being a nice little filly on her lead rope. She was brave and hopped on and off the scale without any issues (325 lbs! - Mama is 1,069 lbs). Dolly was more nervous about Molly whereas Molly just wanted to plunder and explore. Molly got an early Rhino vaccine and didn't even budge when the shot came.

    Mama is sound now which has been a long time coming! Next shoeing we are going with Epona shoes to have even more comfort and support on her digital cushion in the right front. But hearing my vet pronounce her sound while trotting on concrete was a pretty awesome moment.

    My vet advised against going to the inspection this week for a few reasons. My vet felt with how many hours in the trailer for a quick trip, exposure to other horses and lowered immunity due to her age, stress of hauling, the continued heat, it just is not worth the risk. He called one of the local farms that host Oldenburg GOV inspections while I was at the clinic to confirm their hosting next year's mare/foal inspections for Oldenburg GOV. I alerted the two German contacts I had been working with as well as the organizer for this week's inspection in GA. So Molly will be going with mom as a yearling next year at a farm less than 30 minutes away from home.

    Molly does have physitis in her ankles. My vet did not feel that it is a HUGE issue right now but he wanted her away from mom's mare and foal feed. So this past week we have transitioned Molly to Progressive's Foal Start milk pellets (the Progressive nutritionist would like to see Molly on this for a month) as well as Progressive's Rejuvenaide Plus liquid. She is at a higher dose of the liquid for two weeks and then we will re-evaluate her progress. I read that theoretically foals are supposed to love the stuff, Molly hates it so I have to coat the syringe I am using in molasses to make it a little more palatable. We are waiting for a new creep feeder to come in since apparently mom thinks the milk pellets are amazing as well. Ugh.

    Here are some updated photos.


    First the only photo I took on the vet adventure with one of the vet's who delivered her.

    The next are her quite dissatisfied with the Rejuvenaide dose (plastic gloves because that stuff is messy and makes me smell like I was involved in a GNC explosion)

    14368667_10154450662046774_5734469324076073804_n.jpg 14344081_10154460386956774_9155672238079656749_n.jpg IMG_1464.JPG IMG_1468.JPG IMG_1511.JPG
     
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  2. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    What a little lady she is! And how pretty she has become!
     
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  3. dollymama

    dollymama Full Member

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    Wow. It has been quite awhile since I have updated on anything.

    Molly continues to do well. She has quite the opinion on everything.

    Since the farm where both Mom and filly are at is small (and still under construction barn has not been built yet no other pastures cleared and fenced in) we are going to have to be creative with weaning. My vet feels that mom will wean her in the next couple of months so as long as weight is not continuing to drop we will keep them together and allow nature to take its course.

    Molly has had her feet done twice now, the third time will be on Thursday. She was quite the handful the second time, she figured out that she did not like her feet being trimmed and would prefer to do her own thing. The farrier has a partner and they have both handled quite a bit of foals so they were fast and efficient.

    Mom and daughter have to eat separately. Molly outgrew the fancy foal feeder within 10 days.. so she eats out of a bucket outside the stall and mom eats inside. Mom hates this because as soon as Molly has decided she has eaten enough (she is now solely on Progressive's Grass Balancer and Rejuvenaide Plus pellets), she will go off and do her own thing. Mom frets and wants to be out of the barn at that point.

    We make sure mom's food has the mash (soaked alfalfa and beet pulp) on the bottom with the mare and foal pellets on top so if Molly gets any of mom's food, she will only get the soaked mash.

    Both get free choice Timothy hay throughout the day-- they are rather spoiled. Molly gets some outside the barn, more inside the barn, and several flakes by their favorite tree. Mom also gets a flake of alfalfa at each meal.

    We were advised by an equine nutritionist to amp up the forage and decrease the mare and foal so we have added some top line support supplements (ProAdd Ultimate Supplement and Benefat) to also help mom. We also are getting the hay analyzed so we can make sure mom is getting enough.

    Molly is very bay now and inquisitive. She still likes to be nippy so we keep working on that -- a lunge whip was left in the field and Molly found it and tore up the handle in her play. She also enjoys antagonizing the barn owner's anxious German Shephard (He can't get to her) and she loves picking on the chickens.

    Here are some recent photos. I got 5 seconds of her trotting the other day.. but really she prefers napping, irritating the chickens, eating, or hopping around like a deer.

    molly hopping.jpg Molly Trotting.jpg 14572177_10154590190626774_7483775060868794076_n.jpg 14753795_10154574619601774_131811067069719506_o.jpg 14753498_10154574619596774_3070238289255903526_o.jpg
     
  4. Sarai

    Sarai Senior Member

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    Wow she's looking great! Thanks for the update! :)
     
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  5. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    What a pretty baby!
    Would it work to feed Molly inside and mom outside of the stall?
     
  6. dollymama

    dollymama Full Member

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    We tried. Molly is less food motivated than mom so once she realized she may be locked in and unable to do what she wanted to do she quickly decided it was not worth it. Mom, bless her, can always be bribed with a food bucket. Lol
     
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  7. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    She's growing up super straight and strong - pretty baby she is-!!
     
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  8. dollymama

    dollymama Full Member

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    Thank you I am definitely partial to her! :)
     
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  9. dollymama

    dollymama Full Member

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    Seeing Angelepenny's latest post on Winslow (which was so welcome to see how he is doing!) made me think I should update my own thread. It has been a couple of months!

    Molly is 212 days old.

    Unlike Winslow, she is still not weaned. Although, it has been a couple of weeks since I caught her nursing. My barn owner mentioned the other day when the girls were turned back out (we have had miserable weather here with the pasture under water so the girls had to stay in for a few days) that Mom went into nursing position and baby ignored her to go antagonize the chickens and find an alfalfa pile.

    To date we have had 3 farrier trims. The last one, was not so good. She wasn't "horrible" but she was pretty stubborn that she could try to spin around the world on three legs regardless if one foot was being held. My farrier had asked for us to let her go and said, she will tire, they all do. Molly apparently didn't get that memo.

    You will see in the recent picture Molly wears a permanent "handle." She is continually learning that if it is time to be fed and she has to go into the barn that trying to skirt away or run over a human is not appropriate. Lack of forward progress means lots of backing which she is not a fan of until she decides to move forward. Baby steps. She can be so incredibly bright frustratingly so, she quickly learned that if she didn't want to be caught for vets, farrier, grooming, feeding and if she didn't have on a halter and "handle" that she was SO much faster than a human. It is uncanny how respectful and cooperative she is with a halter on and lead rope.

    We actually see several trots now, but mostly she "pronks" like a Springbok ().

    Our forage tests came back and they were great, a lot of nutrients from our hay suppliers. We supplement some with alfalfa but still are feeding primarily Timothy. Other than that, we are still on the Rejuvenaide Pellets and a grass balancer. Both mom and Molly get free choice hay (true hay burners) since the pasture is really dormant now. We are trying to figure out how to best divide the pasture. On a 3.5 acre pasture, the girls refuse to use one entire side. They are RARELY over in the other side and tend to like to hang on the side closest to the chickens, gate, and road. Its bizarre. I almost blame mom who has never been one to actually roam and graze she would always graze closely to the gate as if waiting for the humans to bring her back in - I used to think it was her way of conserving maximum energy.

    Here are a few pics 1) Turnout after the torrential rains when the pasture finally drained, Molly antagonizing one of the barn owner's dogs (her favorite toy is the neurotic German Shephard who will run up and down the fence line barking. She basically glares at him and sends him in a frenzy.. and sometimes she will even try to back up to the fence to let him think he MAY be able to get to her... it doesn't matter if you just fed her.. if that dog is outside she wants to torture him), 3) First taste of Snow and Ice (she learned quickly that galloping and slamming on brakes in a corner will mean that a filly will fall flat on her side and then be offended with how dare the slick white stuff makes things) and 4) the regal stance with said handle

    turn out after pasture draining.jpg Antagnozing the dog.jpg Molly first snow.jpg Molly standing.jpg
     
  10. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Wow has she grown up strong, those hindquarters-!! Your fawn has turned into a magnificent babe. ;)
     
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