Girth pulling saddle back?

Discussion in 'Tack & Equipment' started by sandstorm, Feb 4, 2017.

  1. sandstorm

    sandstorm Senior Member

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    I'm currently working with a fitter to get a new saddle for my horse, but in the meantime I'm hoping to find some temporary solution. I know my saddle bridges slightly and doesn't give my horse's big shoulders enough room, so I assumed those two things caused my saddle to slide back despite her downhill build. However, I paid closer attention today and grabbed a few pictures of before and after. It looks to me like the girth starts to slide back before the saddle does. It's currently on the first and third billet straps. Is there anything I can change to stop the girth from sliding back while I wait on a new saddle?

    saddle fitting pictures in this thread: CC saddle for wide back & high withers?

    note: tightening the girth as tight as I can get it stops the issue at stage 2, but then it's tight enough I can feel my horse moving differently because of it

    Start of the ride girth hangs straight down from billet straps
    IMG_20170204_112448537.jpg

    5 minutes later girth is starting to move billet straps to angle them towards the back of the saddle
    IMG_20170204_112400191.jpg

    10 minutes after that the girth is leading the charge towards her tail
    IMG_20170204_110727139.jpg
     
  2. savethewhaley

    savethewhaley Senior Member

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    I will look at pics in a minute, but what billets are you using to attach the girth? Try putting the girth on the first two and see if it makes any difference.
    It also may help that you get a girth that either is a different texture or a different shape. I notice you have a flat fleece girth. Fleece is very slippery over hair and may be contributing to the slipping. Contoured girths might also be better for her, as it looks like she doesn't really have a 'girth area.' A girth that is shaped a little differently might make slipping a little more difficult.
    Your saddle is slipping back a little as well, which tells me that your saddle is too small for the shoulders and possibly be too narrow or wide- as you said, you've already acknowledged this.
     
  3. savethewhaley

    savethewhaley Senior Member

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    Try your other saddle unless you tried it and had a further problem, I actually liked that one better from a quick look.
    Edit: Just saw that you said it has very little contact through the back. Still that way when girthed up? Does she engage properly and work through her back during your ride (just from her muscling I am guessing not)?
    Sorry for all the questions, let me know if you need anything else. :)
     
  4. sandstorm

    sandstorm Senior Member

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    you mean the one on the last page of the other thread? That one was for sale locally and I took it on trial, for the day. It fit her shoulders better, but the tree was too curvy and left the most complete dry spots I have every seen: perfect outline of the front of the panels and back to where the saddle lifted off of her back were totally dry.
     
  5. savethewhaley

    savethewhaley Senior Member

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    I apologize, I did see that when I went back and looked.
    Was the saddle lifting off her back only in the very back? Some saddles are made like this nowadays to 'allow for engagement of the back'- I'm not sure how true that is, but if it's just coming up off the very back, I would still say that is your better option. Much better fit in the shoulders and I think it will be less of a problem when your horse starts working as she should. :)
     
  6. sandstorm

    sandstorm Senior Member

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    Sadly, no. It put tons of pressure at the front and middle of the panels. Absolutely not something I would spend $2k on while I wait on a permanent saddle.
     
  7. savethewhaley

    savethewhaley Senior Member

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    You are brave spending 2k on a temporary saddle...
    Maybe an SMB neoprene girth or a TSF or similar contour girth?
     
  8. sandstorm

    sandstorm Senior Member

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    I thought those girths were for a forward girth groove that pulls the saddle forward. If the girth is pulling the saddle back, wouldn't that be the opposite of what I need?
     
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  9. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Breast collar.
     
  10. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Different horses need different girth setups and as manes' mentions, some horses also need a breast collar if switching girth types doesn't fix saddle movement. This particular horse may need the breast collar...look at the contour at the bottom where the current girth is sliding through. It's nearly straight front to back, so there's no much to keep things in place.
     
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