For Those with DSLD Horses

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Sue B, Apr 7, 2008.

  1. Sue B

    Sue B Senior Member+

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    I'm curious to kow if anyone with a DSLD horse or with horses that exhibit symptoms of DSLD....if those horses are also insulin resistant?
     
  2. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member

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    Interesting question!!! Where are you going with this? :D
     
  3. oldhorsehome

    oldhorsehome Senior Member

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    What's DSLD? :eek:
     
  4. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member

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    Degenerative Suspensory Ligament Desmitis - basically a structural breakdown of the suspensory ligament (hinds most often, most often bilateral). No cure, manageable for some time period through proper nutrition and hoof care, progressive, most often ends up in the horse being put down.
     
  5. CJ

    CJ Senior Member

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    [​IMG] Shenandoah seems to have had the conformation of a DSLD, but not a degenerative problem. He didnt have any signs of dietary problems either til he went catalytic @ age 23. No problem showed up for insulin in the CBC. *He spent most of his time with me @50-100 lbs lighter than that^. His 1st owner fed him a/2 daily large coffee can Packed w/ sweet feed.
     
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  6. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member

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    CJ, if I had to guess, I might guess that your horse was fairly post-legged to begin with, and that conformational flaw can lead to the issue seen in this picture - coon-footed. I don't see the thickening of the suspensory area that I believe is common with DSLD. DSLD does though end up leading to straighter and straighter hocks due to the lack of support, so the end results can look similar, but come about from the different originations.
     
  7. CJ

    CJ Senior Member

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    "Post legged & coon footed" is actually how I always described him. That and "Conformation of a cow". 1 vet told me "his hindlegs are going" when he was 8; it was actually his Knees that got unsteady, when he was 20+.
     
  8. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member

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    Yep - his postleggedness eventually caused his pasterns to drop, as the suspensories are not meant to take the sort of stress that straight hocks make them take.

    I'd be willing to bet also that he spent too much time with too much extra weight on his front end, because of the hind end issues, which eventually caused issues up front.
     
  9. CJ

    CJ Senior Member

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    *sorry, sue :blushing: *

    JB- Since/Shen was overattheknee imo to boot, it was no surprise that he got unsteady there when old. A lil surprise it took that long. A Pleasant surprise his suspensories never failed him totally. I wish I had the video of him under saddle on disk instead of tape only.
     
  10. Sue B

    Sue B Senior Member+

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    Just thinking.....my Peruvian doesn't have DSLD, but is a severe metabolic case which is now for the most part under control. In the last 3 years, he has only suffered from about a 2 week "melt down" in late Februrary to early March. During this time he is very weak in the hind quarters and drops to his fetlocks in the back legs.He is also severely cresty and with a very hard crest during that time. He also lays down a lot and appears to be in pain in the rear muscles. However, just as quick as the onset....it seems to resove itself and he is back to playing and bucking with no DSLD symptoms. He has been checked for thickening of the lateral branches and we found only a slight amount on one side where he had an old injury.

    So.....I was talking with my friend that has a late onset diabetic cat. She says that she knows when he needs a change in insulin because he pees excessively and "walks on his hocks". I researched this and found that there is a name for that stance and that the cause is glucose toxicity that causes neuopathy (sp?) and hind end weakness...with or without pain. She says that as soon as adjustments are made that he is fine again. The last time he had this was not a result of insulin changes being needed...but a direct result of a change in food...even though the food is specifically designed for diabetic cats!

    Anyway....I was this slight connection and thought that it was food for thoughtl What do you think?
     

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