Flash 2015 colt

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by mkoktavy, Jan 3, 2017.

  1. Bakkir

    Bakkir Senior Member

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    I was having the same issues with Charms feet.

    The ferrier was not taking off the flare and he was causing her to grow too much toe on the inside wall and it made her stand oddly. So I fired him.

    2 trims with a barefoot specialist and I can finally see an improvement.

    Plus I love how easy my new ferrier is to talk to.
     
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  2. mkoktavy

    mkoktavy Senior Member

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    Awesome! Thanks @ginster ! Looks like I will have to discuss with my farrier..
     
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  3. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

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    I’m with others. Not loving he trim. Just too much left on and I don’t even like how forward the shoe is set on. It’s not back st his heels to provide full support to his leg.

    In my experience it’s not worth talking with a carrier. They are the expert, and if this is how he trims/shoes, he isn’t likely to change simply by a chat with an owner. It’s a bit like trying to tell the Dr how to do their job unfortunately. :(
     
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  4. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    If he grows enough horn a good barefoot trimmer is all he needs. Plus, what's his living conditions? Too soggy conditions are bad for the horn, too much time in a stall is bad for the horn.

    The best thing you can do is find a barefoot trimmer who shows you how to trim him yourself.

    Those shoes that are on now I would take off immediately. Looks completely unbalanced, looks like someone who cuts away something at random and slaps the shoes on - finished. Not worth a penny of your money.
     
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  5. mkoktavy

    mkoktavy Senior Member

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    I hauled in for another lesson the other day, I was all by myself so unfortunately didn’t get any photos or videos... but I did have my dad come out to the barn with me last night and take a couple vids while we practiced :) I posted them through Facebook so hopefully most people have access to view...

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    Coach had me take a little bit more contact on him and work on a bit of a rounder frame and getting him to sit back when I use my outside rein (which is still a work in progress!!) also had me massaging my inside rein to the right as he was really stiffening his jaw right.
    Had a few “aha!” moments while working on the half halt, one excercise we did that really helped me was a 10 meter half circle to turn down centreline at the trot, he is quite forward and covers a lot of ground so I had to be especially careful to prepare with the outside rein to make the turn. Once I was actually really concentrating on making the turn (rather than just half halting on a straigtaway) I felt a few moments where he shifted weight back and slowed to make the turn.
    We did quite a bit of half halt preparing for the turn across the diagonal, and man do I wish I had a video person for that, I felt like flash floated across when I let him go! He did only get about halfway through the diagonal before I felt him flop on the forehand which I have to remember to prepare for beforehand so I can engage my half halt before we hit the next corner to turn anyway. ..
    I am so happy to take lessons again as I haven’t worked on any of this in so long with not riding, it’s been a fabulous refresher!

    The videos posted above I still see I’m not getting enough of a consistent contact but I think it’s slowly getting better.. I will keep working on it! I’ve also noticed that when I’m concentrating too much my natural hunt seat “duck butt” comes back... will have to pay more attention to that as well... man does it feel good to get back into the saddle again though!

    C94D3159-D113-41F7-ADBC-6F169634ED35.jpeg
     
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  6. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    Looks not bad, he is quite green so inconsistant contact is not surprising.

    I think you have a problem with your lower leg, have you ever tried to shorten the stirrups one hole and put your heel down? He is very forward (not surprising for a carriage horse) but that doesn't mean you should just let him do as he pleases.

    You can bring your calf better to the horse to actually use it for aids and driving him into the bit if your stirrup is slightly shorter and you put down the heels instead.
     
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  7. mkoktavy

    mkoktavy Senior Member

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    I did notice this when watching these videos... I'll try shortening my stirrups a hole. This is a new saddle still so still getting used to it as well!

    ETA the more I look at it I think my lower leg is what's causing my duck butt... I will play around with it!
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2018
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  8. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Very pretty-!!
     
  9. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    You fall forward with your upper body while your leg is unstable, it's not so much a "butt" problem.

    What I also see, you let him rush at the trot, at exactly the speed he finds comfortable. He is at a stage where you should start with frequent hand changes and smaller circles (working at the bend, correctly switching outer rein each time) That will slow him down and get him to use his body more. You can also start with walk-trot transitions. Will also slow him down. Don't let him get into his "carriage funk" where eating miles and pushing with his hind legs is his only goal. Let him do loops around those jumping obstacles.

    At that stage you could ride him in a jumping saddle, at the canter he might profit from a bit more energy, riding him forwards in a half seat.
     
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  10. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

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    I can’t se the videos - wifi isn’t strong enough and the videos keep carping out. :(. The joys of being on vacation in the middle of freaking no where!!!!

    I will try to watch them & comment in the up coming days. If I don’t tag me and remind me. I may be able to offer some suggestions for the rider position :)
     
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