Fencing - should I use electric?

Discussion in 'Tack & Equipment' started by buddytink, May 29, 2018.

  1. buddytink

    buddytink Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2008
    Messages:
    1,413
    Likes Received:
    171
    We're building new fencing at out new place. We have metal T-post already put up but trying to decide on what kind of fence. I was thinking about the polyrope electric, maybe 4 or 5 strands?? And let it be a permanent fence. But not very experienced with polyrope so not sure if it holds up good or if it works good? Anyone have this kind of fencing?

    I have the metal wire electric now but i have smooth wire fencing and two strands of the metal wire electric. But the wire electric breaks and stretches easily...
     
    Alsosusieq2 likes this.
  2. slc

    slc Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    22,727
    Likes Received:
    13,699
    I would use the rope but select a premium grade like electrobraid for longer life, better conducting and more resilience.

    Every electric fence system is dependent on how good its ground system is, if it's in an area that has some moisture all year, if it's adequate for the charger and amount/length of fence, et .

    I have both a ground rod system and a ground wire (one wire of fence connected to ground). That works really well. The ground rods are in an area that stays moist all year, but I still use one of the five strands as a ground wire. What can I say, I'm a nerd, lol. It works incredibly well.
     
    Alsosusieq2 and buddytink like this.
  3. DelP

    DelP Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2013
    Messages:
    2,920
    Likes Received:
    5,288
    Have you looked at Hotcote? I’ve got some neighbors with it and I’m impressed. Top and bottom wire is hot, and middle wire is ground so there is a shock even when the ground is super dry. It’s held up very well with minimal labor (mostly tightening).

    One of the neighbor’s horses ran into it at a full gallop and he just bounced backwards. Vet confirmed minor abrasions.

    I’m thinking about replacing my current fence with it.
     
    Alsosusieq2 and buddytink like this.
  4. buddytink

    buddytink Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2008
    Messages:
    1,413
    Likes Received:
    171
    No i haven't heard of it but will definitely check it out as well. Thanks!
     
    Alsosusieq2 likes this.
  5. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Messages:
    35,831
    Likes Received:
    69,017
    Me? i would use field fence, wooden braces ever 100 ft along with wooden corner posts and braces, the T post 10' apart in between, then just run a strand of elec wire on top.

    One bad wind storm where something falls on your electric fence, and all the horses are loose.
     
    Alsosusieq2, DelP and buddytink like this.
  6. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2005
    Messages:
    16,713
    Likes Received:
    8,949
    I agree with this. I hate the electric fence I grew up with.
     
  7. DelP

    DelP Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2013
    Messages:
    2,920
    Likes Received:
    5,288
    This is what I currently have and it is very functional and has held up with minimal repairs for 18 years. My only complaint is that I have to weedwhack/spray the fence line instead of mow.
     
    Alsosusieq2 and buddytink like this.
  8. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Messages:
    35,831
    Likes Received:
    69,017
    You mow the perimeter by steering with your left hand, and a weedwacker in your right hand. :p
    It's a bit tricky, but in low gear, works out fine~!!
     
    Alsosusieq2 and DelP like this.
  9. tlwidener

    tlwidener Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2008
    Messages:
    15,910
    Likes Received:
    14,338
    I like electric fence, but I don't have trees. The main problem I have with electric is getting a good ground because it is so dry here. I also have to periodically tighten fences; they sag in the heat.

    No matter what you use, cap the t-posts if the ends are exposed.

    My current paddock fences are the detestable welded wire fence for sheep and goats. I HATE that stuff. To make it safer I've added two electric wires on 5" insulators to keep my horses off the welded wire. They're fairly large paddocks, so I don't anticipate that horses will be against the fences all that much.

    If I could do anything I'd do Ramm Flex fence. I loved it at my last place. You can't put it on t-posts though. Hotcote works okay, but IME it was hard to install; the ends were hard to crimp properly. I would also look pretty hard at Horse Guard tape.
     
    Alsosusieq2 likes this.
  10. harli36

    harli36 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2004
    Messages:
    5,434
    Likes Received:
    2,859
    Since you already have your posts in, you should check to see how far apart the posts should be on any rope style fence you look at. Some of the brands (like electrobraid) require posts to be spaced very far apart. That allows the give necessary in the fence for the horse to bounce off of it. Otherwise the horses get cut by the fence. I haven’t had luck with the cheap versions of electrobraid working well either. They sagged constantly. I would nix the idea of a braided rope entirely and use horseguard. It works wonderfully in heat, wind, snow and trees.
     
    Alsosusieq2 and buddytink like this.

Share This Page