Feeding a fat horse molasses + rain scald

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by willoway, Apr 20, 2017.

  1. willoway

    willoway Registered

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    My fat horse's pasture diet has changed, before she was getting near free choice, fresh grass, now she gets the grass that's been grazed over by a hard keeper first with no rest period, supplemented by some hay to keep her gut working if other horse has done a good job eating. Her weight is better since but no dramatic change. The thing is I never had any problems at all with her besides weight when she was on the green grass and she was on it during seasonal flushes and over a very wet, warm winter. Now if she goes on the green grass she gets very spooky, her hard feed which she was doing amazing on originally was designed for horses on HQ pasture that didn't need extra fat. Recently she's gotten stubborn rain scald, has a dry coat (she used to be so shiny!) and allergies all new. In the past she would get a few lumps when flies were out but they cleared up within a day, but in the last few months she been covered with welts and had runny eyes, thing did still clear up before I could call the vet out to be fair. I've been thinking she might be helped by a feed change to something with a higher vitamin a/e content to reflect the pasture diet change. I have a good mineral supplement I know at least won't affect her adversely so is worth a try and I feed her that with meadow chaff. If I add a tablespoon or so of molasses for taste, diluted with water, is that acceptable, or a terrible idea for a fat horse.

    Also any advice on what could be causing her skin issues or controlling a fat horses weight would be appreciated. If she doesn't show any improvement by end of week I'm calling a vet regardless but information is always a plus.
     
  2. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Rain scald is likely rain rot, and is due to the coat being wet and to the bites of insects. Changing her feed won't help that.

    If she is on the grass and getting very spooky, and is overweight, and especially as she's on grass during 'seasonal flushes' and rainy periods, I would be extremely concerned that she's seriously overfed and could be running into metabolic problems, now or very soon.

    I don't think a tablespoon of molasses is a big deal, but I'd be extremely worried about the overweight, and grazing her with a muzzle on or cutting her pasture time. Hay doesn't just 'keep her guts working', it has calories too.
     
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  3. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Yep. I don't think a T of molasses is tragic but if she's overweight get a grazing muzzle on her and avoid the molasses.

    Get the vet out. For me, when I see a coat change there's a reason. It's your number one indicator for feed issues/illness. It's not an emergency vet call, but get them out next week.
     
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  4. gaitedboomer

    gaitedboomer Senior Member

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    Please read the entire page,

    Vitamin A in Horses

    Not enough Vitamiin A affects a lot of things, including poor immune system and night vision.

    Poor pasture and old hay can often be the culprits
     
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  5. willoway

    willoway Registered

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    Her current weight is nothing to get scared about, just something that needs to be kept in check so it doesn't become a problem in the future. It's just these problems cropped up after her grass was restricted not before and I made the connection that there could be something in the green grass which she's now lacking hence trying a higher spec mineral supplement. She's worked and fussed over daily so any changes are noticed and the vet will certainly be called if there is no improvement or any deterioration :)

    Thanks for the article, I'm not so sure she is vitamin A deficient but maybe lacking enough to make her more susceptible to skin conditions?
     
  6. gaitedboomer

    gaitedboomer Senior Member

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    That is possible. A horse can be healthy as all get-out, shiny coat, hooves that glisten in the sun and still deal with excess dander, allergic reaction to bites.

    I am forum acquainted with a credible/common sense horse owner who will occasionally foster horses for a 501(c)3 rescue. If they come to her with rainrot, etc. she will buy injectable Vitamin A&D from Tractor Supply and feed it ORALLY.

    5CC's mixed in the feed pan, followed by 5CC's ten days later. No more due to A&D both being fat soluble and store in the liver.

    She stated that had always been enough of a boost to the immune system for the skin issues to clear up.

    Flax (I use Omega-3 Horsehine) also helps most horses but not all. It didn't help my Arab with sweet itch and Neck threadworms also a result of Midge fly bites. I dosed his 13.3H self with two full tubes of Pure Ivermectin at once. His poor skin had one major outburst when the microfiliae under the skin were dying off and that was it. His coat suddenly became soft as a stuffed toy and had its shine back. He was around 26? at that time, made it three more years without having anymore sweet itch episodes. RIP My little Sweetie Face who neverrrrrr did anythinnnnnng wronnnng:)
     
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  7. gaitedboomer

    gaitedboomer Senior Member

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    That is possible. A horse can be healthy as all get-out, shiny coat, hooves that glisten in the sun and still deal with excess dander, allergic reaction to bites.

    I am forum acquainted with a credible/common sense horse owner who will occasionally foster horses for a 501(c)3 rescue. If they come to her with rainrot, etc. she will buy injectable Vitamin A&D from Tractor Supply and feed it ORALLY.

    5CC's mixed in the feed pan, followed by 5CC's ten days later. No more due to A&D both being fat soluble and store in the liver.

    She stated that had always been enough of a boost to the immune system for the skin issues to clear up.

    Flax (I use Omega-3 Horsehine) also helps most horses but not all. It didn't help my Arab with sweet itch and Neck threadworms also a result of Midge fly bites. I dosed his 13.3H self with two full tubes of Pure Ivermectin at once. His poor skin had one major outburst when the microfiliae under the skin were dying off and that was it. His coat suddenly became soft as a stuffed toy and had its shine back. He was around 26? at that time, made it three more years without having anymore sweet itch episodes. RIP My little Sweetie Face who neverrrrrr did anythinnnnnng wronnnng:)
     
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  8. willoway

    willoway Registered

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    I don't know as much as I should about finer points of the immune system (microbes yes, mammalian biology sadly very spotty). I know I personally take vitamin C when I start feeling a cold coming, I haven't had a proper cold in years and I used to get them bad. I might still talk to the vet first before trying to dose her up on vitamin A but it does make sense to me that maybe her immune system could just do with a good boost instead of a long term increase.
     
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  9. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    I'd call the lady at myfineequine.com and get the horse some KLNZ. Tell her what all has happened, and all the horse's problems and she will recommend what to give them. She has powdered supplements that are all natural and contain things horses would eat in the,wild, but can't get in captivity. The KLNZ boost the immune system by helping to cleanse the liver and kidneys.

    She's very helpful and will spend lots of time with you on the phone. I highly recommend her and her products.
     
  10. Winchester

    Winchester Senior Member

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    False. First thing to look at is nutrition. Good nutrition = strong immune system able to combat diseases. Across the board for horses, humans, dogs, cats, basically anything that breathes and eats.
     
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