Favorite exercises for young/green horse?

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by Preppy_Ponies, Nov 19, 2018.

  1. Preppy_Ponies

    Preppy_Ponies Senior Member

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    What are your favorite undersaddle training exercises when working with a green or young horse? I know with each horse you adjust methods a bit to suit their needs but it's always useful to add a few more things to my repertoire.

    The horse in question at the moment will likely end up doing h/j and some eventing.
     
  2. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Going in straight lines, brief ride, get er done and get off.
     
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  3. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Yes, riding straight lines and learning how to balance themselves in occasional circles. Teaching them side passing and giving to your leg, incorporating a bit of trail obstacles are good learning tools. Side passing over a log etc. I hope I understood you. It's never too soon to teach those things IMO.
     
  4. turnnburnlynx

    turnnburnlynx Senior Member

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    I like to introduce them to things they will see on the trail, or at shows. Like those fake flowers, water jumps, etc, bit I'm a non stressful way. Walking by them, etc
     
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  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I worked with someone for many years who, well, had his problems, but the one thing he did right was 'benign neglect' of youngsters. It used to astound me the way he'd get up on them in the morning, even when it was cold, often before they'd even gotten turned out(and quite often they only turned out for a few hours in a not-so-huge paddock.

    And they'd plod around, walk, trot canter a little, 10 minutes, no longeing, and 'get the hail off.' He'd strip off the saddle and bridle and let them loose, and they would run and buck and tear around like maniacs. CLEARLY they weren't tired or worn out, and they weren't drugged. In fact they were fresh as daisies. It was 3, 4 times a week, ten minutes. That was it.

    And frankly, he really put off a lot of stuff. They didn't get a lot of 'ground' work or get put in and out of the trailer, or taken places, or nothing. They just got to 'be.' Be out with a bunch of other horses, eat, graze, sleep.

    And if they WEREN'T quiet, he'd laugh at them and say, 'what a jerk' and just go on and do it again tomorrow. He didn't run them, he didn't longe, ground drive, round pen, nothin'. If they acted stupid he'd say, 'what d'ya expect? He's 3 <bleep> years old!'

    A lot of other trainers called him lazy. They had their horses tearing around the ring like gangbusters at 3, or 2 1/2, legs flying all over the place, looking 'fancy' and 'advanced' and 'on the bit'(head up, nose on vertical), and just gorgeous, you know?

    Well, a fair number of their horses didn't stay sound.

    The ones he did that way - they stayed sound. And they didn't get sour, either. They acted like jerks at their first show, obviously, but they were excited, happy, having a great time. They were happy campers.

    I'd have changed a few things, but not much.

    I was thinking about it some time ago, at a stallion evaluation.

    Some people came out, the 3 and 4 year old stallions were there, noodling along, correct, not a mess, you know, dressage, but baby style, and there was one ridden by an 'expert' who had that young horse going around like he was flying, eyes bugging out of his head, knees up around his eyeballs.

    Which ones do you think will be going Grand Prix in 10 years? Being happy schoolmasters in 20 years?
     

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