Fast Trot vs Extended Trot

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by jojozwiebel, Sep 18, 2018.

  1. spec

    spec Full Member

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    I have truly never met a rider who doesn't use verbal cues ever. I know lots of riders in many disciplines (but not dressage admittedly--but OP isn't a dressage rider anyway).
    I use verbals as reinforcement. If my horse isn't moving off my legs in a timely manner I'll click to him. I also like my horses to stop with just a "whoa" and a deep sit.
    As to the subject.... I suck at extended trot also so I'm here to learn. Prime reason I don't do HUS, ha!
     
    Arem and secuono like this.
  2. StraightandTrue

    StraightandTrue Senior Member

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    This is my definition of "through" which I explained precisely because people have different ideas about what "through" means. I am not claiming it is the one and only true definition of the term, just my interpretation of it. My goal is for the OP to be able to understand what I'm saying instead of simply throwing dressage terminology around without explaining what those words actually mean - which some members on here are rather good at.
     
  3. StraightandTrue

    StraightandTrue Senior Member

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    @jojozwiebel there is nothing wrong with voice cues - I use them all the time - but they are there to *support* your physical cues not replace them. You describe that your cue to extend the trot is to hiss like a snake, grab the horn and post to the trot. None of these things are an effective aid to get the horse to activate his hind end, lift over his back, or stretch into the contact.

    The hissing just means go faster but stay in trot. Grabbing the horn... why? Are you having trouble staying in the saddle? If so then your top priority should be improving your seat, not the extended trot. Practice riding without stirrups to get your thighs and lower leg to relax, and allow your pelvis to absorb the movement of the horse's trot. Posting to the trot also doesn't help the horse activate behind or lift its back. I can switch between rising trot and sitting trot and my horse doesn't (shouldn't) change her tempo or stride length. You need to use effective aids - leg, seat and reins - to shape the quality of the trot. The cue for extended trot is not a single button you need to press, but many buttons all at once. Not even buttons, more like valves you need to tweak and adjust to get the right amount of energy from behind, lift over the back, and carriage in front.
     
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  4. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    In Ranch Riding it used to be the "in" thing to grab the horn for extended trots and extended lopes. So maybe she is talking more about extending for Ranch Riding. Found out used to be because the top riders seem to no longer do that as I looked for a video. Finally found one that held the horn.

    [video]
     
  5. jojozwiebel

    jojozwiebel Full Member

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    For ranch riding you are allowed to grab the horn. Plus he is not very smooth, which makes the posting easier.

    I use my spurs to "pick him up" and this brings down his head, too. I also bump the reins so he moves into the bit.

    Thanks for the detail!!
     
  6. jojozwiebel

    jojozwiebel Full Member

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    And with the voice cues... This is an addition to using my legs and body. If I do not hiss, I expect me horse to walk faster. If I hiss and bump, I expect a jog. If I bump, use my body, and hiss, I expect a faster trot. If I use outside leg and kiss, I expect a lope. A woah is saying woah, sitting back, and applying pressure with both spurs.

    And I know how to ride... I'm not a dummy. But I was just curious as to what everyone else did or if there were exercises recommended.

    I ride HUS, ranch, and pleasure so I know they are all different.

    Thanks for the insight so far.
     
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  7. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    It's just wrong. We've gone through this before. You like to make up your own definitions for dressage words instead of learning them and understanding them, and applying them to your riding.
     
  8. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    Do words 'belong' to dressage?

    It is helpful if everyone in dressage kind of agrees what terms mean, but then how long could we debate a good half halt? It really does mean so many things, in strength and use.

    If people are using words we are familair with in the context of their own discipline does it make it wrong? I mean I know for a fact that jam is what you spread on bread with peanut butter, jelly is a wobbly thing that you have for dessert.
     
  9. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

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    To the bold:
    You are getting what you’re asking for - a faster trot. Are you wanting a lengthen or extend trot or are you happy with the faster trot you are getting??
     
  10. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    I do actually see slc’s point here. There are certain terms that are commonly applied to certain disciplines. No one would use “jog” to describe a working trot in a dressage test for example. Or “leg yield” to describe a rein back.

    So with a term like “through” which is commonly used in dressage, using it in a way that isn’t really how it’s commonly used muddies waters more than clarifies them.

    It’s not like, for example, the word “rein,” which can be used to denote a piece of tack, a direction (on the left rein), a cue (rein in), or a disciple (reining), among other things. It’s something that actually does have a meaning specific to a discipline.

    And I’ll be honest, it’s not a definition I fully understand. We haven’t reached “through.” We’re barely at “somewhat in synch.”
     
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