Eye Trauma Pictures

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by bmille40, May 19, 2017.

  1. bmille40

    bmille40 Registered

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    Hi! Im new here!

    My poor baby yesterday morning came inside the barn from the night turnout with a badly injured eye. We do not know at all what happened.

    She seems to have a poke, plus cornea pulling away? Vet has come out and said it has to go, he can not remove it till Wednesday. She does appear blind totally in the eye.


    Vet says he will remove it on the farm, just lay her in the grass ( Only $700 in fees). Is this okay? IDK Im just an irrational nervous crazy lady right now. She is on banamine, sulfur pill antibiotic, and antibiotic for eye.

    How will my poor girl change? Does she for sure need the eye out? They said yes for sure, I would spend more trying to save it in antibiotics, etc. What is you guys on what happened ( no junk/bad fencing/halter)? Im thinking scratching face from flies. :( I guess could I or the barn I board at done something different? [​IMG] Miss Kitty, and her poor eye. ( I lighten up the last picture.
    Can you share pictures of your horses sockets? Its so stupid but they freak me out... Im sure in two months Ill think they are the most beautiful ever! Pictures are her on better days, first two day 1 and second are day 2. IMG_1780.JPG IMG_1968.JPG IMG_1971.JPG IMG_2081.JPG IMG_2086.JPG
     
  2. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

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    We cannot give you advice. If you are having doubts, you need to call another vet and get a 2nd opinion. Eye injuries are nothing to mess with. I would be hauling to a GOOD vet that specializes in horses for a 2nd opinion.
     
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  3. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    Eye Injuries are extremely painful and are prone to terrible infections. If they can not be repair it than the kindest thing to do for her is to remove the eye. You can have a special orb put into the eye socket and then they sew the eye lid closed or a prosthetic eye. This is something that I would take my horse to one of the big vet schools for or a large Equine Hospital to in order to get the best cosmetic appearance.

    She may get more nervous about sounds on the blind side. She may want to turn her head when you ride to see something on the other side.
     
  4. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    This is a horrific injury and there is no way that eye can be saved. The eyeball itself has been severely punctured. To delay surgery any longer would be abusive, plain and simple.

    Why would you not believe your vet when s/he says the eye has to come out? This is one thing that just is really not hard to determine. The injury is severe, there's no 'grey area'(meaning there's no doubt).

    The 'hole' that's left after surgery has healed, really looks like nothing at all, it's clean, dry and not very large. It's simply a depression where the eye used to be. Most people don't get a prosthetic eye for the area. It just is that easy to get used to.

    Most people simply take their photos from the other side of the horse.

    Even a horse in the Kentucky Derby had only one eye. Ran just fine. Some horses are nervous after losing an eye but others are not and adjust quickly.

    It's sad, but like so many, many things in life, you get used to it and you just go on and eventually it just doesn't seem so bad. And you will probably be surprised at how easy it is to get used to it. Life is about change all the time. You just pull up your socks and go on.

     
    Last edited: May 19, 2017
  5. SparkleDust

    SparkleDust Senior Member

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    So sorry this happened! She's a very pretty girl, despite the eye.

    I have known of multiple one-eyed horses who have been great riding mounts. I've even met a blind mare who is still successfully ridden. She will be much more comfortable with that eye removed and she'll adjust to the vision impediment. :)

    (PS: surgeries on-sight are very common and any good vet takes all sterile precautions. You can opt to haul her to a veterinary clinic or university if you would rather the surgery be done there.)
     
  6. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    They just look like a horse with a hollow at the eye socket. It's going to be sewn and have an area for drainage. I would NEVER have this done at the farm. The horse needs serious IV pain meds for a couple days.

    Be very careful working around the horse right after because the pain is bad and they DO NOT want to be messed with. Don't go in and pet and talk to her. The horse will be consumed with the fact the whole world looks different and it's all their mind can take to deal with the pain. It hurts to eat.

    We had a couple over the years, in our barn at the track. They adjust well to it over time.
     
  7. Suzanneszoo

    Suzanneszoo Senior Member

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    Where are you at? We have a very good eye specialist clinic in Naperville Illinois that has worked with horses at my barn. They are very good and do a great job with pain management as well.
     
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  8. Compadre

    Compadre Senior Member

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    I would let them take the eye. It's pretty badly damaged, and sometimes having an eye with extremely poor vision is worse on the horse than just having one eye. They see scary shadows on that side instead of just relying on the other eye.

    I've handled a horse with only one eye, she wasn't spooky on that side at all, and it didn't affect her at all out in the pasture. She was great on trail rides too, only difference was letting her **** her head to the off side occasionally to get a better look at something. The hollow on her face was not very prominent (I believe they become less so over time) and when she was grazing out in the herd I didn't even notice until someone pointed it out.
     
  9. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    I have personally seen (and against my believe that it could be saved) a vet put a drain in the eye that had been punctured by a fence. It had to have a drain, meds pushed through 3x a day and meticulous care. But, eye and vision was saved. It depends on the injury and the vet. Good luck.
     
  10. Compadre

    Compadre Senior Member

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    I could see that if it was a scleral injury, in that case there's no injury to the "vision" part of the eyeball, just the structural stability and the sterility of the internal eye. But I can't see (what appears from the pictures to be) a corneal injury like that recovering without pretty drastic vision damage.
     

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