Eye Inflammation? (Please help me identify it)

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Jo C., Jul 23, 2018.

  1. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    "Why should I listen to you?"

    Because some random unknown person on the internet does in this case, seem like a much better resource for this, than your farrier.

    In my experience, there is a group of farriers who just aren't real good at being vets. That would be - all farriers. They are not trained to look into the eye and seek out signs of squamous cell cancer. Or cataracts. Or internal cancer.

    That's why I don't ask my farrier to diagnose my horse's medical problems. That's also why most farriers usually refuse to give medical advice. Of any type.

    For example my farrier won't diagnose horses' medical conditions. Ever. No matter who asks him. In fact he works with an excellent lameness vet and he doesn't even profess to have x-ray vision and be able to see inside a horse's foot!


    After many years and seeing a great deal of this 'it's just flies' or 'he's faking lameness to get out of work' or 'yeah he's got diarrhea but it's no big deal, just give him cider vinegar,' I've designated a group that I call 'Everyone Says.'

    I've found that 'Everyone Says' tend to assume that everything is 'no big deal' and in fact, they are pretty dang wrong a lot of the time.

     
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  2. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    And to add to what's already posted above: Rule for horse eye problems: “Anything to do with the eyes, you IMMEDIATELY call a Vet.“ Sight is precious. If your eye looked like that you'd be, as soon as you saw it, on the phone to the eye Dr's office, but, hey, it's the horse and my FARRIER ( who knows nothing at all about veterinary medicine,) says it's flies.

    If you refuse treatment or refuse to get a Vet for an eye issue, expect to be judged.

    No, flies make eyes water and CAN make the third eyelid poke out. Flies don't make rumply gross redish growths in the bottom eyelid. This is clearly neither of those. As has been stated, a simple google search will show you multiple photos of eye cancer in horses.

    Heck, Dr. Pol just had an episode of a horse with eye cancer on his show a couple weeks ago. Looked like this. He sedated the horse and removed it.

    Save money for horse medical expenses. They are living creatures who feel pain. They deserve medical treatment the same as you do.

    And beginner's common mistake: “Believing that ANYONE with more experience than they have knows what they are speaking of.“ No, there are people who have had horses all their lives and don't know much. Your farrier knows very little about eye issues.
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2018
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  3. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    In getting 'as much information as possible from different sources" you are delaying the treatment the horse actually needs.

    I am sorry you are upset, but I'm more concerned about the horse's welfare than your feelings at this point. And you seem far more interested in defending yourself than calling the vet out.

    Suggestion: pick up the phone. Call the vet. Tell him or her that you feel the horse has an urgent problem and needs to be seen right away, it looks like a lumpy growth on the inside of the lower eyelid. If that vet can't come out immediately, call another. If no vet can come out immediately either look for an eye specialist or haul your horse into a larger clinic.

    The 'different sources' - the internet, your farrier - are not who you should be talking to. This is not the right approach with this sort of problem.

    If this growth was in your eye, and you had this level of pain, you would be rushing to the doctor.

    You 'gather different sources of information' when you're considering what saddle pad color you prefer. When a horse's eye has a big gob like this in it, you call a vet immediately.

    The vet should be out there examining that horse's eye. At this point, you're looking at a delay of a week at least, and that could be disastrous with an eye problem.

    I guarantee you that delay could lead to the entire eye being destroyed - the cancer rubs on the cornea of the eye and causes the animal to rub his eye frantically to try to get rid of the pain and that causes severe injury to the cornea that goes through the basal membrane, and that cannot be treated. You do not want to pay for an extraction of an eye. I just did. It was not fun.

     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2018
  4. reicheru

    reicheru Senior Member

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    That can quite easily turn into this:
    Screenshot_20180727-114502.png
    Just like it did with my old man. Previous owners neglected to have it looked at and my vet bought him 5 more comfortable years before I had him put down. I wish I knew where those pictures were. I would rather have my vet tell me something is no big deal than to have a real crisis on my hands.
     
  5. endurgirl

    endurgirl Senior Member

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    You should have called the vet by Tuesday at least, and if it's NOT squamous cell carcinoma, then you've spent maybe a hundred bucks.

    Several of us have had horses who have had eye issues, and squamous cell carcinoma more specifically (myself included). Do your horse a favor and call the vet today, send him a picture at least.
     
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  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    criminy.

     
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  7. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I'd also like to comment briefly (for me, anyway) on buying horses and then finding out they have a serious, and perhaps very longstanding medical issue that is going to cost you a bundle to deal with.

    The best way to avoid this situation is to have a veterinarian examine the horse before you commit to buying the horse. This means paying for a prepurchase exam.

    I know people who go without a prepurchase exam when buying, but this path does not work well for novices. Some old timer may not get 'bit' too often, but frankly I've seen that even they can wind up with an unrideable horse with a big expensive problem. Even extremely experienced people get 'took.'

    Most people, even very experienced horse folk, don't buy more than one or two dozen or so horses in an entire lifetime. And they buy infrequently. So they never really get 'in practice' and there are always new medical issues being discovered and new ways to cover them up (with new drugs...), so it's very hard to 'keep up.'

    The purpose of the prepurchase exam(PPE) is to make sure the horse is able to do the job you have in mind. Perhaps that's just go for some easy trail rides in summer, or perhaps it's the Olympics in show jumping. Or something in between. In any case, a veterinarian needs to examine the horse in detail.

    If you are a novice and cannot afford to have the vet examine the horse before you buy, can you afford to buy and keep a horse? The PPE costs about as much as annual vaccinations, it costs less than an emergency call for an injury. So the question is legit: if a PPE is too expensive, can you afford ongoing vet care once you have the horse? Veterinary care is expensive and horses do get sick, get injured or wind up with chronic conditions that need continued treatment.

    To perform almost any type of work or sport, a horse needs to be able to see. He needs to be able to breathe, his heart needs to be sufficiently disease free to allow for the given tasks, and his digestion has to work. Many times, people focus only on legs, feet and lameness. But in fact, breathing, vision and heart and lungs are where many horses have problems.

    In fact, many horses are sold due to problems with heart, vision, digestion, breathing.

    Here are some tips of when you should suspect an eye problem in a horse for sale:
    1. The horse tosses his head, lifts his head into odd positions frequently, or has 'quirks' like spooking a lot or 'eyeing' things suspiciously - when he's loose in the pasture as well as when he's handled or ridden or longed
    2. There is a flow of tears from one or both eyes. It's not always 'because of flies'.
    3. The eye is frequently injured, rubbed or bumped
    4. One or both eyes seem to be of an abnormal shape or size, sunken or protruding.
    5. The surface of the eye (cornea) seems to have an abnormal blueish haze
    6. The horse shows signs of repeated injuries to his muzzle/nostrils from bumping into things
    7. The horse repeatedly bumps into an electric fence in a very familiar area
    8. You witness the horse bumping into objects when he is in a very familiar area and should know where things are
    Keep in mind that there may be no signs of vision problems while the horse is in a familiar area. Horses can and do navigate familiar areas very successfully, much of the time, despite vision loss. You may only notice a problem when the horse is given an unfamiliar task in an unfamiliar area.

    Years ago my friend had a completely blind Appaloosa yearling. When she brought the horse to a new barn, she turned the horse out in the pasture. The horse ran in a panic, straight for the ravine and crashed into the creek and lay on her back in the creek, neighing frantically. I think the owner had no idea the horse was blind because she had navigated around fine at the old barn.

    So the seller may not even know that the horse has a vision problem. But you can guarantee that SOME sellers are very, very much aware that the horse has a vision problem and they will make up some bs story about the symptoms and basically, lie like a rug to you.
     

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