Extreme heat, how do you get some relief to your horse?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by RG NIGHT HEIR, Jul 6, 2018.

  1. RG NIGHT HEIR

    RG NIGHT HEIR Senior Member

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    117 degrees at the horses ranch today. All horses just hanging out in the shade.
    I just wet Chips mane ,his chest and between his back legs.
    Brand mash with electrolytes and some hand walking, since he is off the pasture for a while.
    What do you all do for your horse to get some relief?
    Fires are burning around San Diego, too.
     

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  2. Faster Horses

    Faster Horses Senior Member

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    Wow!

    We had about 100 with a heat index of 110 last week. That was enough for me.

    Shade, fans, and watermelon chunks in the water tank.
     
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  3. RG NIGHT HEIR

    RG NIGHT HEIR Senior Member

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    Ah,of course apples or water melon in the water. Chip is very suspicious if it's not an apple or carrot, that's all he likes and mints of course.
     
  4. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    When you look and go "omg" the temperature and then realize that it's the time, not the heat wave.
    Dhc_9sIVAAAPou4.jpeg

    Pulled this from Twitter
     
  5. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    Ugh, that's hideous. Electrolytes, shade, make sure their water is clean and fresh, and hope for a breeze. I hope the fires get under control soon - my biggest fear. :(
     
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  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Soaked hay to get more water into them and to reduce dust.

    I add about a half pound of alfalfa hay, also soaked, per day.

    Hang a couple salt blocks around of different types so they keep interested in their salt.

    Hang two water buckets, and keep them scrubbed out daily and dump and fill them frequently. Monitor how much water they are drinking.

    On very hot days they get hosed off multiple times, without scraping the water off(if it's extremely hot each time I rinse them, I wet and scrape off repeatedly each time I rinse). If it's extremely hot I'll rinse them off several times, starting around noon. When I have to go back to work, I plan to get them some misting fans so they can get wet down while I'm gone in afternoon.

    My building has a very high ceiling with a ridge vent, cross ventilation and fans, the stalls are at the south end of the barn where the air current normally blows from SW to NE - there's an east door and windows all along the east wall of the building so the air can now only flow in but also out, which I guess is really important. If I had it to do over the windows in the arena would be larger and there'd be more of them.

    There are large south and west doors(west doors are 20 feet wide) to let that air flow through the barn. So it often will stay very comfortable in their stalls. And they want to stay in their stalls when it's really hot. Generally the stall doors, facing south, also stay open in hot weather unless the flies are very bad.

    I plan to put screening or burlap on the stall doors, and teach them to go in and out through it. I think that will keep horse flies out of the barn. We also use fly predators, automatic sprayers, Fly Spot (applied every two weeks), fly traps, and a biting fly trap I made (it's very large and really nifty).

    Stalls are built with narrow horizontal slats between the boards so there is air flow. The stall walls are relatively low, with stall bars (I'd like the stall bars to be closer together, I think if they are lower they need to be close together and very unbendable bars, to be safe).
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2018
  7. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    I wash mine with cold water, squeegee off, then alcohol brace. Lots of water and add electrolytes to feed.
     
  8. RG NIGHT HEIR

    RG NIGHT HEIR Senior Member

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    Ha,I wish it was 1:17pm ...
     
  9. Mcdreamer

    Mcdreamer Senior Member

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    I soak the hay and offer alfalfa mashes with electrolytes and probiotics in it. Keep the water clean and appealing. Monitor gum color and skin pinch test regularly. If the horse gets grain I soak their grain.
     
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  10. foxtrot

    foxtrot Senior Member

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    I feel very fortunate to have a heavily shaded area the horses spend their time in. It's been brutally hot but I haven't noticed the horses even getting sweated up anywhere but under their manes.

    But I did switch to smaller buckets which I refill with fresh cold water 3 times a day. They LOVE the tiny buckets of cold water. I've noticed a huge increase in the amount they drink if it's cold versus the standard big bucket with hot water.

    They have free choice loose mineral as well as himalayan salt licks.

    But IMO the biggest thing is shade, either natural or manmade. I can't imagine keeping mine in the sun.

    Shady daytime paddock is their favorite spot to hang out. The dry lot starts shady and then gets full sun later in the day so they retreat here.

    [​IMG]
     
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