Explosive Horse

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by Nitro17, May 15, 2017.

  1. D_BaldStockings

    D_BaldStockings Senior Member

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    Have you ever gotten on this horse without a saddle?
    I am not suggesting this, only wondered if the saddle is your problem or your riding is messing the horse's mind.

    Only you can handle this horse? is a huge red flag that the drama here between you and the horse is due to poor, inconsistent, or inept handling on the ground and under saddle, sorry.

    Until your horse is calm, listening to you and not annoyed by your tack or riding? You won't be teaching him anything worthwhile and he has a lot to learn - or you do.

    The advice to get help from a trainer is your best bet. I don't think either one of you needs to revisit riding at this juncture.

    If you aren't using a helmet, do. There are so many ways to get killed by horses and this is a very quick and reliable fix for one of them; even on the ground.
     
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  2. D_BaldStockings

    D_BaldStockings Senior Member

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    "...About 40 minutes into the ride, I asked for the lope. He went crazy, just out of the blue. He reared straight up! I fell off and hit my head on my stirrup on the way down. He reared 5 more times and almost tangled himself in the fencing. I caught him, walked him out to calm down. Then lounged him and called it a day. I know i Probally should've got back on, but for my own safety and possible head injury i didn't. I have no idea what is causing this dangerous habit and its interfering with our training schedule. He was supposed to be my barrel prospect."

    Rearing after you have dismounted is not lack of respect: that is either serious pain from the saddle or possibly in his mouth - I have no idea what bitting set up or other mess is going on.

    The fact that you have no idea what is causing this is simply that you don't know what you don't know - and you need expert eyes on you to get this sorted: if you can.

    As a barrel prospect, you have either fried his brain or caused him so much pain that you now have a horse that would need to be restarted walking the pattern once his pain and fear issues are relieved and he is good just as a riding horse w-t-c, whoa, basic turns, backing, etc..
    He has no confidence in his training at all now.

    It isn't about trust or respect at all.
     
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  3. cowgirl-tuff

    cowgirl-tuff Senior Member

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    Yes. Lets speak to her with solid advice and common courtesy instead of rushing her and shoving insults and directions down her throat. You can convey how dangerous this situation is in adult manner. But if that's too much effort for you, carry on.
     
  4. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    All I've got to add is that RelaxMax is a demolition expert who diffuses bombs in case you didn't know that.

    I think it's your tack, probably saddle and needs to be addressed immediately before you get a habit ingrained.

    Post photos of him saddled and we can give you an idea on that.
     
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  5. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    But if it's the ill fitting saddle, getting the rider off should have given him instant relief, shouldn't it?
     
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  6. Compadre

    Compadre Senior Member

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    Not necessarily, if it is digging in someplace, then ditching the rider might still not totally fix it.
     
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  7. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    So much depends on what exactly isn't fitting. Bella did the same early on when I unknowingly rode her in a saddle that dug into the muscle on either side of her withers. The horse in the OP is girthy or at least apprehensive and reactive upon mounting. So it seems likely that just having the girth tight is causing pain.

    It took several months for B to trust the saddle after I'd had a new one fitted and had her adjusted. I rode longer than I should have because I didn't make the connection. She was young and flighty and I put it down to that. I have never made the same mistake since and feel horrible about what I put her through.
     
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  8. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    But then the problem would already start with saddling, not mounting the horse.
     
  9. Mirage

    Mirage Senior Member

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    Check your saddle. Run your hand all over the fleece underneath to check for nails, screws, or anything else sticking out.
    Check if your saddle fits. If you can't tell, take proper pictures and post them here.
    Make sure your saddle is sitting where it belongs. A lot of people put their saddles too far forward. Again, if you can't tell, take proper pictures and post them.

    Check teeth.
    My fiance got a horse in for training two months ago that reared like you wouldn't believe. Owner was longing him in the round pen for 45 minutes before riding. Then he would get on and the horse would explode.
    Fiance round penned him for 5 minutes and decided horse was calm enough to get on. Found the problem as soon as he went to put the bridle on. Wolf teeth on either side were in the perfect spot where the bit would hit them no matter what.
    By the end of the first week we were both riding this horse with a nylon halter. He reared a lot at first, then realized we weren't hurting him and it became less.
    Owner finally pulled wolf teeth and is riding him in a bit. Horse is now doing great and doesn't need to be round penned.

    What bit are you using? If it's more than just a snaffle, he may not be trained enough to use the bit, or your too heavy handed.

    Check for ulcers.
    Is he not eating as much? Getting grumpy when saddling? Hates leg pressure?

    If all the above are good, have a vet look at him again. Have a chiro look at him.

    If he comes back clean, have a trainer evaluate what's going on so see if the problem is him or you or both and go from there.

    While rearing can look cool and fun in movies, it's not something to play with. He's either in pain and is screaming at you, and the next step up is to hurt you to get his point across.
    He's not trained and is confused.
    Or he's a snot and needs to be corrected.
    None of which you can fix if you think round penning for almost an hour is the solution. And I'm not trying to be mean.
     
  10. AmyK

    AmyK Senior Member

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    I think this is a terrible suggestion for the OP. maybe not for someone with the proper experience but the OP does not seem to have that. @Nitro17 please get a competent trainer involved. I've been overhorsed before with a problem horse, I know it is NO fun, but for the two of you to even have a chance you need a good trainer helping you.
     

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