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Excercises, and proper use of a Surcingle.....

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by Miss Robn Time, Apr 19, 2005.

  1. Miss Robn Time

    Miss Robn Time Senior Member

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    i finally bought a surcingle to aid in Robn's "re-training" especially since she is having a hard time learning to accept contact, and move in a proper frame, yes it takes LOTS of time, and plenty of muscle for a horse to carry itself correctly, and i work with her almost EVERYDAY on gaining muscle, she is either lunged for 10 to 15 mins, or ridden for an hour or more, after she is ridden for quite sometime she'll start to put her head lower, and more correct, but she'll only do it for maybe half of a circle, maybe longer depending on the day, if you stop her troting, and start to walk for a bit, or try a canter, she goes right back into the giraffe stance, and wants nothing to do with comming back down to where her head should be......i'm sorry that was long

    now the real question, what excercises should i do with the surcingle to help her, learn to carry her head where its supposed to be, and use her back end correctly....if you have pictures, i'd REALLY appreciate it, i'm a visual learner.....

    by the way, this is the surcingle i purchased.....
    http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp?pn=X1%2D30139
     
  2. Miss Robn Time

    Miss Robn Time Senior Member

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    doesn't any one have anything to say:(
     
  3. Avishay

    Avishay Banned

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    Basically, there are two ways you can use the surcingle. First, you can use it with sidereins while lunging, and secondly, you can use it to do ground driving/long-lining. I would start out lunging with loose sidereins, and have them on the lowest rings. Use the lunge whip to push her forward into the contact and do lots of transitions. Gradually tighten the side reins as she learns to accept the contact.

    Use the ground driving application, run your lines through the surcingle rings at whatever level you want. Start out using the arena fence as a guide, and stand well back and to the inside, but keep enough even contact on the lines so that she will travel straight along the fence. I suggest you wear gloves btw, as she may pull at first while she gets used to it. Keep steady contact and ask her to move forward by touching her hip with the whip and kissing. Work on keeping her straight, at first, then gradually start asking for turns and make circles to change direction. When you both get more confident. begin to ask her to walk straight across the arena diagonal, and introduce serpentines. What you're trying to do with the ground driving is to get her moving into your contact without the distractions of balancing with a rider or dealing with leg/seat aids.
     
  4. Miss Robn Time

    Miss Robn Time Senior Member

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    Thanks Sam! any one else?
     
  5. CountryBoy

    CountryBoy Senior Member+

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    Ummm, don't use them, don't like them.
     
  6. love eagle

    love eagle Full Member

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    I bought this training system of Ebay called the Pessoa, which is a series of ropes and pulleys, and i find it wonderful for working horses in the correct outline. First it teaches them to work long and low and really stretch out, then you can move on to the more classical 'on the bit' position.

    Its great because unlike side reins, it doesnt simply 'pull' the horses head into position. Because the system connects to behind the hindquarters then to the lunge roller then to the mouth, the horse learns to actively use his hindquarters and work in the correct rounded frame. The pressure on his mouth is controlled by pulleys, so the rounder he works and the more he brings his quarters beneath him, the less pressure there is.

    Ive found it works excellent for my horse, and is great for building a topline. I would never go back to using side reins or a chambon or anything similar now that i have the Pessoa. Its in local stores near me now, i dont think its too hard to find. It only cost me $90 AU on Ebay including a roller. I suggest taking a look.

    http://www.summerpastures.co.uk/Summer Pastures/Catalogue/Lungeware/pessoa_training_system.htm

    Theres a picture for you - it looks more complicated than it really is!
     
  7. Avishay

    Avishay Banned

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    LoveEagle - I've seen that system before, and similar ones as well, but I have to say that I don't care for them. I'm not a fan of gadgets, even basic ones like martingales, and the lunging harness you showed is definately a gadget - it puts pressure on the horse in places and in ways that a rider never will, and so while it worked for your horse, I think it's unrealistic to expect the majority of horses to make the connection from all those different pressure points and transfer that to your undersaddle aids. Besides, with training rigs, you conform the horse to the frame you'd like, not giving him any chance to learn on his own.

    Now, please don't think I'm being hypocritical about the gadget thing because I suggested the use of sidereins. sidereins are my one and only gadget exception, because when used correctly they do nothing but mimic the "perfect hands" of a rider. Also, used correctly, they are not restrictive and do not force the horse to accept contact because properly adjusted they do not pull the horse's head down or in, but rather give him the option to seek steady contact and to set a limit for how far he should reach.
     

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