Doesn't like men

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by palogal, Dec 16, 2017.

  1. slc

    slc Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    21,118
    Likes Received:
    12,713
    Husband probably reminds horse of someone who roughed horse up. It definitely happens.

    Years ago a 'breaker' who had worked with one of the horses at a barn where I was, showed up. That horse took one look out the front of her stall and tried to climb the back wall of her stall to get away from him. And I've heard lots of other accounts of a similar nature over the years. They remember how people smell and look.
     
    Alsosusieq2 likes this.
  2. foxtrot

    foxtrot Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2013
    Messages:
    2,187
    Likes Received:
    7,862
    This thread makes me wonder, is it more common for horses to dislike men than for them to dislike women? I have one that does way better with men, even inexperienced men, than he does with women. It took me forever to get to the point where I could walk up to him in the field but then male relatives who know nothing about horses can walk up to him with no issues. It's bizarre. His previous owners were all men, and I finally noticed if I'm more firm and business-minded with him that he's much happier than if I spend forever fussing over him and scratching him and trying to get him to relax.
     
  3. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Messages:
    34,407
    Likes Received:
    66,488
    Millie insulted a down-the-street neighbor, big time. Neighbor came into the field with me to see the Mils. She's walking right to us until she sees the neighbor, then , without missing a beat, adjusts her path and walks away. Neighbor says: “ Wow~!! That was rude~!! :eek:

    :rofl: That's how she is. First impression, she either likes ya or she doesn't~!! (Most people she likes. In ten years I can only count two or three people she would not approach. One was my X-Farrier.)
    She did the same to my Donkey Eartha. Not even gonna smell ya, just no~!!
     
  4. Binca

    Binca Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2014
    Messages:
    1,692
    Likes Received:
    2,764
    My TB King is better with men. He is still a gentleman with women and doesn't put a hoof wrong, but he seems to give that little extra something to men. I think he spent his entire race career (he raced until he was 9) with men.

    Ciarra on the other hand. I often get asked "has she had a bad experience with a male?". There has been nothing long term, but there have been a couple of one offs with different men, and I do wonder about the guy who owned the stables I used to be at. She will accept men handling her but it takes her a while to warm up to them and let them halter her, and apart from my husband she will still be a bit stand-offish with men even if she does let them handle her. She is very picky with men, and won't let anyone too cocky/arrogant near her. You need to approach her with a confident attitude, but if you walk up with a halter thinking you are the best thing that ever happened to the horse world you won't get near her.
     
  5. brl_rcr72

    brl_rcr72 Full Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2017
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    60
    I had a gelding that HATED only tall men. This horse was a total dope on a rope for the most part, but if a tall guy came in he would cower in the back of his stall wouldn't even take a carrot, or eat grain from one. He was fine with short guys tho. Even the vet who was sticking him with needles he didn't care. So weird. And he was fine with tall women.
     
  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    21,118
    Likes Received:
    12,713
    There's a lot of evidence that horses have extremely good memories for voices, gestures and appearance of individual people, so it's not at all a stretch to believe a horse would develop a fear of tall men.

    There's some research on elephants that indicates they learn all the gestures, behaviors and postures of illegal poachers, even the words they use and weapons they carry, and that they clear out of poached areas very quickly. And that they ignore people who do not act like poachers.

    Animals put together some amazing things. I went to a 'Buddhist Ranch' up in northern Michigan a day or two before hunting season started and saw a huge herd of deer heading toward the ranch, I've never seen so many deer together, running through the woods like that. The folks at Buddhist ranch told me in a few hours all their property would be absolutely covered with deer, laying butt to butt everywhere. And the deer would 'camp out' there until the hunting season was over. AND they show no fear of the Buddhist residents and guests.

    Interestingly, my neighbor walked up the path to the barn holding a gun, and Wuss Horse took one look at him and wheeled and ran. Never saw a gun before, never heard one fired close enough to associate the loud noise with a gun, nothing.
     
  7. Peeperpuppy

    Peeperpuppy Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2017
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    5
    Grandpa & I used to work with a lot of problem horses. I agree with many others, your husband (something about him) reminds the horse of someone he didn't want any part of spending time with. In your husband's boots, I'd set out to blow the horse's mind in a polite & gentle way. The first part is the hardest. He's going to have to go to the round pen & work with the horse until he can catch him but once he does... once the horse allows him to put the halter on he needs to say, "Okay, great thanks...." & let him go. Me, I'd give the horse a little treat: a chunk of carrot or apple or even a sugar cube (but this needs to be a treat the horse only gets from your husband). The horse sees this & now he's puzzled. His mind says, "I don't like that guy, he's just like that last jerk who did x,y,z to me but...but...BUT just when I have to put up with him he walks away?"

    This will have to happens several times. To the point Husband asks the horse to be caught, the horse finally grows to allow this because he's learning nothing bad will happen when THIS guy catches him. He must have the horse stay just long enough to see the difference BUT he must walk away before he horse gets the idea that he wants to walk away. So the horse is left there wondering what the heck? Once that happens the horse will get curious. He can't help it. He may never like or be comfortable with your husband but he will learn that he can tolerate. One of these days he might even forget how much he doesn't like guys & almost accidentally forget himself & like your husband :)

    I've had horses that I've worked with that literally they let me touch a part of them & I walk away. So my contact is 3-5 seconds. But it's a building block. Next time you hope for more but always walk away before the horse gets the idea to walk away. It's the key to the success of the whole plan.

    I hope this helps.
     
  8. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Messages:
    34,407
    Likes Received:
    66,488
    @slc her last post is spot on. Where I was, on my now deceased hubby's farm, we were just West of a huge hunting lodge, across the street diagonally from the property was another hunting area. Thousands of acres to hunt on. Behind me was another, almost full square of hunting land.

    The deer came down the road, between the two hunt clubs, ducked into the back of our place and bedded down in the ancient sinkhole. You could not put a foot down without stepping on a deer track. Heck, multiple deer tracks, one next to the other, everywhere down there.
    You could see the rubs and scrapes where the bucks left their marks, the trails they used, and their bedding area.

    Right after dark they'd come up out of the suinkhiole. Millie would start blowing. I could shine a light out there and would count thirty to forty in a group, one after the other, jumping the fence at the crest of the sink hole. They rub the trees and graze in the West pasture at night. All the trees were rubbed. You could tell how big of a buck it was by how high, and what width tree trunk, the rub was on.
    They were safe with me. I had a doe bringing her fawn to the barn to eat off a round bale. Little hole at the bottom of the RB where the young one fed and larger one towards the top. Deer prints all around. A young doe in my yard, right behind the trailer, eating choke cherries, broad daylight, for the whole afternoon. They know where it's safe and where it's not.

    Animals learn sequences of events. If what you are doing, how you are presenting yourself to the animal, disturbs it.....CHANGE THAT.
     
    Larkspade, ginster, Binca and 2 others like this.
  9. StarPattern

    StarPattern Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    Messages:
    2,170
    Likes Received:
    3,424
    I brought my very non-horsey fiance to the barn once. His job was to hold my quiet Standardbred mare for her hoof trimming while I handled my hot-headed Quarter Horse. Now, my Standardbred can be aloof and she doesn't like many people. It takes her a while to warm up to people. So I figured she'd stand quietly for her trim and stay out of his space.

    All of a sudden, I hear this very un-fiance-like noise and "uhm... is this normal? Babe? Babe? Help."

    Vanna decided the best thing she could do in that moment was sidle up to him so he was stuck in a corner and lick him from neck to ear. He looked as terrified as a combat-ready soldier could and like the nice horse girl I am, I laughed.

    They're friends now. She figured out he likes beer while at the barn, and as an ex-racer... she has a bit of a taste for beer.
     
  10. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Messages:
    34,407
    Likes Received:
    66,488
    He must've smelled like a beer~!! :rofl:
     

Share This Page