Dangerous Studs and Improper Fences #2

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by QuarterHorseMomma, Dec 18, 2016.

  1. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    My fences are six feet high, 3 1X6 inch planks and electrobraid wire, five strands, 4 hot and one is serving as a ground and I have ground rods and this spring am adding a lightning arrestor. The neighbor's llama is no longer able to breed my mare. I'm happy about that.

    I figured out the one neighbor just was never going to get a decent fence. That's just how some people are.
     
  2. AprilBride2012

    AprilBride2012 Senior Member

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    OP, in a perfect world, you wouldn't have to do jack squat to your fences. Unfortunately, as your neighbor is proving, this isn't a perfect world!

    Hope you got a goooooooood lawyer. Squeeze your neighbor tight!
     
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  3. equinitis

    equinitis Senior Member

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    If the horse is jumping the fence, it won't matter how hot it is. It is not illegal to connect 110 to a fence though, just saying. Lots of folks do it around here so it does not pulse like a portable fence charger will.

    Personally, I'd be spending the money you are spending on a second fence, certified letters and vet bills on one good fence to protect my mare. It is her responsibility to keep her stallion contained but she has already proven she doesn't care and you are not home all day to make sure he stays away from your mare.

    Good fences do make goo neighbors for sure. Again, what a mess you are having to deal with.
     
  4. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    The legality of an electric fence varies dependent upon the county or city.
    Electric Fence Laws
     
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  5. PyroTekNik333

    PyroTekNik333 Senior Member

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    I can understand it grinds your gears to have to fence her horses out when the law in your area requires the opposite.

    But the way I see it, court might get you damages paid back, if you can get her to actually pay, you will still be left with an injured horse or worse?

    Yes, as stupid as it is I would do whatever I needed to in order to prevent my horses from getting hurt.
    If that means I build fort Knox, well, there ya go.
    It's silly imo to not build a fence that can keep the studs out based on principle. You very well could end up with a dead horse, would that make up for standing your ground on what is right? It doesn't sound like this lady is going to do a darn thing and I'd be pleasantly surprised if Leo's could/would either.
    Sometimes people just suck and you have to do what you have to do.
     
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  6. MissApril

    MissApril Senior Member

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    I did too! :)
     
  7. equinitis

    equinitis Senior Member

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    State, county, city for sure.
     
  8. Caitlin Popplewell

    Caitlin Popplewell Registered

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    I have two studs on my property, and we have neighboring mares on either side of us, as well as boarded mares. So I know that the stud owner (like myself) is absolutely liable for anything the stallions do and has the legal (and honestly, the ethical as well) responsibility to keep them safely contained at all times and respond immediately to any problem brought up by someone else about said horses. I hope this ends well for you, good luck and keep us posted!
     

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