Crazy internet advice...

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by reicheru, Feb 9, 2019.

  1. turnnburnlynx

    turnnburnlynx Senior Member

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    And it's not just honey. Its raw, medical grade manuka honey. Dont go slathering honey you put in your tea on a wound, the sugar ins it would cause crazy bacteria
     
  2. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

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    Horse, not human lol
     
  3. turnnburnlynx

    turnnburnlynx Senior Member

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    I saw a good one and it made me laugh -

    For cribbing, put down pop rocks in the area that gets chewed.

    I find this so funny because lynx use to love pop rocks. If I had some he would gobble them up, and when they started popping he would to the flehmen response until they stopped
     
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  4. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    That's what I wanted to know: do they use transmission fluid on their own (human) injuries as well? Since they swear by it...
     
  5. Ziast

    Ziast Senior Member

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    The sugar in honey is part of what makes it antibacterial. The sugar creates a hypertonic environment that dehydrates small organisms like bacteria. There's also peroxide and other enzymes, but it's hypertonic nature is a big part.
     
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  6. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

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    I definitely misread your question. No I have not heard of them using it on themselves. However there are a LOT of common horse wound topicals that I wouldn't use on myself.
     
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  7. JStorry

    JStorry Senior Member

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    I use honey. Local raw unpasteurized honey as per my vet, and saline. Lots of saline, used in a garden sprayer for debriding. I've seen some nasty wounds heal with little scarring using that protocol from my vet.

    A lot of people here use a mixture made up by a local with the main ingredient being turpentine. On open wounds particularly, and that one one bugs me.

    I've used plenty of horse products on myself, and would not hesitate to do so again. If I wouldn't use it on myself, I'm not using it on my horse.
     
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  8. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

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    Yep. This is why granulated sugar, honey and manuka honey work just fine equally. I actually have manuka honey and its NOT CHEAP and doesn't taste good IMO. I think my little 8 oz jar was 35$.

    We used sugar on a dog that was in hospital for over a month. He was a working Border Collie that accidentally got dragged behind a pickup. He had deep wounds on every part of his body covering at least 50% in total. Sugar wraps were an every day thing with him. SO MUCH SUGAR. He eventually healed enough to go home and we never had any issues with his recovery.
     
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  9. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    Poor doggie...
     
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  10. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Oh yeah, for sure. That's not backwoods IMO, heck, I think it's been used since ancient Egypt.
     

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