Cowhocked yearling?? posted picts!

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Carinosa, Oct 6, 2007.

  1. Carinosa

    Carinosa Full Member

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    I have a yearling MFT filly. She lost a lot of weight over the summer despite being well fed. I noticed during that time that she appeared to be cowhocked, is this a common thing for underweight yearlings?? It is gotten some better since I have gotten some weight on her, so I was considering that it could be weight. Or if she is showing signs of it now than will she be like that all her life?? She's a well shaped, pretty horse and I'd like to show her but this could be a problem. Are there any ways to correct this? Any input would be appreciated!
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2007






  2. aprimetradition

    aprimetradition Full Member

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    Do you have a pic you could show us?
     
  3. Bodi

    Bodi Senior Member+

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    It is most likely a permanent thing. However, this may also be a breed characteristic desired trait. They like hocks together in drafts, so who knows. Maybe MFT's, this is common. I've only owned one so I cannot say one way or the other without doing research.
     
  4. Carinosa

    Carinosa Full Member

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    OK, I will try to post a pic tonight, I can't do it right now, have to take a pict and figure out how to do it. I have wondered about that and that is a possibility, but I have not been able to find that out, part of my reason for posting here! Thanks for the replies and I will work on the picture thing!
     
  5. Carinosa

    Carinosa Full Member

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    OK I think I figured it out!:) Sorry it took me so long to post these, but my computer is slow and I didn't have the time to wait for it till now! These arent the greatest picts, she really is prettier than it looks, she also is usually shiny but is growing her winter coat! Please tell me what you think about her hocks and critique her conformation, and don't be afraid to ge honest, I want to know what you think!! thank you so much:)!!![​IMG][​IMG]
     
  6. OzCowgirl

    OzCowgirl Senior Member

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    Aww she is a cutie - she has a nice coat and eye. Her stance is telling. In that photo she is extremely cow-hocked and splay-footed. How is her movement? Usually cow-hocked horses don't stop well and can be a bit clumsy behind in some disciplines. Has she been in work yet? What will you do with her? What discipline?
     
  7. Carinosa

    Carinosa Full Member

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    She is a cutie, lol she's my baby!! I think she has gorgeous eyes but the whole leg thing bothers me! Yes I have been noticing that when she walks that her legs turn out and I asked my neighbor to tell me what she saw when Nosa walks and she said that it looks like she is kinda sorta crossing her legs... idk! She hasn't been 'ridden' but she has had someone on her back like once or twice. I do longe her, and she is very well groundtrained but I don't want to start her off the ground yet! Probably she'll be a trail horse, maybe show, but if the hocks are as bad as I think they are, I can't:(! O definitely western!! lol! It's not like she doesnt have breeding, she has excellent parents and is a registered MFT! I want her to be perfect but I love her no matter what she is:) Is cowhocks permanent?? Sorry I couldn't out better picts, I'm still trying to figure this out LOL!
     
  8. OzCowgirl

    OzCowgirl Senior Member

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    It is a conformation flaw, and it's permanent, but that's not to say that she still can't do everything you want her to do. Horses are amazing in that they can adapt to just about everything. I've got a pigeon-toed mare that I love to death, another one with different shaped hooves on every leg. LOL. I've had splints, sickle hocks, fused hocks, the lot. No horse is perfect.

    Just balance her up on the lunge line, do large circles, don't force her into small circles at her young age. Practice moving the hindquarters over. Do a lot of that, so she learns how to adjust her movement. Keep her front end still and get her to step under herself behind. Then get her to move her shoulders across without moving her hind. All groundwork. You can't do too much groundwork!

    Some corrective trimming may be a good idea as well. Talk to your farrier.
     
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  9. stina3246

    stina3246 Senior Member

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    My Arab colt was VERY cow hocked as a yearling.I don't have a picture showing it but this is him a few months ago. (Please no critiques....I already know all the faults in this picture...LOL) [​IMG]
    He is just over 3 now and they have gotten better but he is still cow hocked. Some of this can be helped with work, when she begins to build muscle they should straighten out some. In some disciplines horses that are slightly cow hocked are desireable because of the way they use thier bodies. I've heard that reiners and barrel horses are good if they are a little cow hocked. Some how it is supposed to help them dig in.
    She is very pretty though.
     
  10. lockedrowell

    lockedrowell Full Member

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    way to go on your aproach to training ie. not ready to move her up fromground work yet. If you can get access to a horse to pony her from it will help to do miles and miles of stright line exercise and althought this wont completely correct the faulty hocks it may cause them to be alittle less noticeable.remember that your horse is going to grow dramatically for the next three years so the more miles you can put on here in a straight line the more you will help her, also keep here barefoot while puting on the miles this can also help just stay off the sharp rocks.
     
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