Cough Supplements?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by horsegal_7032, Dec 9, 2008.

  1. horsegal_7032

    horsegal_7032 Full Member

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    My horse gets a bad dry cough every so often. It's like seasonal allergies. Do you guys know of any good cough supplements that work really well?
    THANKS!
     






  2. Gypsy Rose

    Gypsy Rose Senior Member+

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    First of all, has a vet seen your horse for this cough? Might not be a bad idea. There are many different cough suppressent supplements on the market, as well as some specifically for allergies and bronchitis. Those are usually vet prescribed, though some are sold over the counter.

    I would seriously cnsider consulting your vet on this problem to discover the reason for the cough before I would try any remedies.
     
  3. AllAroundRdr

    AllAroundRdr Senior Member+

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    I use Select's cough syrup. It smells like A-1 Steak Sauce + Menthol.

    Also when I have a horse with a seasonal cough (from weather changes or dust) I soak my hay to get as much dirt/debris out of it and also mix a decent amount of water into my pellets and supplements to soften them up so they aren't as abrasive when being swallowed.

    I also feed AniHist as needed :)
     
  4. iheartcloudnine

    iheartcloudnine Senior Member+

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    Have a vet out, it's not normally just a cough. My pony has allergies and I keep them under control with antihistamine and vet visits to make sure she is not getting any worse. :)
     
  5. GiddyUpScoot

    GiddyUpScoot Senior Member+

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    How often is "every so often"? And what is the extent of the allergic reation? When does the cough typically appear?

    My horse had/has seasonal allergies that vary depending on where we are in the state. That said, my horse also has heaves, of which (the best that I understand) the precursor is typically seasonal allergy symptoms. My horse's heaves were caused by excess ammonia (long story short the person who's barn were were at, and whose horse Scotty was next to, decided after a while that her stalls didn't need to be cleaned because she didn't want to "waste" money on bedding... so they were cleaned when I could clean them and only when I could clean them :/ So we left there running ;)), but due to his allergies, he was more susceptable to developing a resp. ailment than a horse with no history of resp. allergies.

    For these reasons I second weting your hay. You don't need to let it sit and soak, just fully submerge it in water. At the barn where I have Scotty at now, we put his hay into a hay net, dunk it in a mack bucket of water (we let it sit a few min.), flip the hay over to make sure the other side is fully wet (again, let it sit a few min), then we hang it on a nail/hook and let the water drain out of it (back into the bucket). Before that, I put some heay-duty gloves on and dunked it in a stock tank of water :p All you want to do is fully submerge it to rinse off any dust or pollen particles that might be causing your horse to have resp. issues.

    I tried the TriHist (has pseudophederine in it so it's only available through a vet ;)), but it really didn't do anything for my horse that the AniHist doesn't. So rather than spend a ton of $$ on TriHist, I just keep AniHist on hand (if you don't need the expectorant found in AniHist, you can get HistAll, which is only an antihistimine and it's a bit cheaper and more palatable). I have to stick the AniHist to my horse's feed with molasses, though, because it's not very palatable (think of chewing a generic Pseudophed ;)) and he'll sift it out and won't eat some of his grain.

    I have also used Cough Free, which I have had no problems with my horse eating. I had good luck with it when he developed a cough at a friend's barn one winter (we think from the birds that were in the barn)... it didn't take long before his cough was gone! Currently, I've been trying some Air Power to open up his airways (and because someone suggested it as an alternative expectorant), but I haven't noticed any difference in him whether I use it or not.

    I have wanted to get this and give it a try:

    [​IMG]
    http://www.kvvet.com/KVVet/productr.asp?pf%5Fid=42132&gift=False&HSLB=False&mscssid=006E68EC70F7C423D82E46472AB4BBD8

    But it's expensive (~$125 for 90 days) - I might try it out with Scotty at some point... maybe next spring/summer. We'll see. But if it works as well as it sounds, it might be worth it!

    Good luck!
     
  6. horsesR4life

    horsesR4life Senior Member+

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    I have a question: isnt allergies or heaves essentially chronic obstructive pulminary disorder (COPD)?
     
  7. GiddyUpScoot

    GiddyUpScoot Senior Member+

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    Allergies are not COPD. COPD is irreversible, whereas the allergies are. COPD is indeed an inflammatory issues, but, unlike your typical allergies, there is some scarring/thickening of the lung tissue surrounding the alveoli. This leads to an inability to expire air properly. Allergies are thought to be a sign of a horse who may develop heaves because many believe that there is a genetic factor to horses developing the disease and allergies are an outward "warning" sign that the horse has the potential of developing COPD. Not a scientific fact, but a general idea ;)
     






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