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coronet band *weird*

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by CharliesGirl, Jul 17, 2009.

  1. CharliesGirl

    CharliesGirl Full Member

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    Thanks guys for all the ideas. It actually isn't wet now, the last photo was taken in dry conditions. The field isn't bone dry, but his feet are definately NOT wet, soggy, etc. That's why I thought I'd try posting on here again, as it isn't wet but the coronet bands are still swollen.
    Bugsys - I already use Sudocrem (nappy rash cream in UK) every day on his mud fever. I'm unsure about applying it to his actual hooves though?
    Jenny - yeah I've noticed them being white and soggy looking for years. It's only recently I've started noticing that they are SWOLLEN. They are fat and tight, not white and soft. The slightly older posts ARE from the wet weather...the newer from dry.
    IIIBars - it's a hind hoof, so not an overreach. Also the skin is flaking in a similar (but less drastic) way on all hooves in different places. The shoeing...well I do have issues with my new farrier, but that's another story. I'm REALLY unhappy with the job he's done.
    Crayon - so you think it's just from when it was wet? It's weird because it's actually summer here, we had a wet period a couple of weeks ago but it's dry now, and Charlie has lived in muddy conditions (on and off) for years and I've never noticed this before! He ALWAYS gets mud fever though.

    [​IMG]

    This doesn't show how swollen his coronet band is, (as I said, you just can't seem to capture that in a photo!!) but trying to show how swollen the heel bulbs look...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 19, 2015
  2. Dawn

    Dawn Senior Member

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    I can see what you're talking about in the above photo (at the heel). I'm guessing the entire band looks like that? If so, that does seem much more extreme than anything I've personally seen in regards to just being wet. Especially if it's now dry.
     
  3. bugsys22575

    bugsys22575 Senior Member+

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    I do see more of what you are talking about in the heel in that latest pic. And that seems worse than any wet/soggy foot Ive ever seen so Im not quite sure, so I just want to give you a bump for someone else that maybe has seen something like that.
     
  4. RickB.

    RickB. Banned

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    And you d*amn well should be.
     
  5. CharliesGirl

    CharliesGirl Full Member

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    Am glad I've managed at last to show you what I mean! So no ideas then as to a reason? The coronet bands are quite hot as well.
    Rick do you think shoeing could be a factor? He has had no shoes on for two years, till I started riding him again this summer. Our last farrier stopped returning phone calls (a common problem in my area - there is too much work to go around and the good ones are hard to find) so we just started with this new guy. He is the only one we could find who would come out! But I'm not happy, he does them SO quickly and they look a mess, honestly, and I don't know what to do. Is it worth persevering with this guy, and trying to explain what I feel is wrong with the shoeing, or should I go back to the drawing board and try ringing more farriers?? I can post more pictures of the 'job' he did if anyone wants to see them.
     
  6. RickB.

    RickB. Banned

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    The earlier wet conditions and the mud fever may be causing some dermatitis,. I suggest you closely clip the hair up and away from the coronary band and see if that tends to help.

    While it is a remote possibility, and I don't want you to get alarmed, if this condition persists or worsens, then you and your vet need to consider Coronitis.
    Anything is possible, but I think this is rather unlikely. That said, I think you should get those shoes off of him ASAP. IMNTBCHO, they are doing more harm than good.
    Get the shoes off, leave him barefoot for the time being, and find a different hoof care provider.

    Out of curiosity, is this gentleman a member of the WCF(I think all farriers in the UK have to at least be a DWCF or an RSS)? If so, I would contact the WCF and discuss this shoeing with them. They certainly can't be happy with this level of work. If he's not a member/credentialed, then the WCF will want to know about that too.
    I'm all for communication, so if he's willing to come back to your barn and discuss the issues with you, it might be worth while. That said, I would be most interested in hearing his reasoning for the extremely short shoeing, low nailing, unequal clinching, etc.

    You might also ask him who he apprenticed under and then give that farrier a call. I can't imagine that his mentor would be happy with that shoeing either.

    At all times remain calm and business-like. If you appear anything else, you won't stand a chance of actually being listened to.
     

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