Corn stalks as hay filler?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by cowgirlnat, Jun 6, 2008.

  1. cowgirlnat

    cowgirlnat Senior Member+

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    I found an ad for cornstalk bales and was curious if I could use it as a hay filler. We're already at a severe shortage here with dismal predictions for a 2nd cutting. Would it be safe to feed in addition to hay?
     






  2. cowgirlnat

    cowgirlnat Senior Member+

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    What about peanut hay!?
     
  3. 3WishesDun

    3WishesDun Senior Member+

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  4. 3WishesDun

    3WishesDun Senior Member+

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    Peanut hay is a legume like alfalfa. I have never fed it, but I know many people more north of me feed it to their horses.
     
  5. Cyn

    Cyn Senior Member+

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    We call peanut hay here "Florida Alfalfa"... I have never used it... But I know of a lady who lived in Florida that used it... That is where I hear of it...

    She said it was ust like alfalfa but didn't make her horses hot... IDK,
     
  6. sorrell

    sorrell Senior Member+

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    Some cautions on both. The peanut hay tends to have a lot of pesticide residue in it, unless grown organically. It can mold very easily and has high nitrogen levels, so can cause urinary problems. Corn "hay" is in the same boat as wheat straw, only the stalks are extremely coarse. Better suited for cows to chew on for filler that to provide energy and weight gain in horses.
    The oat hay/straw actually seemed to be the best substitute I found last year, mixed with alfalfa cubes, it got us through the worst of the drought.
     
  7. cowgirlnat

    cowgirlnat Senior Member+

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    I've found a few ads for oat straw. Do the horses eat it okay? How much do you feed and how do you mix it?
     
  8. sorrell

    sorrell Senior Member+

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    I was very skeptical of the stuff, but both my horses loved it. I mixed about 2 pounds per horse at first with their grass hay, then fed up to ten pounds per horse per feeding. It has a lot of oats in it as well, so you might have to monitor it. My arab got grossly fat off it and the older horse had a bit of a problem chewing the thicker stems, but it kept both of them satisfied and fairly well padded.
    Just be careful, as the stuff can be a bit moist and can go moldy.
     
  9. 4hooves4me2

    4hooves4me2 Senior Member+

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    I had to feed corn stocks this year-hay was just NOT available.

    I fed beet pulp, alf cubes and oats soaked also with their regualar feed. My horses did well. The stocks kept them mauling on things-and they actually looked great. HOWEVER-I would not put them out with a horse you know has foundered, there is corn left in some of those stocks-not a lot, but it could pose a problem.

    Another GREAT thing with stocks, put the bale where you have a mud problem-it will get rid of the mud-it is awesome. I had mud out in my barnyard almost to my knees at one point-now it is gone, NO mud. I would put the bale out, and do knock off the outside 6 inches or so into the mud. Basically, I knocked off anything I didn't like the looks of, into the mud. The horses really like the stock bales.
     
  10. cowgirlnat

    cowgirlnat Senior Member+

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    What about wheat straw? Any different? I just want filler...they'll still get hay, I'm just trying to find somethign to extend the hay we have now. They get plenty of nutrients, but need long stem fiber and something to keep them preoccupied.
     






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