Corn Oil

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by CarlisleChipper, Feb 8, 2019.

  1. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    I have 2 boarders at my place that are not maintaining weight. Vet came out and floated teeth, did annual vaccines and coggins. I wormed with Equimax about a week or two ago (these are new boarders). The owner is wanting me to do power packs on both of them. The vet wanted me to up their grain (12 8) to 12 quarts a day which is 4 scoops. Owner wants me to pour corn oil on the feed.

    Frankly I'm not comfortable with either of these answers. But they aren't my horses and ultimately it is up to the owner.

    Is corn oil really that bad of an idea to fatten up horses? I know it's high in omega 6 which is proinflammation but what else?
     
  2. Mcdreamer

    Mcdreamer Senior Member

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    How old are the horses? Is cushings a possibility? I've seen a lot of late teen horses that look like crap and can't keep their weight that ended up with a cushings diagnosis.

    IMO there's better options out there than corn oil and upping their feed. But if these aren't your horses I don't see much you can do :-(
     
  3. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    They are 17 and 18 years old, full brothers. Said to be "easy keepers" but are obviously anything but and I don't want poorly looking horses boarded at my property because it reflects on ME.

    I mean, if I have to feed twice the grain then they're going to have to pay more for board.
    They have free choice hay plus pasture. The mare is FAT and doesn't need grain. And of course Henry, but he's my horse so of course he gets the best of everything.
     
  4. Mcdreamer

    Mcdreamer Senior Member

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    What breed? A mare I managed was an easy keeper and then she suddenly just started to deteriorate. Lost a bunch of muscle mass and her topline went to hell in a handbasket. She was 17. Ended up being cushings. Once we started the medication she bounced back really quickly.
    Depending on what these guys breeds are it might be worth it to check.
     
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  5. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    AQHA. What are some symptoms of cushings? Would the vet have noticed that?
    One of the horses also had an adverse reaction to the vet visit. They either don't metabolize sedation quickly or they suffered from an intense immune response from the annual vaccines. One was off his grain and down 5 hours after the visit. Had to have the vet back and they gave banamine. He was acting neurological. He was fine by that night. :faint: "Oh he did that last year too!" ... would have been nice to know.
     
  6. Mcdreamer

    Mcdreamer Senior Member

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    Oof. Sounds like a fun owner to deal with!
    Cushings presents in all kinds of weird mysterious and seemingly un-noticed ways. The standard is poor body condition and a shaggy coat. But I gotta tell ya, out of all the horses I've known who had cushings, not a single one of them had a shaggy coat but they did have a short peach fuzz coat. Both of them were water hogs. One of them had a really dull affect. One of them had frequent abscesses. One was very overweight with a super cresty neck. Two of them were mares that seemed to really not feel good during their heat cycle. Two of them were warmblood, one was an appendix, and one was a Morgan and one was a morab. All of them were below the age of 20.
    I always suspect cushings anytime something seems to be off because it never seems to present itself clearly. Quarter Horses are definitely a breed that has a high rate of cushings. I wouldn't be surprised if vets start going the route of annually checking horses over a certain age for cushings because it seems to be so prevalent. Either way, good luck!
     
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  7. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    What brand and kind of grain are they eating and what is your hay situation ? Always up the hay and forage first, then I would add soaked beet pulp. No to the corn oil. Gross. Do you have access to mccauleys omega bran ? That's what I use for putting weight on one.
     
  8. DocsLglyBlonde

    DocsLglyBlonde Senior Member

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    I second Cushing's. They seem to have strange over reactions to vaccines as well, so that fits too. My mare's symptoms, at 18, were delayed shedding (an otherwise beautiful coat though), mild depression, and mild lethargy. She's always had a nice quality coat, always been an easy keeper, always drinks and urinates normal amounts, but she tested positive with sky high numbers. I have a friend with a mare who has decreased muscle mass, slight increased drinking, and being fussy to no end with her food and has lost weight. I am convinced she has Cushing's and am trying to get her owner to test her. Like McDreamer said, it can present in many different ways, and they are both at the perfect age for it to present.

    Beyond that, I would not use corn oil. It is high Omega 6 and typically very low quality oil. I also agree with Blue, examine their current diet, get them on more forage if possible, then potentially change grains depending on what they're on now. But I'd still look for a root cause, with my first test being for PPID. It's tough since they aren't your horses though.
     
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  9. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    So did they come to you under weight? Maybe the stress of moving to your place is affecting them. Agree they are at the age to start having metabolic issues. My horse lost a lot of weight on grass hay and the wrong grain for him. Hadn't in the past, but it appears his IR made him more sensitive to hays and highly allergic to corn based grains. Started when he was 15, he is now 17. Ulcers though can also make a horse look fat by bloating when actually they are full of inflammation.

    Example of my horse's neck January 21, 2019 due to ulcers. FoxyCrest012319.jpg

    Then February 4 after just five days of treating for ulcers. Note his coat also got darker. I have found the darker he gets, the healthier he is. No diet change and not even exercised, just hand walked Foxycrest0200519.jpg . Finally figured out what started his down fall on January 6, he bruised his right hind foot severely on the metal panel in turnout. Bruises just finally showed up and we treated them once with the PEMF and he finally got nearly sound at the walk.
     
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  10. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    Do what their vet says. Not your horses, not your call. However, if given a month there’s no improvement, you can require they get a second opinion from a different vet. Use the corn oil, again not your animals.
     
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