Cooling methods: evaporation v. conduction

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by endurgirl, Aug 9, 2018.

  1. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    If the water is kept running over the horse, that removes even more heat than scraping.

    But yes, it's a weird agenda.

    Scraping helps when water supply is limited. To some it's a religion, others have s different religion....

     
  2. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    When a horse is totally exhausted or suffering heat exhaustion , from exercise or from not sweating just out in pasture doing basically nothing, they will get wobbly and you really need to stand them in the shade and run cold water from a hose over there head to cool them.
    Get the head first them the body then stay on the head a while.

    We had one that was used as a stud for a year come back and he coldn't train a mile, slow mile, in the heat, at first. He was about to fall, wobbly as heck and his eyes were rolling back. We took him straight to the wash stall and used two hoses, one for his head, one for his body. His temp was 103, but came back to normal in a half hour. You can lose one in this situation if you don't work fast.
     
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  3. lhoward

    lhoward Senior Member

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    I use common sense. Of course science is a good tool, but you have to take into account ALL the variables. The guy dumbs it down to much.

    I am in the South East. It is miserable in the summer. So hot, you can't breath. Combined with almost daily rain and super high humidity. Its truly extreme.

    A horse has a coat. Even a summer coat holds on to water much more so then our mostly hairless skin. When I scrape my horse off I'm always amazed how much water gets held in their coat.

    A horse that has exercised and is "red hot" has a lot of heat coming off of its body. Even when I hose down my horse with cold water, it almost immediately turns very hot next to her skin. Combined with the heat of the day and sometimes the sun shining, that water that is "stuck" on the horse can quickly get super heated. Even when I keep running the hose (and a horse is big, can't spray each part continuously) that water heats up.

    If I didn't scrape, the horse is literally cocooned in super heated water that is held in her coat. Heated by the heat of their body as well as the temperature and sun outside. Evaporation doesn't work well or quick in high humidity.

    It would be akin to wrapping myself in a sopping wet blanket, wet with VERY hot water. On a day when I'm already just about over heated and need to cool down. It would be miserable. Especially if that water only got hotter, before it finally, finally evaporated on this humid hot day.

    A horse that is scraped doesn't have enough water left in their coat to create that "hot wet blanket" effect. Yet, they still have enough moisture against their skin to cool them through evaporation.

    So...to each their own. If I can tell that the water that is stuck in my horses coat is red hot, I scrape it off. Simple common sense to me.
     
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  4. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    You should not be putting cold water on a hot horse.
    Why? Because the pores of the skin are open when the horse is hot and you, buy putting cold water on, shock the pores into retracting.
    Warm water in a bucket with a sponge.

    We have to QUICKLY scrape a horse off; if you don't do it super fast, get done in less than a minute, what happens? The scraper starts to drag over the coat. Why is it dragging? The water has almost all ran off.
     
  5. lhoward

    lhoward Senior Member

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    Pores cannot open and close, retract or push out.

    Simply a physical impossibility. The science behind it can be found online, to many to link to. This whole opening and closing of pores myth is largely due to the many "skin care" products and procedures hype.

    Pores also don't change size, unless one is simply enlarged due to injury and inflammation. They can "appear" smaller if sebum has been removed, but they didn't truly and actually change size.

    If I'm hot, jumping into the pool with cool water cools me faster then getting into a warm shower. The cold water also doesn't shock my pores into doing anything, it may shock me for a second, then it feels wonderful.

    If a horse is clipped or has a super short summer coat, true, the water runs off/drys faster on the coat and there is less to scrape off. But the hair will absolutely hold water, esp. if the humidity is high and not helping the "water to air" exchange. Even a thin sheet of water on the horse can get super hot, and I wouldn't want that on me if I'm already over heated.

    But, like with everything else, to each their own :)
     
  6. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Well that blows sixty years of skincare products away. Didn't know that, I always thought they did.
     
  7. lhoward

    lhoward Senior Member

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    In order to retract, open or close, they would need muscles (much like other round openings we have, i know, tmi..lol)

    What hot water "can" do (steam as well) is softening up the dirt inside of a pore which is usually a mix of oils and dirt. Oils soften up/thin when warmed. So it can be helpful in cleaning a pore, which can make it "appear" smaller.

    However, trying to force sebum out of a pore (or dirt) can cause damage to it, inflammation (pimple) which will then make it appear bigger.

    I'm sure that is more then you wanted to know, LOL
     
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  8. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    For humans, it is a known fact that showering as warm/hot as you can is the best you can do, especially in hot weather. Then, don't dry off but let the water evaporate. You',ll naturally cool down.
    Using cold water gets your heart pumping and your body actively working to warm you up. Which is pretty contraproductive to cooling down.
    This works well for me. I stopped toweling my body dry after a bath or shower. I air dry and feel fresher than I did before.
    I would think it works similar with horses.
    Even with scraping off there should be enough water on a horse's body for this to work.
     
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  9. lhoward

    lhoward Senior Member

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    Humans don't have a dense hair coat that traps water.

    If we did, it would take us far longer to dry naturally. Especially outside in high humidity. Inside of a house the humidity is usually in a comfortable range, which allows for quicker evaporation.
     
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  10. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    i don't question the scraping, I just don't think that cold water is the best to use on a hot horse. It is a shock to the system. Humans can crash when they 're overheated and jump into a cold body of water.
    i would imagine it would be a lot better to use at least tepid water unless you sponge the horse.
     

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