Cooling methods: evaporation v. conduction

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by endurgirl, Aug 9, 2018 at 5:51 AM.

  1. endurgirl

    endurgirl Senior Member

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    I know you've probably all seen this floating around FB already, but wanted some thoughts on it. A few screenshots.

    I think Myth 3 is what is getting everyone up in arms. I know from my endurance days, we scrape the water away as we put more on and scrape it away. Hot water sitting on a horse is going to take forever to evaporate in high humidity and at the vet checks we have limited water, we can't keep pouring until it's cool.

    Screenshot_20180809-084230_Facebook.jpg
    Screenshot_20180809-084514_Facebook.jpg
     
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  2. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

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    I think #3 is wrong, too. Unless someone has scientific proof that leaving water on a horse is better, we have always scraped and rewet until horse has cooled.
     
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  3. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

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    I don't think cold water will damage your horse in any ways, but Idk about leaving water on the horse. I always scrape it off when it's hot. The water that I scrape off is always hot! I wouldn't want to leave it on him.
     
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  4. Ziast

    Ziast Senior Member

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    Fwiw, yesterday after my lesson I hosed off Jules. The water was cold coming out of the hose and we were inside ,so no sun to heat it up . Within the 30 sec or so between wetting and scraping, the water already felt warmer than room temperature . Cold water may cool faster ,but it doesn't stay cool long enough on the body.
     
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  5. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

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    I agree. That water you scrape off a hot horse is pretty hot when you scrape it off.... I wouldn't want to leave it on one!
     
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  6. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    The water doesn't naturally stay on the horse for long enough to GET hot. In a couple minutes, there is hardly enough to scrape.

    You scrape so that you don't get your cooler saturated with water. Simple as that.
     
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  7. Bakkir

    Bakkir Senior Member

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    Sorry, but I don't agree at all with this FB post.

    I Will continue to wet down the key areas (neck/chest/between legs) with cool (not cold) water and scrape off the excess.
     
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  8. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    I've heard to not wet and turn out because the suns rays intensify the heat if you don't scrape. I've always wondered about swimming as mine used to love getting in the water. How'd they ever survive.
     
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  9. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I think a couple of those are wrong, but it seems mostly to be 'anti-scraping', and I am really not at all sure that scrape-or-not-scrape makes that much of a difference.

    I also think that for me in dressage my needs are different from an endurance rider's. The endurance rider has a horse that is thin and narrow and has long slender muscles, and he needs to cool his horse down very rapidly for vet checks.

    I have a horse with more like 'sprinting' muscles - bulky, large, and more body fat on top of the muscle. And a heavier muscled sort of horse than his, even without special conditioning. I have no rush to vet checks. So, I am fine with the way they cool their horses out, and I am also find with how I cool my horse out - lots of water, not ice water, but cool water, and not putting water on the big muscle on the top of the croup or loin, but everywhere else. He gives the horse a big bucket of ice water, I 'water off' - both get the horse rehydrated.
     
  10. PyroTekNik333

    PyroTekNik333 Senior Member

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    I had to find the original on fb because the picture didn't make any sense.
    The guy is a major tool but what the study he referenced is saying is continues application of cold (0-9c) water cools better than a singular application and scraping of 40c water.

    So yeah, if you are trying to cool a heat stressed horse put it under cold running water and stopping to scrape is a waste of time.
    If you, like most horse people, just have access to a bucket or lukewarm tap and you are rinsing sweat off after a ride you would want to scrape off excess water.

    I suppose if you lived in a dry enough climate scraping would not be necessary.
    Anyone who's really lived/worked in humid climate knows that adding more stagnant moisture to the situation just adds to the misery.

    He's just twisting the data to support his anti scraping agenda.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2018 at 9:36 AM
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