Coffin joint inflammation? Or? Pro-Stride treatment?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by RedBranchRun, Mar 6, 2018.

  1. RedBranchRun

    RedBranchRun Full Member

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    I am a bit of a long time lurker, but I am not finding anything exactly similar to my horses situation, so I figured it was time to post and get some feedback.


    This is about my 14 year old gelding I purchased in August of 2017.


    My gelding has some on again and off again lameness in his right front hoof which started early winter.

    From August through November he never took a lame step, and he was worked consistently. He had been in a solid work program prior to that (low level dressage/ranch horse versatility stuff). He was shod in the front, but with the winters we get here, we pulled his shoes in October. Owners said they never had an issue with him barefoot. November, farrier comes out and does a trim.


    A week after November trim, he goes lame suddenly while doing a bit of trot work in the indoor arena. About a grade 1. I treat this with cold hose, poultice, and bute, stall rest. There is no heat or swelling, tendon is cold and tight. I even try soaking the hoof and magic cushion. No improvement. I take him to my vet 6 days later. He takes x-rays, finds nothing. Diagnoses with a possible bad step or sprain. Stall rest another week and see how he does. Horse comes back fully sound within 2 weeks we are slowly back to work again.


    Farrier comes back out early February. 3 days after trim.. guess what? Take horse to indoor, after about 15 minutes walk/trot, he suddenly goes lame again. Grade 1-2. ARG. Of course. I’m an idiot. I have had this farrier for a few years, and was so loyal I was looking past some recent laziness. SO I stall rest again, and bute. I again take the horse up to the vet because I wanted to make sure I didn’t do more damage. Vet spends 2 hours with horse trying to pinpoint what was going on. Take more x-rays, ultrasound the tendon, flexion tests, hoof testers.. and he can’t find anything specific. Decides to try blocking starting in the coffin joint, and see what happens. Vet checks the joint fluid in the coffin joint before injecting, looks great, so vet says he doubts anything is wrong there. HOWEVER, only 5 minutes after the block, horse walks off sound. Vet diagnosis was inflammation around the coffin joint.

    Vet recommends we try a treatment called ProStride, which I understand is a form of IRAP/PRP, instead of doing the steroid coffin joint injections. I have had PRP performed on a different horse with tendon lesions, and we had amazing results. Vet says my gelding can be turned out in our small paddocks for now.

    That was 2 weeks ago. In the meantime, I had a new farrier come out and completely rebalance the horses feet. Within a day he was much more sound. As of this weekend we could not see any lameness. Then yesterday, the ground re-froze (we still have snow and ice here!), and he is again lame. After the Pro-Stride treatment we are thinking of putting the horse back in shoes with pads as well. I am reading up on barefoot trims, but I don’t know if that would help this horse.

    I am very hopeful for this ProStride treatment. Has anyone else had it done?

    I keep wondering if I’m dealing with collateral ligament or DDFT issues too. I do not have the money to get an MRI currently, but I know if this doesn’t work that would probably be the next step.

    Anyone have similar experiences? X-rays from early Feb. attached below.


    Thank you!


    X-ray 1.jpg X-ray 1.jpg x-ray 2.jpg x-ray 3.jpg
     
  2. RG NIGHT HEIR

    RG NIGHT HEIR Senior Member

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    Wow,
    I'm going thru exactly the same with my horse." Navicular Syndrome". Had steroid injection done on his left and his hooves were rebalanced 3 days later. He was so out of whack.
    He is still ouchy hopefully only due to the rebalancing, so on Bute and some light groundwork to keep him moving.
    MRI here in San Diego are either 3600$ at one Clinic due to being the older version where the horse requires general anesthesia, the other clinic is cheaper 2200$ due to the newest standing MRI.
    Horse is sedated only.
    Saving money for it,but meanwhile hopefully he I'll be fine after 2 more weeks off.
    Sorry I feel for you.
    I had major ankle surgery in September 17 and was watching my then trainer for months riding my horse.Finally I was cleared to ride and horse went lame 1 month before being cleared.
     
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  3. RedBranchRun

    RedBranchRun Full Member

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    UGH. That's horrible! Please keep me updated with how your horse is doing? I hope your ankle is okay too!
     
  4. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    Please take hoof pictures like this. Good Hoof Photos - How to take Good Hoof Photos
    Also, I do not generally stall horses for grade 1 or 2 lameness. I think heels and frog may be contracted per your rads, thats why I'd like to see pictures. No amount of medicine is going to work until hooves are properly balanced. I use boots instead of metal shoes and pads. As a matter of fact, I rehabbed my gelding after his hoof surgery without a hospital plate and with boots.
    Also, if you're dealing with ddtf issues, it's likely the heel and frog balance. Pictures ! Be super precise with the camera angles as shown in the link I posted.
     
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  5. RedBranchRun

    RedBranchRun Full Member

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    You got it Bluemoon. I am already at work, but can do this tonight, and post tomorrow morning. What kind of boots do you use? We have easyboots, renegades, and that woof wear medicine boot, looking at soft rides too.
     
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  6. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    I like and use easy boots. I used transitions for my gelding, which I dont think they make anymore. Looking forward to seeing pictures.
     
  7. RG NIGHT HEIR

    RG NIGHT HEIR Senior Member

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    Ankle feels pretty good since my last steroid injection 2-14-18.Started limited work on Monday.
    Horse and I are on the same injection and same site, too lol.
     
  8. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I suggest you find the best leg vet you possibly can and let him/her treat the horse, then follow the vet's rehabilitation plan to the letter. I'd also have a frank talk with that vet about what are the horse's chances of returning to the previous work, what are the chances for the future, will it progress in future, etc.

     
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  9. RedBranchRun

    RedBranchRun Full Member

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    Hey bluemoon, I'm sorry I did not get these earlier, and the ones I took are poultice-y. I see problems, but any input/advice would be great. (Thank you!)

    My vet was out 2 nights ago, and we did prostride. It was interesting to watch. So far I see limited improvement, but he said he needs 5-8 days of stall rest. He feels if all goes as it should my gelding should be sound after that.

    New farrier is coming out on the 21st.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    I need the solar views... They're the most important. And heel views like in link.
    See that big ridge...something happened like 4-5 months ago. I'll bet heels are too long, but I need to see them in relation to the frog and sole depth for landmarks. Front left...medial heel appears shorter and lateral longer. Tell me about prostride and why stall rest ?
     
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