Club Foot

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by HotseatHuntSeat, Sep 10, 2018.

  1. HotseatHuntSeat

    HotseatHuntSeat Registered

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    If you were looking at a horse to purchase would you run from a ‘clubby’ hoof? I’m talking a very mild instance? Thoughts?
     
  2. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    Has the foot been x-rayed? Has the horse ever had soundness issues? Are you only doing flat work?
     
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  3. HotseatHuntSeat

    HotseatHuntSeat Registered

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    I have x rays of the foot. I really didn’t want to be limited to no jumping ever... but it’s not my primary riding focus either.
     
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  4. tlwidener

    tlwidener Senior Member

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    I wouldn't run. I haven't run. I've got one right now... and she's a POA National Congress champion. Not a jumper though; she's an all around horse.

    We do notice when she's a little overdue that she can get sore on the club foot; she has a hard time loping correctly in that direction when her angles get off. She short strides on that foot, has less reach. We've got to stay on top of her hoof care. We shoe her during show season, but she's sound barefoot. We shoe because of the unpredictability of show grounds.
     
  5. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    Many horses with club feet go on to have long and productive performance lives if they are maintained correctly which often means 4-6 week interval of shoeing to keep the foot as balanced as possible ..... but I think jumping one is asking for coffin bone problems. Do the x-rays show any dropping or demineralization of the coffin bone? What does your vet say?
     
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  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    PPEs are your friend.
     
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  7. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

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    In addition to what others have said, it very much depends on your plans for the animal. I would not utilize a club foot for breeding (due to the risk of it being hereditary. It would also be a risk for a performance horse due to affecting movement or soundness. I think a pet horse, occasional trail horse or some other type of light work is when a club foot would not be a major concern.
     
  8. Mcdreamer

    Mcdreamer Senior Member

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    Henry has a club foot. I'm transitioning him to barefoot and it's been a little rough. On pasture he's not lame but he's still verrryyy sore on hard surfaces. He also is sore in his butt but I can't tell if that's feet related or because he fell running around like an idiot in the pasture. He's primarily a trail horse though I haven't been riding as he transitions to barefoot.

    A club feet really depends on the severity of the bone structure. If it's not a grade three and you can keep up with it with corrective trimming or shoeing, the horse can live a reasonably sound life.
     
  9. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

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    Depends what you consider a club foot. Has the vet diagnoses it as a club??

    Almost every single horse will have some amount of “high low syndrom” in the feet & that is 100% perfectly normal. Depending on how good of a farrier one has can affect how obvious that is.

    For instance, I have a horse with what most would call high-low. But the high is actually slightly clubby. BUT with a new farrier - you can’t even see it, and the horse is more sound than she’s ever been with any other farrier & her feet look fantastic to boot.

    So.....it depends on how clubby we’re talking here.
     
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  10. Lodewijk

    Lodewijk Full Member

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    If it's really a clubfoot and not just a little uneven....run, run fast and far. You don't buy problems, you get them along the way.

    We've been battleling a club hoof for over 12 years now, it's a huge pain in the ass and sucking the fun out of being a horseowner (and my bankaccount). When I went to see my then year old colt nothing was wrong, they brought him 4 weeks later and I noticed the hoof immediately, didn't want to send him back over it , was just happy to finally have my own horse. So I called my farrier and he said we could fix it. What followed was years of constant correcting but the hoof grew insane and steep. We consulted with vets and other farriers, he even discussed his case at international conventions to get new insights on what options there where.

    To make a very long story short, here's a list of problems that he has had caused by the clubfoot:
    - extreme and unregular growth often with lameness
    - abscess (bumped his hoof, small surface cut grew out, pressure of the steep wall caused an abscess when it was about halfway on the hoof) second time he had a similar cut we knew how to act to avoid another abscess but it did interfere with his hoofgrowth a lot
    - severe sidebone at just 5 years old
    - founder/laminitis at 8 (constant heavy correcting taking it's toll)
    - crooked shoulders from uneven hoofs

    And probably even more but that's just of the top of my head.
    At the moment he is doing ok, he is 13 years old, he gets regular check ups from the vet and chiropractor/osteopath, he has shoes with a plastic plate and vettec sil-pak and very important: the right training. I wanted to just let him retire early at the beginning of this year as I was just tired of everything but they strongly advised against that, he needs his training, I needed to do more even. His feet have prevented me from a lot of things I wanted to do with my horse, even moving barns is difficult because he needs a particular type of surface in his paddock because he will get lame otherwise. Everything revolves around that one stupid hoof. He's still awesome and I will do everything for him, but I will never ever buy another horse with even a mild clubfoot and wouldn't advise any one else to do so.
     
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