"Clicking" fetlocks?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Elijah-Mar, May 19, 2017.

  1. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Can you provide some research that shows that horses can actually 'lack joint fluids' in situations other than the joint being opened by injury?
     
  2. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Oh don't be silly.
    Inflammation, lack of sufficient circulation due to restricted space between the joints, damaged tissue, etc, can all cause a lack of sufficient joint fluid
    Aging causes any animal to have a reduction in the amt of fluid, of any kind. I have dry eyes. Have to use Restasis twice daily and gel lubricant as needed in between. It's caused by age and inflammation. Why? Because I'm old and :poop: doesn't work at optimum potential any longer.

    You don't need a dang research paper to descibe common sense out comes. :rolleyes:
     
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  3. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I don't think that's commonsense. I am not convinced there is LESS joint fluid in those cases, or that it 'dries out', like eyes - joints are closed, internal systems and not subject to the same dynamics as eyes.

    In fact in most studies, there is an excess of joint fluid when the condition of the joint is worse, and when the joint is more mobile and less painful, there is less joint fluid, not more. I know that's often the case from experience, as well.

    There is less 'joint space' because cartilage deteriorates, not because joints are 'inflated' less by joint fluid, LOL.

    I think it's more about the quality of the joint fluid being one aspect/result of arthritis, than the quantity of joint fluid per se.

    In the presence of arthritis there are inflammatory products in the joint fluid, which is seen as a problem that contributes to the arthritic process.

    I also realize that people think they can 'replace' or 'increase' or 'fix' joint fluid by putting 'additives' in it which will 'prevent' or 'stop' the arthritic process. Yet Dr. Jackson, a very advanced and knowledgeable sport horse vet, has given lectures for years saying that joint fluid modifiers do not affect the arthritic process once it is advanced enough to show on an xray. And yes, I have used 'joint additives' on my horses. I'm not a big fan of cortisone injections, but some of the other injections I have had better experience with.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2017
  4. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Well, @slc, if you don't think Adequan increases joint fluid and thereby helps the horse's joints, then movement, there would be no need for you to read a research paper; you're already convinced.
     
  5. Elijah-Mar

    Elijah-Mar Registered

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    Sorry for late replies. I think he has an abscess brewing on his foot. Anyone want the walking vet bills? It's literally never ending problems with him. He's been in and out of work for the past month with different things going on.

    Anyway. Just to clear this up. He is never lame on the back end. He shows no sign of pain what so ever. It's like he just clicks. He can do everything normally. He can be worked fine, (when he isn't lame on the front end).

    I've had three vets look at him. One was his personal vet. Who he's had since I've had him. And they've never been wrong about a thing.
    But to be on the safe side, he was also seen by two specialist vets who dealt with joints, bones and all that.

    I've had him since he was 13 months old. He didn't have it when he came. He was sound. He was fine through the first summer, middle of the first winter he was clicking in all four legs. Threw some tendons boots on him and fetlock boots while he was on the field. His front legs stopped clicking and haven't been since. Back ones got quieter with the boots but never fully went.

    Summer - He was out basically 24/7. Clicking got worse on the back end, so he went back to just day turn out near the end of summer. He was fine through the second winter, still clicked on the back end, but it was the same and he was on different supplements throughout the summer and winter.
     
  6. HayleyS

    HayleyS Senior Member

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    Is this the same horse with the heart problems?
     
  7. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    Both of my horses for awhile did that clicking. I put them on MSM and it went away.
     

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